Staff Reports - 6/43 - SaintPetersBlog

Staff Reports

Capitol Reax: Tax cuts, certificates of need, whiskey and Wheaties, fracking

Gov. Rick Scott proposed $618 million in tax cuts this week, which included four back to school holidays and reducing the commercial lease tax.

“Governor Scott’s ‘Fighting for Florida’s Future’ tax package includes a number of cuts which will significantly support Florida’s retailers, including a reduction in the business rent tax, cutting the business tax and including an expanded back-to-school sales tax holiday among others. FRF is excited about what the Governor’s tax cut package will mean for growing Sunshine State businesses, creating new jobs for Florida families and ensuring our state remains competitive.” – Randy Miller, president and CEO of the Florida Retail Federation.

 “We know from talking to job creators across the state and the nation that the tax on commercial leases puts Florida at a competitive disadvantage. Governor Scott has demonstrated an incredible commitment to doing everything possible to make it easier for businesses to succeed, and these recommended tax cuts are critical to ensuring continued economic growth. NFIB is proud to fully support this proposal and we look forward to the Legislature cutting $618 million in taxes this year.” – Bill Herrle, executive director of the National Federation of Independent Businesses.

“Every step we take to make Florida more business-friendly means more job creators choosing to move to and reinvest in our state. Governor Scott’s recommended $618 million tax cut package will help businesses large and small invest more in creating jobs for our families and will help ensure Florida’s economy will continue to grow well into the future. We are fighting to make our state the best place for job creators and families to succeed and the Florida Chamber of Commerce will continue to work with Governor Scott and the Legislature this year to support this tax cut package.” – David Hart, executive vice president of the Florida Chamber of Commerce

“Governor Scott’s proposed $618 million tax cut package truly fights for both job creators and families across the state. Over the past few years, we have seen the exciting impact tax cuts have had on helping businesses move to and grow in our state, as well as the importance of helping Floridians keep more of their hard-earned money. In order to continue to help our economy grow, we must remain committed to lowering the cost of doing business, and reducing the business rent tax will surely help us meet that goal. AIF is proud to join Governor Scott in fighting for Florida’s future by supporting the passage of $618 million in tax cuts.” – Tom Feeney, president and CEO of Associated Industries of Florida.

Republican Sen. Dana Young filed legislation aimed to ban hydraulic fracking in Florida this week. The bill comes after years of failed attempts to ban the controversial technique by Florida Democrats.

“Our industry has a long history of providing environmental and economic benefits. The United States is the leading producer of oil, natural gas and refined product in the world, and the decades-old technique of hydraulic fracturing has led to lower energy costs for consumers and improvements in the environment. Senator Dana Young’s proposed ban could undermine the benefits that Florida families and consumers are seeing today. “The technology has been proven safe, and Florida is realizing the economic and environmental benefits of its use. Thanks in part to the increased use of domestic natural gas, ozone concentrations in the air have dropped by 17 percent since 2000, all of which makes the United States not just an energy superpower, but also a leader in reducing global emissions. Let’s not move backwards when the gains of energy security are important for Florida families.” – David Mica, executive director of the Florida Petroleum Council.

“Florida Conservation Voters applauds Senator Dana Young for sponsoring a ban on the dangerous process of fracking for oil and gas (SB 442). Fracking poses too big a risk for the millions of Florida families and visitors who rely on our groundwater for safe, clean drinking water. We’re pleased to see that Senator Young’s bill addresses both hydraulic fracturing, which breaks rock formations to extract fossil fuels and acidizing, which dissolves them. We look forward to working with Sen. Young throughout the 2017 Legislative Session as we work to ban fracking in Florida once and for all.” – Aliki Moncrief, executive director of Florida Conservation Voters

Gov. Scott this week called on state officials to repeal the state’s certificate of need program.

“Repealing certificate of need laws is long overdue. Floridians’ access to quality care has been hampered by this burdensome restriction that has remained in place due to special interests’ focus on profits over patient outcomes. Repealing CON laws will lead to lowering health care costs and expending access to the care our Floridians deserve.” – Chris Hudson, state director, Americans for Prosperity-Florida

The Florida House Insurance and Banking Subcommittee used its meeting this week to hold a panel discussion on workers’ compensation.

