The Bay and the 'Burg Archives - Page 7 of 564 - SaintPetersBlog

Kevin Jackson takes over the Hillsborough County Public Transportation Commission

Six weeks into 2017, the Hillsborough County Public Transportation Commission finally has a new executive director to succeed the controversial Kyle Cockream. It’s Kevin Jackson, who is expected to remain with the troubled agency as it transitions into obsolescence at the end of the year.

Jackson’s contract is only good for the end of the year. Legislation pending in Tallahassee would dissolve the PTC, and there is already work being done to transition the infrastructure of the PTC onto the Hillsborough County Commission. Unlike every other county in the state, the county commission in Hillsborough has not regulated the use of for-hire vehicles. Instead, the Legislature through a Special Act created the Hillsborough County PTC in the 1970’s. That means only the Legislature can dissolve the PTC.

The local Hillsborough delegation voted in December to support a bill sponsored in the Florida House by Tampa Republican Jamie Grant calling for the agency to die by December 31 of this year.

“We have a very unique opportunity as the Special Act is repealed, a clean slate and start over, and start moving those responsibilities into the county in some way, shape or form,” Jackson told PTC members, adding that he’s “highly motivated to get this done by December 31.”

This is not the first time that Jackson has served the PTC. In 2013, he served a seven month stint as interim director, filling in between the time that former PTC director Cesar Padilla resigned and before Cockream was hired.

PTC board members unanimously approved the terms of Jackson’s contract, which will pay him $130,000, retroactive from Monday. He will undergo a background check and is required to attend classes on ethics as part of the contract.

Jackson had been the chief investigator of Hillsborough County’s Consumer Protection Agency when County Administrator Mike Merrill recommended he succeed Padilla in September of 2013. His selection came after Padilla’s tenure had become untenable after it was revealed he was moonlighting as a security guard at a used equipment auction.

Cockream’s hiring in early 2014 was supposed to help clean up the agency’s troubled reputation, and for awhile, it did.

He came in with a sterling reputation coming off of a 28-year career with the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s office, but things were changing with the agency, as ridesharing companies Uber and Lyft  began operating in Hillsborough County in April of 2014. Cockream (initially along with former PTC chairman Victor Crist) became the faces of the agency as it began cracking down on Uber and Lyft drivers, who were operating illegally by not agreeing to be regulated by the PTC.

Litigation ensued shortly thereafter, before an agreement to have the ridesharing companies operate legally was finally signed in late 2016.

Cockream announced shortly thereafter that he would be resigning for good at the end of the year as his tenure had become increasingly controversial, after revelations about some of his actions as PTC chairman caused discomfort with some members.

It was not the first time that he  announced he was leaving the agency. In April of 2016, Cockream said he would be stepping down in July, shortly after Florida Politics reported Cockream had met with Palm Beach County commissioners regarding issues related to the ridesharing companies.

He continued to stay on the job, but a series of released email exchanges with officials from the taxicab and limousine industry in Tampa prompted new criticism, none more damaging than the report he had used employees from local taxicab and limousine companies to assist in PTC-led sting operations to issue citations to Lyft and Uber drivers. That development prompted the Florida Dept. of Law Enforcement to open up an investigation into those charges, but it ended with no action.

However, last month the FDLE opened a new inquiry into Cockream, this time regarding his handling of public records. On Monday, Cockream repeatedly pleaded the Fifth Amendment during a deposition into whether public records were deleted from agency cell phones, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

Meanwhile, also at Tuesday’s meeting, the PTC board opted to reject the recommendation by PTC staff to hire Gray Robinson to investigate Cockream’s actions as head of the PTC.

“I think the expectation is that this board will no longer be in existence so to some degree it’s a moot point,” said Nate Kilton, a PTC board member and Plant City Commissioner. “I think potentially it’s a waste of dollars. I think we need to be looking forward and not backwards.”

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On MSNBC, David Jolly wonders how serious Donald Trump is taking the presidency

David Jolly is in New York this week, making the rounds at the cable news networks as one Republican not afraid to criticize Donald Trump.

On his latest appearance on MSNBC’s The Last Word (with guest host Joy Reid), the former (and possibly future?) congressman from Florida’s 13th District called Trump’s first month in office “his JV moment,” specifically referring to Stephen Miller’s performance on the Sunday morning shows.

