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After infamous ‘dildo attack,’ St. Pete couple settle dispute over jewelry, heirlooms

Annette Kielhurn

After leaving her girlfriend who assaulted her with a dildo last year, Gamze Capaner-Ridley, 48, left behind $221,000 in jewelry and heirlooms.

On Nov. 28, 2016, Capaner filed a suit in Pinellas County Civil Court against her ex, 58-year-old Annette Kielhurn.

Kielhurn claimed to have misplaced the items, leaving Capaner with no choice but to sue for the value of the items.

A few days after the suit was filed, Kielhurn agreed to pay back the money owed to her ex. A confession of judgment was filed until Kielhurn can fulfill her side of the agreement.

Confession of judgment is a written agreement between a plaintiff and defendant, which states the defendant accepts liability and damages that were agreed upon in a settlement.

Throughout their relationship, Capaner temporarily loaned Kielhurn $221,000 worth of jewelry and heirlooms. Of those items was Capaner’s 6-carat diamond ring that had been her mother’s.

BayLawsuits reported that, before their split, the couple lived together in St. Petersburg. In July 2015, the two were having troubles. Kielhurn was becoming abusive, she would punch, slap and pull Capaner, as well as emotionally abuse her. Capaner decided to petition for a restraining order. Days later, she was escorted by police to retrieve her belongings. That’s when a fight broke out over a dress that led to Kielhurn being arrested for domestic battery.

Kielhurn reportedly grabbed Capaner’s arm and shoved a dildo in her face.

The incident was reported in the Smoking Gun, and the story was later picked up by Britain’s Daily Mail and others.

Capaner eventually asked the court to drop charges, saying: “She is kind, compassionate human being.” Battery charges were dropped in November 2015.

This wasn’t Capaner’s first time dealing with domestic abuse. In 2013, Capaner sought protection from Georgia courts against family violence in a separate relationship.

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Ex-employee blames McKesson Corp. of failing to protect him from union threats

A whistleblower at America’s 5th largest firm is suing his ex-employer, accusing the company of failing to protect him from “death threats.”

Teamsters Local 79 is an authorized union at McKesson Corporation, a San Francisco-based pharmaceutical distributor.

The union does not respond well to opposition, as Hillsborough County resident Lawrence Eaken found out the hard way.

For his part, Eaken did not mask his dislike for the union, voicing his “general opposition” to both company management and union members. This did not endear him to union members or management.

On Dec 29, 2015, Eaken found a death threat in his mailbox. The note called Eaken a “dog” and threatened that he would become “road kill” if he continued talking.

Although it did not state so directly, Eaken believed the note came from the union.

Eaken reported the threat to McKesson, his employer. The company violated his wish for confidentiality Jan. 11, 2016, when it confronted the employee believed was behind the threat. The following day, eight union members confronted Eaken on his way to the breakroom. The men physically blocked Eaken’s path, calling him names like “lap dog.”

One union business agent even told Eaken that, because we live in a free country, he could  “go back to his house whenever he want[ed].”

Eaken was fired February 9.

In the suit, filed Dec. 1, McKesson is accused of four counts of negligently failing to protect him from co-workers who “put Eaken and his family in fear for his safety.” Eaken is requesting compensation for past, present and future anguish, lost wages, and attorney’s fees and costs.

Eaken was employed by McKesson for about 10 years, 2006 to 2016.

McKesson is the nation’s largest pharmaceutical distributor. Fortune 500 ranked it fifth in the list of largest publicly-traded companies based on revenue. In fiscal year 2016, McKesson, which calls itself “the central nervous system of health care,” posted revenue of nearly $191 billion.

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Mites, scabies only the latest trouble in Oldsmar motel’s sordid history

A Pinellas County motel with a sordid history is now being accused of offering guests an unwelcome amenity — scabies.

Rhonda Baxter and Alex Rodriguez were guests at the Bayview Motel on 501 S. Bayview Blvd. in Oldsmar; Baxter visited in December 2014, Rodriguez in May 2015.