“Insurers appreciate the subcommittee panel discussion on the current state of the Florida workers’ compensation system. PCI and our members believe the current Florida workers’ compensation system provides essential benefits to injured workers in a timely, efficient and economically sound manner, and the wage-replacement benefit system balances the interests of employees and employers. We continue to support the 2003 Florida workers’ compensation reforms that were put in place to protect the interests of employees, as well as help control costs for business owners.

“Workers’ compensation insurers are dedicated to fostering a healthy market for workers’ compensation that accommodates employee and employer needs. If you allow frivolous lawsuits with high dispute resolution costs to disrupt the system, it can be detrimental to the stabilization of the marketplace. It’s important to continue to provide quality care benefits to injured workers at a reasonable cost.

“We encourage lawmakers to work toward a solution that protects workers, while fostering a healthy Florida marketplace so the burden of workers’ compensation costs don’t fall on employers and employees.” – Logan McFaddin, regional manager for the Property Casualty Insurers Association of America.

The Senate Regulated Industries Committee passed a bill to that would bring down the so-called liquor wall and repeal a Prohibition-era law.

“Today members of the Senate Regulated Industries Committee demonstrated their support for common sense, pro-business policies by passing Senate Bill 106, which repeals the Prohibition-era Alcohol Separation Law which requires distilled spirits to be sold separately from beer, wine and groceries. On behalf of Floridians for Fair Business Practices, we applaud their decision.

We commend bill sponsors Senate President Pro Tempore Anitere Flores and Representative Bryan Avila for their diligent efforts to tear down barriers to business growth and expansion. This antiquated law does not demonstrate any benefits to Florida consumers and retailers, and its repeal would mirror society’s desire for convenience in a changing marketplace.  Our coalition is pleased to continue discussing the benefits of passing a repeal to the outdated law with additional committees as this bill is considered in the legislature.” – Richard Turner, general counsel and vice president of government relations of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, and a member of the Floridians for Fair Business Practices coalition.

Sen. Rob Bradley filed a bill to bond money backed with Amendment 1 dollars to purchase land south of Lake Okeechobee, a top priority for Senate President Joe Negron.

“We thank Senator Bradley for recognizing that a water crisis anywhere in Florida is a water crisis and filing this important legislation. Coastal communities were under a state of emergency for 242 days in 2016 as a result of Lake Okeechobee discharges. The creation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan nearly two decades ago recognized the great need for a water storage reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee in the Everglades Agricultural Area in order to reduce the harmful discharges to the estuaries and to preserve water for when it’s desperately needed during the dry seasons. … Senator Bradley’s filing of SB 10 today moves us closer to having this critical water storage reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee that will be cost-matched by the federal government, and we applaud him for taking action to respond to Florida’s water crisis this legislative session.” – Eric Eikenberg, CEO of the Everglades Foundation.

“Senator Rob Bradley (R-Orange Park) has shown true leadership for Florida’s coastal communities and the Everglades by filing Senate Bill 10 today. The tragedies facing Florida’s coastal estuaries in 2016 were devastating to local economies and the environment. Floridians are hungry for this type of bold action to save Florida’s Everglades. After hearing from experts about water storage solutions, Sen. Bradley’s actions show that a ‘wait and see’ approach for water storage south of Lake Okeechobee is not acceptable. Audubon looks forward to working with the Florida Senate and House of Representatives to pass SB10.” — Eric Draper, executive director of Audubon Florida’s.

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Senate postpones tobacco bond cap measure

Running out of time for a vote, the chair of the Senate Regulated Industries committee postponed a bill that would repeal the cap on the amount of money tobacco companies have to put up as appellate bonds.

On Thursday, committee chair Travis Hutson yanked the bill (SB 100) from the agenda mid-discussion as the hearing’s noon ending time fast approached.

That was after a CSX Transportation spokesman told the committee he feared a repeal of the tobacco companies’ bond cap would be the first step on a “slippery slope” toward getting rid of the state’s overall bond cap.

A repeal would be an “erosion of reasonable tort reform” measures taken by the state in recent years, Bob O’Malley told the panel, adding it could lead to “repeal of the general bond cap, (which) would be a disaster for businesses.”

Sen. Greg Steube, a Sarasota Republican who sits on the committee, and state Rep. Danny Burgess, a Zephyrhills Republican, filed measures for their respective chambers for the 2017 Legislative Session.