Miller is the 31-year old senior adviser to Trump who is reported to be working alongside Steve Bannon in crafting the President’s messaging.

Among Miller’s most provocative comments was on CBS’ Face The Nation, when he said, “The media and the whole world will soon see, as we begin to take further actions, that the powers of the president to protect our country are very substantial and will not be questioned.”

“The first month of the Trump administration has been his JV (junior varsity) moment,” Jolly said on MSNBC. “Get the 31-year-old sweaty kid off the TV, and bring in the steady senior hand.”

Jolly compared the beginning of Trump’s presidency with that of George W. Bush’s, the last president elected without winning the popular vote. Jolly said that Bush 43 surrounding himself with senior Washington officials like Dick Cheney and Andy Card, who, he said, “whether you liked them or not, we’re a steady hand.”

“We will see turnover, and frankly, this 31-year old should not have been the voice of the president on Sunday morning TV when we’re in such a pivotal moment,” Jolly said.

Jolly also questioned how seriously Trump is taking his job as the most powerful man in the free world.

“I think this is the very quiet anxiety of most Republicans, including congressional Republicans, is how serious is the president taking this job?” he asked. “He is our president. President Donald Trump. Like him or loath him. But how seriously is he accepting this responsibility and the anxiety we have is based upon the decisions he made in the first 30 days, the people he is surrounding himself with?” Jolly asked.

Jolly appeared Monday on CNN’s New Day as well and is scheduled to make another appearance on MNSBC later this week.

The 44-year-old Jolly has been increasing his media profile in recent weeks (complete with stylish glasses and a new beard) as he keeps his options open regarding 2018. Jolly lost by 3.8 percentage points against Charlie Crist, in the race for Florida’s 13th Congressional District last fall.

He engendered speculation that he was considering another run for the seat in 2018 when he hired former Crist staffer Vito Sheeley last monthThe circumstances behind Sheeley’s departure from working for Crist remain shrouded in mystery, part of was has led people to wonder about Crist’s somewhat rough beginning in his short time in Congress.

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Tampa Bay Rays owners donate more than $31,500 to Rick Kriseman’s re-election campaign

The Tampa Bay Rays, deadlocked with the City of St. Petersburg over where the baseball club may build its future home, donated more than $31,500 in January to the re-election effort of Mayor Rick Kriseman.

Kriseman is running for a second term as mayor of the Sunshine City. Voters will decide his fate later this year, with a primary election slated for August and a general election set for November.

Last week, Kriseman told supporters he had crossed the $200,000 raised mark for his re-election campaign. This includes money donated to his campaign, which caps donations at $1,000, and contributions made to allied political committees, which can accept donations of any amount.

At the end of January, Rays owners Stuart Sternberg, Randy Frankel, and Tim Mullen each donated $9,000 to Sunrise PAC, a political committee managed by Tom Alte, a Democratic campaign consultant who is quarterbacking Kriseman’s re-election campaign. In addition to those contributions, team owners Ander Cader ($1,000), Gary Goldring ($1,500) and Stephen Levick ($2,000) all made contributions to the committee.

“St. Petersburg is a city going through a renaissance,” said Brian Auld, president of the Rays and a himself a financial supporter of Kriseman’s campaign. “We see a progressive city that encourages development and growth, and we want to see that continue.”

A cursory review of campaign finance records shows that the Rays ownership has never donated at this level to an individual candidate.

Last February, the city launched its Baseball Forever campaign, an initiative of the city of St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg Area Chamber of Commerce, residents, and fans of the Tampa Bay Rays. The goal of the campaign is to convince the Tampa Bay Rays that their current site, reimagined and redeveloped, remains the best location for Major League Baseball in Tampa Bay.

In January, Kriseman met with Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred to discuss the future viability of MLB and the Rays in the St. Petersburg area.

As Janelle Irwin reported in the Tampa Bay Business Journal, Kriseman traveled to New York City, joined by Deputy Mayor Kanika Tomalin and Chief of Staff Kevin King for an hourlong meeting with the commissioner. What was not mentioned, however, was St. Pete’s “funding advantage in the region.”

To fund a new stadium, Pinellas County will expect use additional bed taxes, something the team will probably demand as a condition for staying.