In two separate lawsuits filed earlier this month in Pinellas County’s 6th Judicial Circuit Court, each claim bedrooms they stayed in were infested with mites causing scabies, a skin condition.

Both say mites infested luggage and clothing and the plaintiffs claim they were “severely bitten” to a degree it required hospitalization.

Despite being a traveler’s worst nightmare, however, mites and scabies are only the most recent — and relatively minor — difficulty taking place at the Bayview over the past few years.

In June 2016, two men and a woman were arrested for allegedly using a dating website to lure victims to the Bayview, and robbing them at gunpoint.

According to the Tampa Bay Reporter, unsuspecting victims had gone to the Bayview after visiting the dating website “Plenty of Fish” to meet women. The suspects — identifying themselves as “Jessica” or “Curvy_Cameron93” — continued texting the victims, agreeing to meet them in a room at the Bayview.

After arriving, two men battered and robbed victims at gunpoint, stealing cash and personal items before fleeing the scene.

Suspects were identified as Charlie L. Woodley of Largo (charged with two counts of robbery with a deadly weapon or firearm); Cameron M. Davis of Oldsmar (also charged with two counts of robbery with a deadly weapon or firearm) and Rachel C. Brown, also of Largo, who was charged with one count of principal to robbery with a deadly weapon or firearm.

In 2008, the Bayview — known as the Aday Motel at the time — was also the scene of a kidnapping, which resulted in the shooting death of 18-year-old Javon Strange.

A September 2008 Tampa Bay Times article outlines the incident where Gregory Longley was held at gunpoint by teenagers hoping he would lead them to a man who they were disputing over stolen coins.

Three individuals — Strange, Abdusbasiyr A. Blake and Juan Carlos Morales — forced Longley into a 2000 Chevy Malibu.

As Longley and Strange, who was holding the gun, sat in the back seat, Strange lowered the weapon to start text messaging. Longley then grabbed the gun, deputies said, shooting Strange and Morales, who was sitting in the front passenger seat, before ordering Blake to stop the car.

Blake went to the McDonald’s at 4085 Tampa Road, where restaurant employees called 911. After paramedics arrived, Strange was pronounced dead at the scene.

At the time, Aday assistant manager Archie Viray told reporters that the motel is “generally quiet.”

“Nothing happens here,” he said.

Nevertheless, as for Bayview’s latest troubles, records from inspections taken around the dates of the alleged scabies incidents make no mention of an insect infestation. The 12-unit property is owned by Tarpon Springs residents Jose Ang Pe, 66, and his 56-year-old wife Maria Obra Pe.

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Mother blames oral contraceptives in death of 32-year-old Tampa woman

A grieving mother is suing the six companies responsible for her daughter’s death that she says was caused by the contraceptive Tri-Previfem.

Kansas native Antionette Logan was living in Tampa when she passed away in November of 2014 at the age of 32 after having difficulty breathing. Over an hour after arriving at Florida Hospital Tampa, Logan was pronounced dead.

An autopsy found the cause of her death was a pulmonary embolism brought on by pelvic deep vein thrombosis, which in turn was caused by both a large ovarian cyst and her obesity.

Logan’s mother, Jerri Gordon, is blaming the oral contraceptive her daughter’s daughter.

Logan was on Tri-Previfem for over a year. Others using the pill have reported pulmonary emboli, ovarian cysts and deep vein thrombosis as side effects and adverse reactions to the medicine, however, the suit claims, the producers have failed to warn users of these possibilities.

Now the companies responsible for producing the pill and putting it on the market are being sued on five counts of negligence, strict liability, failure to warn, and breach of warranty.

Although sites like WebMD and Drugs.com do not list all of the conditions Logan suffered as side effects of Tri-Previfem, they do state that in some rare, serious cases, blood clots can occur.

WebMD notes that if a person taking the drug experiences a sudden shortness of breath, they should head to the hospital immediately as you are likely suffering from a blood clot.