Tobacco companies say a repeal would be unfair because, without a cap, bonds would fall under the “150 percent of judgment” rule. With some verdicts in the billions of dollars, bonds could be unreasonably large under that standard, they say.

The state’s trial lawyers back the cap repeal, saying it will force settlements and end decades-long litigation over plaintiffs’ claims of irreversible illness or early death from smoking.

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Senate committee passes Florida Building Code reform

By unanimous vote, the Senate Community Affairs Committee passed a bill Tuesday that would change the way the state makes changes to the Florida Building Code.

Every three years the Florida Building Commission votes on whether to automatically accept the entire international building code, or amend it with certain provisions of the international code.

LobbyTools reports that if passed, SB 7000 would require the commission to use the most recent published edition of the Florida Building Code as the foundation, and mandate the committee to review, rather than update, the Code every three years. The measure would also delete the provision specifying how long amendments or modifications to the foundation code would remain valid.

The bill would also carry forward any changes to the state building code through the time the next edition is published.

Committee chair Tom Lee believes that using the Florida Code as a base instead of the international code would avoid any interruption in the building industry, due to frequent code changes.

Amending the building code update process would take care of the “tremendous amount of disruption associated with these building code updates, many of the provisions of which are fairly ‘de minimis’ at this point,” Lee said at the meeting.

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After record-busting year, global shark attacks drop to recent average in 2016

After 2015’s record-busting 98 shark attacks, calmer waters prevailed in 2016. The University of Florida’s International Shark Attack File reported 81 unprovoked attacks worldwide, in line with the five-year average of about 82 incidents annually.

Four of the attacks were fatal, a drop from six total fatalities the previous year. While the U.S. had no fatal attacks in 2016, it topped the leader board for the most attacks globally, with 53.

Global attacks remain on a slow upward trend as the human population grows and aquatic sports become more popular, said George Burgess, curator of the file, housed at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus.

“A shark attack is a human phenomenon,” said Burgess, who explained that 2015’s spike in attacks was influenced by warmer waters produced by El Niño. “Sharks are a natural part of the ecosystem. The ocean is a foreign environment to humans, and when we enter the sea, we’re entering a wilderness.”

South Africa had fewer incidents than normal, with only a single, nonfatal attack. Australia, another shark attack hot spot, had 15, including two fatalities. In the South Pacific, the French territory of New Caledonia has emerged as “an area of concern” with four attacks in 2016, including two fatalities, Burgess said.

In the U.S., Florida had the greatest number of attacks — 32 — accounting for about 60 percent of attacks in North America and about 40 percent of the global total. With 15 incidents, Volusia County accounted for nearly half of Florida’s total attacks. Hawaii had 10 attacks, followed by California with four, North Carolina with three, South Carolina with two and single attacks in Texas and Oregon.

The database, which tracks shark attacks globally, defines unprovoked shark attacks as those initiated by a shark in its natural habitat. Burgess said that many of these incidents might be more accurately called “human-shark interactions,” as not all attacks cause injury, and they can include a rough bump from a shark or a bite on a surfboard.

Fifty-eight percent of the attacks worldwide involved board sports. Surfing, Boogie boarding and paddle boarding produce kicking and splashing — the kind of water disturbance that can draw a shark, Burgess said.

“Sharks are attracted to irregular activity, especially with the inevitable wipeout and the big splash that follows,” he said. “If you have a shark trailing, that’s often when it will strike.”

Although shark attacks have gradually increased, the number of fatal attacks has consistently fallen over the past century, said Lindsay French, database manager for the Florida Program for Shark Research and the attack file. She and Burgess attribute this decline to improved safety practices on beaches, better medical treatment and growing public awareness of how to avoid potentially dangerous situations.

While the chances of being injured or killed by a shark are “infinitesimal,” Burgess said, the ISAF offers recommendations for how to lower the risk of a shark attack or fend off an attacking shark.

He and French noted that while the human population is skyrocketing, many shark species are on the decline. Threatened by overfishing and loss of habitat, sharks’ complex life history makes it difficult for them to rebound quickly, Burgess said. As major predators, their numbers are inherently low compared with other smaller marine species, and their slow sexual maturation process, yearlong pregnancies and long life spans compound the obstacles to rebuilding populations.