“I am thankful for Commissioner Manfred’s time and share his desire for the Rays’ success,” Kriseman told reporters afterward. “I am confident that the team’s regional search will make clear that their current site, re-imagined and redeveloped, remains their best option.”

Confounding the entire situation is the Rays’ lackluster attendance record, which, for the fifth straight season in a row, was dead last in the league for 2016. The team averaged about 16,000 fans per game during the 2016 season. — nearly half of the attendance the team sees during away games.

Even more challenging is finding a location in St. Pete/Pinellas County region — as opposed to a stadium in downtown Tampa — with demographics suitable enough to support the franchise in the long-term, although, as the Tampa Bay Times optimistically noted, attendance did rise just under 4 percent in 2016, despite the Rays’ losing season.

As the Times’ John Romano wrote in October, the slight bump in attendance, and relative consistency in numbers, shows that the Rays may not be leaving the market anytime soon: “Leases, TV ratings and territorial rights are still in the bay area’s favor.”

“But the clock is ticking louder in St. Pete,” Romano added. “St. Pete needs to up its game if it doesn’t want to lose the Rays to Tampa.”

And a boost to Kriseman’s re-election coffers just might help.

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At USF, Kathy Castor touts legislation to address growing need for more nurses

Nursing is one of the fastest-growing occupations in the country.

But despite that growth, the demand is still outpacing the supply. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1.2 million vacancies will emerge for registered nurses between 2014 and 2022.

And according to Dr. Charles Lockwood, the medical dean of the University of South Florida’s Morsani School of Medicine, the gap may be even worse than anticipated. He says because the demand for nurses is going to expand with our changing health care delivery systems, “we don’t know what the number is, really.”

That’s why Tampa Democratic Representative Kathy Castor says she became a co-sponsor on a bill last week (H.R.  959) that would extend education nursing grants to support clinical nurse specialist programs.

“It provides a pathway to good paying jobs and nursing all across the country and is especially important in a state like Florida that continues to grow and have such needs for a nursing work force,” she said at a news conference held at the newly revamped USF College of Nursing George & Marian Miller Center for Virtual Learning on Monday. “The bill allows for certain scholarships and repayment programs and encourages nursing professionals to go into underserved neighborhoods and to learn clinical skills.”

Although noting that the Tampa Bay area’s unemployment numbers are impressively low, it is still a struggle to bring higher paying jobs to the region. Nursing, Castor said, is a direct pathway to a good paying job for someone in a hospital, doctor’s office, or as a teacher.

Dr. Lockwood agreed, saying that the real problem in the nursing industry is a loss of faculty members to teach the nurses of tomorrow.  “That’s really the primary job that I think we face at USF, to make sure the faculty pipeline is filled,” he said.

The statistics bear him out.

According to an American Association of Colleges of Nursing report, “U.S. nursing schools turned away 79,659 qualified applicants from baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in 2012 due to insufficient number of faculty, clinical sites, classroom space, clinical preceptors, and budget constraints.”

“A lot of our students have to work and go to school at the same time so they can go to pay their college tuition, and by having this type of program, that allows them to have their education paid for, (and) they’re able to concentrate more on their studies,” said Dr. Teresa Gore, Director of Experimental Learning at the USF College of Nursing.

“Investing in our nurses is an investment in our health, an investment in our community, and an investment in our sustainability as a vibrant society,” added Dr. Donna Petersen, Dean of USF College of Public Health, the Interim Dean at the USF College of Nursing.

 

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Kathy Castor calls some of Donald Trump’s actions ‘beneath the dignity of the office’

It’s less than a month into Donald Trump’s presidency, but Congresswoman Kathy Castor is not impressed so far, describing some of his actions and demeanor “beneath the dignity of the office.”

“President Trump is simply unprecedented,” the Tampa Democrat said to reporters following a news conference held at the USF College of Nursing George & Marian Miller Center for Virtual Learning. “His actions and demeanor are really beneath the dignity of the office. And I worry about young people and kids seeing that as an example of their president and Commander in Chief. Hopefully he’ll rein that in.”

Castor joined her House Democratic colleagues at a retreat in Baltimore last week, where they attempted to find a common strategy to combat Trump and the GOP-majority Congress over the next two years. She said that she is well aware that the Democratic base is alive and engaged in politics in a way never before seen in her decade long in Washington.

