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Constitution Revision Commission

Constitutional review panel money becomes a ‘bump issue’

in Statewide/Top Headlines by

The House and Senate is seemingly at odds over whether to pay for the Constitution Revision Commission.

A Sunday spreadsheet that came out of the first 2017-18 state budget conference chairs meeting of the day had a line item for the commission, which meets every 20 years to review and revise the state’s governing document.

That includes going around the state to hold public hearings for ideas on possible amendments.

The item was among more than 40 statewide appropriation bump issues in what’s known as “administered funds.” Bump issues are those that ultimately may have to be worked out between Senate President Joe Negron and House Speaker Richard Corcoran.

The spreadsheet shows that the Senate offered to fund the commission with $2 million; the House offers nothing.

“I would have to go back and look at it,” House Appropriations chair Carlos Trujillo said after the meeting. “Honestly, I couldn’t tell you anything specific about it.”

Added Senate Appropriations chair Jack Latvala: “I’m not familiar with that.”

Gov. Rick Scott asked for the commission funding out of general revenue in the “executive direction and support services” section of his proposed budget.

“We are continuing to watch this and support what the governor included in his budget,” Scott spokeswoman Jackie Schutz said.

Added Meredith Beatrice, spokeswoman for commission chair Carlos Beruff: “We are working with the CRC’s appointing authorities and monitoring the budget process.”

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Before joining Florida Politics, journalist and attorney James Rosica was state government reporter for The Tampa Tribune. He attended journalism school in Washington, D.C., working at dailies and weekly papers in Philadelphia after graduation. Rosica joined the Tallahassee Democrat in 1997, later moving to the courts beat, where he reported on the 2000 presidential recount. In 2005, Rosica left journalism to attend law school in Philadelphia, afterwards working part time for a public-interest law firm. Returning to writing, he covered three legislative sessions in Tallahassee for The Associated Press, before joining the Tribune’s re-opened Tallahassee bureau in 2013. He can be reached at jim@floridapolitics.com.

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