“Once shark populations are down, recovery takes a long, long time,” he said. “They hold a special place in their ecosystem, and a loss at one node in the web of marine life is going to have an effect on the overall system.”

Via UF News.

George Burgess
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Latest on the legislative staffing merry-go-round

With a tip of the hat to LobbyTools, here are the latest movements – both on and off – of the legislative merry-go-round.

On and off: Charles Smith, previously district secretary for Broward County Republican Rep. George Moraitis, is now his legislative assistant.

On: Dennis Ragosta is the new district secretary for Ocala Republican Rep. Charlie Stone.

On: Mikhail Scott has become the legislative assistant for Miami-Dade Democratic Rep. Kionne McGhee.

On: Nancy Bowers a new district secretary for The Villages Republican Rep. Don Hahnfeldt.

On: Rebecca Zizzo is district secretary for House Speaker Richard Corcoran.

On: Jack Harrington is the new legislative assistant for Miami-Dade Republican Rep. Michael Bileca.

Off: Janine Kiray is no longer legislative assistant to Clearwater Republican Rep. Chris Latvala.

Off: Constance Baker has stepped down as district secretary for Jacksonville Democratic Rep. Kim Daniels.

On: Leota Wilkinson is district secretary for Palatka Republican Rep. Bobby Payne.

Off and on: John Love is no longer House administrative assistant for the Joint Select Committee on Collective Bargaining. Lisa Larson has replaced Love.

On and off: Lindsey Locke is the new House administrative assistant for the Joint Committee on Public Counsel Oversight. Locke replaced Michelle McCloskey.

On and off: Patricia Gosney is the new legislative assistant in the Tallahassee office of Broward Democratic Sen. Lauren Book. Joel Ramos has stepped down.

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Survey by Rick Scott committee gives governor good marks

Rick Scott drew positive reviews from Floridians on the job he is doing as governor, with a plurality agreeing that the state is headed in the right direction, in a survey released Monday by Scott’s Let’s Get to Work Committee.

In the survey of 1,000 likely Florida voters conducted in December, 47 percent thought Florida was on the right track and 40 percent on the wrong path. By contrast, 53 percent thought the country as a whole was on the wrong track.

More than half — 54 percent — approved of Scott’s job performance, with 42 percent disapproving.

The respondents mirrored the state’s vote for president, with 46 percent having voted for Hillary Clinton and 48 percent for Donald Trump. Cellphone respondents accounted for 30 percent of the sample.

The committee is a political fundraising organization tied to Scott.

Asked which issue they considered most important, the largest group said the economy, at 29 percent. Twelve percent said the environment. Respondents across the political spectrum agreed that the economy was their No. 1 priority.

Scott’s proposal to invest $85 million in Enterprise Florida drew support from 59 percent of the respondents. Thirty-four percent were opposed. House Speaker Richard Corcoran strongly opposes the program as “corporate welfare.”

The survey asked whether respondents favored using the incentive program to “grow Florida’s economy and add jobs by using state funds to encourage businesses to relocate to Florida and expand in Florida.”

Respondents also were asked about Trump’s recent jawboning to induce the Carrier Corp. to keep jobs in Indiana, even at the cost of tax breaks and other inducements, and 55 percent approved.

Among “split voters,” 71 percent approved, and among “swing market Trumpers,” 84 percent approved.

“A strong majority of 55 percent agree with Rick Scott that it was smart of Donald Trump to support government incentives to get a major Indiana company to keep jobs in the United States,” the organization said.

“Only 37 percent agree with Richard Corcoran that government should not provide incentives to keep jobs here.”

Asked about “Obamacare” — the Affordable Care Act — 42 percent strongly opposed the health care reform, and 27 percent were strongly in favor. Among Republicans, 73 percent strongly opposed the law.

Among Democrats, half were strongly in favor; among independents, 44 percent were strongly opposed and 17 percent strongly in favor.

Among “split voters,” 64 percent were strongly opposed, and among “swing market Trumpers” 77 percent were strongly opposed.

Respondents were asked about “same-day voter registration efforts being pushed by liberal Democrats” — and given a choice between boosting access to the ballot and opening the door “to fraud and abuse because ballots would automatically be counted without time for officials to verify” the registrations.