“The grassroots are on fire,” she said. “People want to know – what’s coming up on the floor of the House this week. So that’s a little bit different, where we’re having to educate all of our neighbors and encourage them and teach them how to weigh in.”

Castor says that the nature of Trump’s attempted ban on refugees and his “playing footsie” with Russian leader Vladimir Putin are actions that “really undermine our national security.”

“So there are a lot of very serious issues, and you can’t blame our neighbors for being on edge, upset and wanting to be engaged,” she surmised.

For the second consecutive weekend, one of Castor’s GOP colleagues in the Tampa Bay Congressional delegation, Pasco/Pinellas Representative Gus Bilirakis heard from dozens of angry constituents regarding his intent to replace and repeal the Affordable Care Act. Eight years ago, it was Castor who was singled out for her support of the ACA, specifically when facing a hostile crowd of Tea Party activists at a town hall on the ACA at the Children’s Board of Hillsborough County.

“People are scared and that’s what you’re seeing at these town hall meetings for members of Congress,”she said, adding that “folks are reasonably frightened that there’s going to be this radical repeal plan, they’re just going to rip the rug out from under families. That’s the fight right now.”

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At Tampa rally for Enterprise Florida funding, Rick Scott repeatedly calls out Shawn Harrison

Saying that he is “shocked” that a committee in the Florida House voted to kill funding for Enterprise Florida and Visit Florida last week, Governor Rick Scott came to Tampa on Monday to urge the public to urge their state legislators to maintain the funding for those two besieged  agencies.

“This is an important issue to me personally,” Scott said in his comments to reporters after concluding the second of three scheduled appearances around the state in what his staff is calling a “Fighting for Florida Jobs Roundtable.”

Now in his sixth year as chief executive, the “jobs governor” has taken it as a personal rebuke that lawmakers aren’t on the same page with him when it comes to fully funding the public-private agencies. His arguments for maintaining the funding are wide and varied, including his statement on Monday that a flourishing economy could enable the state to put more money into education and the developmentally disabled, but only if the Legislature comes through to support the agencies.

“Our economy is on a roll. This is crazy to stop this!” he said after hosting the roundtable at the Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI) in North Tampa.

Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn, Visit Hillsborough CEO Santiago Corrada, Port Tampa Bay CEO Paul Anderson, Plant City Mayor Rick Lott and dozens of other members from the business community sat in chairs three rows deep in a semi-circle in what was a virtual half-hour informercial for the two programs, under fire in the House as being an example of “corporate welfare” in a campaign led by Speaker Richard Corcoran.

“I am shocked that members of the Florida House of Representatives, politicians in Tallahassee, are turning their back on job creation,” Scott said, specifically calling out New Tampa House District 63 Republican Shawn Harrison for his vote in the House Career and Competition Subcommittee last week that would eliminate the Enterprise Florida economic development organization, and VISIT Florida, the tourism marketing agency, as well as a host of economic incentive programs.

Harrison narrowly won re-election last November over Democrat Lisa Montelione in HD 63, considered one of the most extreme “swing” districts in the state. The former Tampa City Council initially won the seat in 2010 but lost it in 2012 before returning back to the House in 2014.

“I’m still shocked that Shawn Harrison voted the way he did,” Scott repeated several times during the half-hour roundtable, and later when speaking with reporters afterwards. He repeatedly issued out positive statistics about the state’s economy, saying Florida’s job growth was double the national average, and that there was $771 million that came from tourists last year. Time and again, he went after the critics of the two agencies.

“What Shawn Harrison and other House members are saying – ‘oh we’re not worried about jobs anymore’ – that’s wrong!” he exclaimed. “That’s somebody’s life!”

During his presentation, he mocked anybody who voted against the programs. “How could anybody? I can’t imagine anybody who runs for office saying, ‘I’m for getting rid of jobs.’ Absolutely not.”

Scott’s pleas to maintain full funding for EF and VF sometimes reached new lengths.

“I’ve watched my mom cry because she couldn’t pay for health care. I don’t want that ever to happen to a family in our state,” he said. The sentiment might surprise the majority of Floridians who are still upset about the fact that Scott rejected expanding Medicaid as part of the Affordable Care Act four years ago, denying health coverage to an estimated 850,000 people.