Many common birth control pills can cause blood clots, some of which lead to pulmonary emboli. Certain aspects of family history and personal health issues can increase the risks of serious side effects.

 

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‘Free’ Plant City orange grove sparks turf war between family, neighbors

A turf war has broken out over a five-acre orange grove in Plant City.

After her husband, Russell L. Lightsey, died in 2009 at the age of 90, Josephine Lightsey, an 87-year-old Plant City resident, no longer wanted to deal with a 6.5-acre property the couple bought together in 2003.

To avoid paying taxes on the large property, Lightsey split it into two sectors: a 1-acre lot containing her home, the other 5.5 acres containing orange groves.

She gave the property to Edgar and Linda Lariscy at no cost.

In early 2016, Josephine’s son Larry Lightsey, 67, petitioned to be his mother’s guardian and have the court deem her incompetent.

In August, he sued the Lariscy’s on behalf of his mother for illegally obtaining the property. He accused the couple of conspiring to coax Mrs. Lightsey into transferring the property to them and even accused them of forging her signature. Lightsey claimed that his mother suffered from depression following the death of her husband and she lacked the mental capacity to have clear judgment.

However, in a suit filed Nov. 23, the Lariscy’s argue that they made sure Mrs. Lightsey was certain of her choice before moving forward with the deal. Mrs. Lightsey assured Mr. Lariscy that the property was a burden and she did not want it.

Larry Lightsey did not agree, and began telling neighbors the Lariscy’s persuaded Mrs. Lightsey to hand over the property.

They are suing Lightsey for defamation.

The suit filed by the Lariscy’s suggests a neighbor, who is a real estate agent, informed Lightsey he could make “lots of money” off the property.

The Lariscy’s put in money to get the grove up and running. It is now serving as a functioning orange grove.

Mr. Lariscy was both a business associate or the late Mr. Lightsey and the couple’s neighbor.

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Pinellas county clerk sues inmate over filings, harassment

Vincent Williams

Pinellas County Circuit Court Clerk Ken Burke and County Attorney James Bennett are putting an end to the harassment by a Florida prison inmate.

The two are seeking relief over affidavits filed by Vincent Williams, who is currently serving 20 years for attempted murder. Burke and Bennett filed a joint complaint for declaratory and injunctive relief Nov. 18.

In late November, Williams filed three affidavits with the Pinellas County Clerk of the Circuit Court. The first requested Burke to be appointed a trustee for Williams.

The document stated that Burke would have a $50 million liability. The second affidavit ordered Burke to release Williams from custody. The final filling appointed Bennett, State Attorney Bernie McCabe and an employee of Burke as fiduciaries. The last added a $50 million liability to each trustee.

The suit calls these affidavits “fraudulent” and claims that they have no foundation in either law or fact. It also says the affidavits “are self-serving and gratuitous and have no legal force or effect.” All this effort by Williams was an alleged attempt to bypass court orders.

Pinellas County Circuit Court Clerk Ken Burke

The one potential effect of the documents is to adversely affect both Burke and Bennett regarding the acquisition of property in the future.

The two men have no real relationship with Williams.

Burke’s only possible contact with Williams through his official duty as the Pinellas County Clerk of the Circuit Court. Bennett claims to have never had any contact or relation to the convict.

Neither Burke nor Bennett authorized filing the documents.

Unfortunately, the two officials cannot do anything about the records without a court order.

County Attorney James Bennett

After an attempted murder in 2004, Williams was sentenced to 20 years in prison and 10 years probation Aug. 8, 2006. The time is being served at Suwannee Correctional Facility. He is set to be released from jail Oct. 31, 2021.

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Dade City’s Wild Things accuses former employees of spying for PETA, shooting abuse video

Two ex-employees of a local zoo are being sued by the organization after it claims the duo were spies for the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

Stearns Zoological Rescue & Rehab Center Inc., known as Dade City’s Wild Things, and executive director Kathryn Stearns, claim that Jenna Jordan and Delena Pennington gave PETA confidential information about the zoo.