Sixty-two percent were opposed, and 30 percent were in favor — with 48 percent of Democrats opposed, 57 percent of independents, and 79 percent of Republicans.

Finally, asked about proposed legislation to create “sanctuary” college campuses that would hinder enforcement of immigration law, 63 percent were opposed, and 28 percent were in favor.

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Lawmakers look to raise money during upcoming legislative committee meeting weeks

It’s going to be a busy few weeks for Florida Republicans.

House Majority announced fundraising events for seven House Republicans, all of which are running for re-election in 2018, between Jan. 24 and Feb. 20.

The fundraising kicks off on Tuesday with an event for Rep. Bob Cortes. The event is scheduled to begin at 5:30 p.m. at The Beer Industry of Florida, 110 South Monroe Street, Suite B.

House Majority will also hold a fundraiser for Reps. Heather Fitzenhagen, MaryLynn Magar, Kathleen Peters, and Holly Raschein on Feb. 15. That event is scheduled to take place in the Library Room at the Governors Club, 202 S. Adams Street.

Five days later on Feb. 20, the House Majority is hosting a fundraiser for Rep. Paul Renner and Rep. Cyndi Stevenson in the Library Room of the Governor’s Club.

All of the events are slated to happen in Tallahassee, and are hosted by House Speaker Richard Corcoran, Rep. Jose Oliva, and Rep. Chris Sprowls.

House Republicans aren’t the only ones raising dough in February.

Sen. Jeff Brandes is hosting a fundraising reception in the Trapiche Room at the JW Marriott Miami, 1109 Brickell Ave. in Miami. The 9 p.m. “dessert and cordials” reception will benefit Liberty Florida, and will feature a visit from special guest CFO Jeff Atwater.

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Rick Scott orders flags at half-staff for Austin J. Ruiz

Gov. Rick Scott has ordered flags at half-staff in honor of a Marine who died during a training exercise.

Lance Cpl. Austin J. Ruiz of Naples died last Friday.

Scott, who has a home in Naples, ordered that the U.S. and state flags be flown at half-staff at City Hall in Naples, the Collier County Courthouse and at the Capitol in Tallahassee from sunrise to sunset this Sunday. 

“Ann and I are heartbroken to hear of the loss of Floridian and U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Austin Ruiz,” the governor said in a statement. “Like all of our incredible servicemen and women, Austin put his life on the line in order to defend our families and our freedom, and we will do all we can to honor his sacrifice.”

Ruiz was killed and another Marine was injured during a live-fire exercise at the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center in Twentynine Palms, California.

“We join all Floridians in mourning for this fallen hero and praying for his many loved ones during this unimaginably difficult time,” Scott added.”We hope that they may find comfort in remembering Austin’s bravery and dedication to selflessly serving our country.”

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Holly Raschein files to run for re-election in 2018

Count Rep. Holly Raschein in for 2018.

The Key Largo Republican filed to run for re-election in House District 120.

First elected in 2012, Raschein defeated Democrat Dan Horton, 57 percent to 43 percent, in the November general election. She led House candidates in fundraising, raising more than $549,000 during the 2016 election cycle.

Raschein currently serves as the chairwoman of the House Natural Resources and Public Lands subcommittee. She’s also on the Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations subcommittee and the Agriculture & Property Rights Subcommittee.

Raschein is one of dozens of incumbents who have already filed to run for re-election in 2018.

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Floridians head to D.C. for Donald Trump inauguration

A hush has fallen on the state capital.

Sure, there’s plenty of work to do before the start of the 2017 Legislative Session. But some Florida politicos are using this week to flee Florida and head to Washington, D.C., for President-elect Donald Trump’s inauguration.

Gov. Rick Scott will be there. An ardent supporter of the New York Republican, Scott was the chairman of the super PAC that backed Trump’s presidential bid. He was expected to head to D.C. on Tuesday, one day before the Florida Sunshine Ball, hosted by Scott and his wife, First Lady Ann Scott.

But don’t think the Naples Republican (and possible 2018 U.S. Senate hopeful) spent the day in his tuxedo and dancing shoes. According to his official schedule, Scott was scheduled to meet with General John Kelly, the incoming Secretary of Homeland Security; Republican Reps. Francis Rooney and Neal Dunn; and Mauricio Claver-Carone, a Trump transition official.