Scott did repeatedly shower his affection for Jack Latvala and Dana Young, two GOP state Senators from the Tampa Bay area who support continued funding of the agencies.

Buckhorn, a Democrat who has on occasion blasted Scott, emphasized the bipartisan nature of support for funding EF and VF. And he oozed contempt for lawmakers who want to kill the agencies. “What is happening in Tallahassee is ideology is getting in the way of the practical application of what these incentives are all about,” he said, denying that it’s a “giveaway program.”

“This would be patently absurd to cut off our nose, to spite our face, just because somebody is reading off a playbook provided to them by the Koch Brothers,” Buckhorn said.

Americans for Prosperity Florida, which receives funding from the Koch Family Foundation, is a leading state agency fighting against what they describe as corporate welfare run amok. The organization tweeted out on Monday, “Rep Harrison voted against rigged system! Why should taxpayers pay to pad special interest pockets.”

Craig Richard, the new CEO of the TampaHillsborough Economic Development Corporation, has worked in economic development for the past 20 years in six different states. “I’ve never heard anyone interested in doing away with the goose laying the golden egg,” he said.

“It’s kind of silly that we’re having this type of conversation,” Bobby Harris ,the founder and CEO of freight and logistics provider Blue Grace Logistics. He said that the incentives that helped him hire more than 100 employees in his Tampa offices would have gone to Chicago instead.  He said the House vote is “not a good vote of confidence for business leaders.”

Harrison did not return a call for comment.

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Charlie Crist may be likable, but how soon before he eyes a new gig?

One of Charlie Crist’s best traits is his likability.

He can be a candle-in-the-wind on issues, depending on his audience. Changing parties infuriated Republicans and made Democrats skeptical. And once he gets a job, he tends to get wandering eyes for his next gig. But damn, he is a really nice guy. Despite his baggage, people like him and a lot of them vote for him.

That’s one reason he rose above the political tsunami that swamped Democrats nationwide and beat another good guy in Republican David Jolly to represent Florida’s 13th Congressional District.

Given that, it’s puzzling that Crist so far apparently hasn’t used his best trait to solidify the home base, even as he adjusts to life in the U.S. House of Representatives. Adam Smith of the Tampa Bay Times reported Sunday Crist has had a series of stumbles that have supporters wondering what the heck is going on.

Smith wrote that Crist and his wife, Carole, who is paid to oversee his political activities, “generated widespread grumbling and head-scratching about his clumsy start in Congress, even among longtime friends.”

Pinellas County Commissioner Janet Long, a Democrat, told the newspaper Crist hasn’t touched base with her since he left for Washington.

“I can only compare the two, and right after David Jolly was elected he was calling my office and asking for a meeting and wanting to work together,” she said. “We built a very tight relationship. I’m hoping we can build the same kind of relationship with Charlie.”

Compare Crist to other members of Congress from the area. Democrat U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor frequently returns to Tampa and Hillsborough County to keep in touch with voters.

Republicans Gus Bilirakis (District 12) and Rep. Dennis Ross (District 15) do the same.

Bilirakis, as was widely reported, held a second “listening session” Saturday with Pasco County voters who forcefully oppose his plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act. It was the second such meeting Bilirakis has had on that issue with constituents in his district. Give the man credit for showing up.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson is another politician who never forgets to keep in touch with the home folks. And we all remember how the late U.S. Rep. Bill Young was an unrelenting champion for Pinellas County.

But where is Charlie?

If this trend continues, it likely will embolden Republicans to find a serious challenger to go after his seat in 2018. It might even inspire a primary challenge from Crist’s own party — assuming he still is a Democrat by then (you never know).

Or, we have to note, people may start to wonder if Crist will lose interest in his current job the way he did as governor and state attorney general and not run for re-election at all.

He could squash all that by just being good ol’ likable Charlie. People will be waiting.

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Vern Buchanan to co-chair Florida Delegation meeting on water issues

The co-chairs of Florida’s congressional delegation, Republican U.S. Rep. Vern Buchanan, and Democratic Rep. Alcee Hastings will hold a bipartisan delegation meeting on some of the state’s most pressing water issues.

The meeting is Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 8:30 a.m. in 2020 Rayburn House Office Building, in Washington, DC.