PETA allegedly obtained footage and photos from the two ex-employees, although the suit lacks evidence the content was sent by them. The footage and pictures were then used to negatively depict the zoo in a video posted by PETA, which posted on its website an investigative article titled “The Dark, Deadly Side of Tiger Cub Photo Ops: A PETA eyewitness exposé of Florida’s Dade City’s Wild Things prompts lawsuit.”

The suit states that the video contained false statements from an eyewitness and portrayed abusive behavior toward the animals.

The video resulted in threats and angry comments being directed toward Wild Things. Eventually, the zoo had no choice but to briefly shut down its Facebook page.

Both employees signed a nondisclosure agreement before starting their employment with the zoo. The agreement prohibited employees from revealing confidential information, like photos, videos and recordings of protocol and animal care.

On Nov. 4, 2016, Pennington took to Facebook to voice her opinion of the zoo and of Stearns. According to the suit, the post stated that tiger cubs were “stolen from there mothers right after they are born” and “the GoFundMe account for hurricane Hermine was fake.”

Dade City’s Wild Things, a 22-acre “zoo and animal rehabilitation facility” is located at 7237 Meridian Avenue in Dade City. They are regulated by both the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, FWC, and the USDA, United States Department of Agriculture. Wild Things offers visitors a chance to swim with tigers or alligators or have encounters with a variety of animals.

Pennington and Jordan’s employment ended in the summer of 2016, the reasoning for this isn’t stated in the suit.

The zoo claims it was targeted by PETA like many other small zoos in an attempt to shut it down.

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Competitive bicyclist breaks bones after ‘vicious’ dog attack, blames owner

An 83-year-old bicyclist sustained multiple broken bones last year after an unleashed dog chased him down and pulled him off his bike in South Pasadena.

Charles Kleim is now suing the dog’s owner.

On Oct. 14, 2015, Kleim — an accountant who was training as a competitive cyclist — was riding his bicycle through his neighborhood. While passing a home on South Shore Drive, Kleim faced what he called a “vicious” dog, which took off after the bike.

Ultimately, the animal, owned by David Bricketto, 21, grabbed Kleim and pulled him off.

Although the dog managed to pull Kleim down, it did not physically bite him, explaining why records show no dog-bite citation was issued.

Bricketto called 911. By the time police arrived, he had secured the dog.

Kleim was transported to Bayfront Medical in St. Petersburg, where he was treated for a broken collarbone and femur along with lacerations and abrasions. Medical bills totaled $38,000.

Kleim’s attorney, Peter Sartes, told Baylawsuits that Bricketto was in the process of moving out of his late grandmother’s home, and was loading boxes in his car at the time of the attack.

As the dog’s owner, Kleim is suing Bricketto for strict liability and negligence.

The complaint says Bricketto must have known about his dog’s aggressive tendencies. Therefore, he should have had the dog restrained and put up warning signs.

Kleim seeks $120,000 for medical and incidental expenses, as well as for damages for loss of income, impairment of earning ability, and costs for suing.

A competitive cyclist, Kleim placed third in his age group at a bike race in Charlotte County March 20.

Kleim lives on South Shore Drive near the scene of the accident.

 

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Two former Pet Pal employees sue over termination, drug use rumors

Shannon Still

Two terminated Pet Pal Rescue employees are each suing the nonprofit, claiming they were illegally terminated.

Shannon Still began her employment at Pet Pal in early 2013 as Clinic Manager, where she served until her termination June 13, 2016.

Brittany Raisch worked for the rescue from October 2014 to March 10, 2016, as a kennel technician and veterinary assistant.

Both women filed separate suits less than a week apart.

Still is accusing the rescue of one count under Florida’s Private Whistleblower Act. She seeks compensation for damages including humiliation, pain, and suffering along with lost wages, employment status and benefits.

Brittany Raisch

Pet Pal faces two counts from Raisch: defamation and another under Florida’s Private Whistleblower Act. Raisch claims to have suffered humiliation, damage to her reputation, loss of wages and emotional distress.