Susie Wiles, the Jacksonville political guru who helped lead Trump’s Florida campaign, traveled to D.C. on Wednesday. She’ll be on hand for all of the festivities; as will uber lobbyist Brian Ballard, the chairman of Trump’s Florida finance committee.

And it should come as no surprise that state Rep. Joe Gruters and his wife, Sydney, will be in town for the event. Gruters was one of the first big name Floridians to back Trump, and never wavered in his support throughout the campaign. The couple plans to head up to D.C. on Thursday, and plan to attend the swearing in and go to the Liberty Ball.

Christian Ziegler, a Sarasota County GOP state committeeman, also has a full dance card. He planned to attend several events hosted by the governor, as well as an event hosted by Rep. Vern Buchanan.

“With Florida being Trump’s second home, Washington, D.C., feels like it’s been invaded by the Great State of Florida,” he said in an email. “Incredibly excited to experience this event as one of just 304 Electors to have cast the votes necessary for him to become our next President.”

Former House Speaker Steve Crisafulli — joined by fundraisers Trey McCarley and Kris Money —will be there too. Crisafulli was another top Trump supporter, and played a key role in getting him to the Space Coast for rallies throughout the campaign. His name was floated as one of several Floridians who could land a gig within the Trump administration.

He won’t be the only Florida Speaker in attendance. House Speaker Richard Corcoran is will be there, even though he was a slow to warm to Trump. (He backed former Gov. Jeb Bush, then Sen. Marco Rubio, and then Sen. Ted Cruz before somewhat reluctantly backing Trump.) And look for Senate President Joe Negron, who as Republican elector helped Trump officially clinch the presidency, in the crowd.

Reps. Jose Felix Diaz and Carlos Trujillo are expected to be in town; the Miami Herald reported they’re sharing a two-bedroom apartment they snagged on Airbnb. The paper also reported Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez is making the trek north.

You’ll likely see Nick Iarossi and Scott Ross, along with their wives Debbie and Ashley, dancing the night away at one of the parties this week. Both supported Sen. Marco Rubio, but eventually joined Team Trump.

Jim Smith and Monte Stevens, both with Southern Strategy Group, are in D.C. for the inauguration. They’re in town with Ambrosia Treatment Centers, which provides care to people suffering from substance abuse, in hopes of raising awareness about the need to make top-notch care available to as many people who need it as possible.

Their trip isn’t just about business, though. Stevens is planning to tweet about all the action from the firm’s Twitter account, @SoStrategyFlorida.

Hayden Dempsey and Fred Karlinsky with Greenberg Traurig both have jam-packed schedules. Their calendar of events includes the Florida Sunshine Ball; the Republican National Lawyers Association Luncheon, which features a keynote address by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani; and an inaugural reception hosted by the Greenberg Traurig Washington, D.C. office for clients and friends.

Meredith O’Rourke, one of the state’s go-to Republican fundraisers, plans to spend the week in D.C. with “fellow Republicans and strong supporters of our clients, while looking forward to a new day for our country.”

You might spot David and Melissa Ramba, Michael Fischer, Andy Gonzalez, Evan Power (and his wife), Bill Helmich, and Todd Lewis, Nick DiCeglie, Jay Beyrouti, Justin Bean, Bob Fisher, Travis Horn and Matt Lettelleir as you flip through the channels for inauguration coverage.

Robert Hawken is turning the trip into a learning experience for his daughters. They’re planning to take an overnight train from Jacksonville to D.C. for the inauguration. Once there, they planned to attend the Florida ball and check out the parade.

Lake County Property Appraiser (and former state representative and state senator) Carey Baker be in the nation’s capital; so will Richard DeNapoli, the former chairman of the Broward Republican Party.

Even Rep. Charlie Crist, the state’s former Republican governor, will be on hand. The St. Petersburg Democrat said he was looking forward to attending the event.

“I didn’t support Mr. Trump, but I respect the fact that he’s been elected the president of the U.S.” said Crist last week.

He won’t be the only Florida Democrat in the bunch: Democrats Val Demings, Ted Deutch, Lois Frankel, Al Lawson, Stephanie Murphy, Bill Nelson, Debbie Wasserman Schultz are also planning to attend the inauguration.

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