The delegation will discuss red tide, harmful algal blooms, beach renourishment and other water quality issues. This will be the first meeting of the 29-member bipartisan Florida congressional delegation in 2017.

“Our pristine beaches and rivers are a draw for Floridians and countless visitors each year,” Buchanan said. “That’s why it’s so important that our delegation works together to ensure Florida’s oceans and waterways are clean and healthy.”

Recently, red tide outbreaks left thousands of dead fish along the Suncoast’s shores. The tide produces a toxin that can harm and kill a variety of animals, including birds, fish, sea turtles and marine mammals such as dolphins and the already endangered Florida manatee. It can also have devastating effects on humans, as shellfish from active red tide areas can cause poisoning.

Panelists will include Sarasota Mayor Willie Shaw and representatives from the Army Corps of Engineers and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

“Each year, red tide poses a serious threat to Southwest Florida’s wildlife, ecosystems and economy,” Buchanan said. “We need to do everything we can to stop future damage.”

This past summer, record amounts of toxic algae wreaked havoc across Florida, producing a bloom so large it was visible from space. The blue-green guacamole-thick algae, also known as cyanobacteria, forced many Floridians to wear masks near the water and some complained of skin rashes, headaches and respiratory issues, according to press reports.

Harmful algae blooms cause $82 million in economic losses to the seafood, restaurant and tourism industries each year in the U.S., according to NOAA.

Buchanan said he also looks forward to hearing from Mayor Shaw about beach renourishment. In 2007, the congressman secured $1.7 million in federal funding for beach renourishment projects in the 16th Congressional District.

 

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Darden Rice officially files for re-election to St. Pete City Council

Darden Rice made it official on Monday – she’s running for re-election for her City Council District 4 seat.

“Three years ago, I ran on a platform of ‘St. Pete Strong’ ” Rice said. “I’m proud to report that St. Pete is stronger than ever. I’ve spent my time on council continuing the same work I’ve been doing my entire life: expanding opportunity, working with our local businesses, and making St. Petersburg even more inclusive. I believe now, more than ever, we’re strongest when we work together.”

The announcement comes exactly two weeks after Rice informed the public that she as being treated for breast cancer. In that initial statement and again on Monday, she said that she and her doctors are confident in her treatment plan and she expects to fully recover.

“I’m humbled by the outpouring of support these past two weeks,” Rice said. “The emails, phone calls, texts, and letters have been so encouraging as my family and I adjust to my diagnosis. I’ve never let anything stand between me and serving my city, and I’m not about to start now. I will be running an aggressive campaign to talk with voters and let them know my record, how we tackle the issues we face, and what the future looks like for St. Petersburg.”

Rice defeated neurosurgeon and Tea Party activist David McKalip back in 2013, her first time winning public office after two previous attempts. She is a strong favorite to be re-elected, and as of now doesn’t have an opponent for the August primary.

 

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Rick Kriseman campaign says it has raised $200K towards re-election

Incumbent St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman has some important news to share about his re-election campaign.

“Now that we’ve had a chance to add everything up and double-check everything, it’s clear we’ve passed an important milestone,” Kriseman wrote in an email that was distributed last week. That milestone is that he has crossed the $200,000 raised threshold for his re-election bid.

Kriseman is seeking a second term as mayor of the Sunshine City. Voters will decide his fate later this year, with a primary election in August and a general election in November.

Currently, no serious contender has filed to challenge Kriseman, but it’s widely reported that former Mayor Rick Baker is contemplating a return to local politics.

Having $200,000 in the bank should send any would-be challengers the message that Kriseman is not taking his re-election chances for granted.

As impressive as that $200K number sounds, it should be noted that $92,450 of it came in before the end of 2016, according to Kriseman campaign staffer Tom Alte. That’s contrary to how the Times’ Adam Smith framed it when he reported that “the mayor raised $200,000 in the first month since he announced his re-election kickoff.”

Still, 200 grand is 200 grand. That will buy a lot of TV time and direct mail in a citywide race. As Kriseman noted in his email, this is a “historic” level of early support.

“Mayor Kriseman is grateful to have the support of voters, activists, community leaders, and employers who have donated to his campaign so that he can continue leading St. Petersburg,” Alte said. “They’ve said loudly and clearly that when we stand together for progress, we can take on the tough issues and move our city forward.”

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