In February, Pet Pal Executive Director Scott Daly, learned Raisch was pregnant. Raisch’s suit asserts that Daly told Raisch: “You should find another job.” He proceeded to tell Still he couldn’t “deal with another pregnant employee,” referring to Raisch as “worthless.”

The following month, Daly requested a drug test from Raisch, which she took March 10. It came back negative.

According to the suit, the test’s negative results didn’t stop Daly from spreading a rumor among Pet Pal employees that Raisch was using heroin and other narcotics.

Raisch asked Daly if all employees underwent a drug test, accusing him of targeting her because she was pregnant. She was fired that day.

Scott Daly

Daly didn’t provide a reason or cause for the termination. It was assumed by Raisch that her termination had to deal with her pregnancy and inquiry of whether all employees were tested.

Despite persistent requests for the results, Raisch failed to receive a copy of the test for more than a month.

Daly further dug the hole deeper when he falsely reported that Raisch quit after failing a drug test.

During this period, Raisch lost her child. Daly responded by telling Pet Pal employees she did not deserve a baby because of her drug use. While making those claims, Daly was aware Raisch tested negative for all drugs.

In May 2016, Still and Daly interviewed a veterinarian for a position at Pet Pal.

Still searched arrest records online for the interviewee as part of the regular hiring process and found a blemish on the doctor’s record. The unnamed doctor had been arrested for a controlled substance felony. Daly was informed of the record. However, he ignored it and hired the doctor anyways.

The suit states that the unidentified veterinarian and Daly “shared a close friendship.”

A week after being hired, a team member informed Still that the doctor obtained her phone number and was texting her inappropriately. One night, as that team member was taking out the trash, the doctor sexually assaulted and battered her by forcibly kissing her.

Still viewed one of the messages confirming the allegations and sent an email to Daly with the information.

Just five days later, Still was terminated without cause or reason. Still concluded the termination was due to her opposition of the doctor’s illegal behavior.

Pet Pal Rescue is a no-kill animal shelter and clinic for dogs and cats. The clinic is at 1900 34th St. S in St. Petersburg. To help cover funds for the shelter They also operate a thrift store at 1500 34th St. N #8 in St. Petersburg.

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Accused Tampa video voyeur cleared of all charges, record expunged

James Stanton

After detectives found hundreds of videos of women using the restroom on the computer of a Tampa executive, the accused voyeur is out free and back practicing law.

BayLawsuits reports that attorney James Stanton, the ex-chief financial officer and vice president of MaintenX, a maintenance contractor based in Tampa, has been cleared of all charges stemming from his 2014 arrest.

Tampa police expunged the arrest record in the Hillsborough County court system.

Stanton was allegedly caught after slipping up in a YouTube video where he can be seen adjusting the video equipment.

A minimum of five lawsuits arose from the tapes, which had more than 200 videos. Originally, a female employee who was allegedly videotaped in the MaintenX bathroom or shower area filed suit, followed by a least four more “Jane Doe” lawsuits followed.

One suit claimed that the companies IT director informed the executives about the videos years before the arrest, but no action was taken by the company to investigate the allegation.

The employee then went to the police.

However, a MaintenX executive claimed that no one at the company was aware of Stanton’s actions.

Initially, Stanton was set to be charged with 123 counts of video voyeurism, which would have been a third-degree felony. However, the state attorney charged him with 123 counts of a first-degree misdemeanor.

According to the latest filing in the matter, all charges against Stanton were dropped due to the statute of limitations. And as for the public record, it was as if Stanton were never charged at all.

Each of the 123 counts was for the 123 women identified in the videos.

Stanton began recording the women in 2010.

A Tampa Bay Times article published at the time of his arrest reported that Stanton was fired from MaintenX.

MaintenX provides general maintenance for various companies in the Tampa Bay region.

Stanton is currently working at a law firm in Deland and Clearwater.

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