Being a Charlie Crist appointee will not determine the fate of Mary Thomas

Whether or not one is following the GOP primary for Florida’s 2nd Congressional District, it is getting a lot of attention both inside and outside of the Panhandle. The winner will succeed Democrat Gwen Graham, who chose not to seek re-election in a Florida Supreme Court-inspired redrawn district.

Attorney Mary Thomas is under assault in paid broadcast media. Try going on the internet without seeing an ominously silhouetted picture of Thomas charged with the sin of being a “Charlie Crist Republican” and “Charlie Crist appointee.”

The issue stems from Thomas serving in the Department of Community Affairs while Crist was governor. Michael Moline has written a must-read piece on the furious attempts to get the television ad pulled.

First, here is the truth about this silly argument. The Governor appoints agency secretaries. Agency secretaries tentatively appoint agency management.

The Governor’s Chief of Staff can, and does, block some tentative appointments. The secretary is part of the Governor’s administration. Therefore, the secretary’s appointments are part of the Governor’s administration.

The ads will not be pulled because Thomas was indeed appointed by Crist, who was responsible for his entire administration. She should feel free to criticize her opponents or Crist, but serving the public in the Crist administration will not determine whether she wins or loses.

Who is paying for these ads her supporters want to be pulled? Neither of Thomas’s opponents, former U.S. Attorney Ken Sukhia nor Dr. Neil Dunn are responsible.

For their part, Thomas and supporters are doing their best to link Dunn to Crist. The Club for Growth is running ads against Dunn and whatever connection he might have with the former governor. Sukhia is offering himself as the serious choice while Thomas and Dunn bicker.

So, who is bankrolling this fourth quarter broadside against Thomas? The ESAFund, which stands for Ending Spending Action Fund, is trying to sway this race away from Thomas.

ESAFund is not a huge player. The District 2 race is their first venture into Florida politics.

The most recently available reports posted by the Center for Responsive Politics show they have raised about $4 million this cycle. The biggest beneficiary so far is New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte, who has received $1.2 million in assistance. ESAFund has also spent nearly $300,000 against Ayotte’s opponent, Maggie Hassan.

Perhaps an ominous note comes from Kansas where ESAFund spent more than $750,000 attacking Republican Congressman Tim Huelskamp in his primary race against Roger Marshall. They also kicked in nearly $400,000 on behalf of Marshall, who handily defeated the incumbent Tea Party stalwart.

A million dollars in a predominantly rural district is a big deal. They must see similarities in the Florida Panhandle.

Who is putting up the money behind ESAFund? Marlene Ricketts kicked in the most with $850,000.

Ricketts is the wife of TD Ameritrade founder Joe Ricketts and the mother of Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts. The Ricketts family owns the Chicago Cubs.

Wrestling moguls Vince and Linda McMahon donated $250,000. Miami Worldcenter co-developer and Delray Beach Resident Bill Powers ponied up $50,000.

Crist may be running for Congress from St. Petersburg, but his presence still looms far too large in North Florida.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

As Zika comes to Pinellas, Charlie Crist and David Jolly condemn congressional failure to deal with disease

U.S. Rep. David Jolly and former Gov. Charlie Crist don’t agree on much.

But Tuesday they agreed Congress’ failure to provide funding to combat the Zika virus is unconscionable. They were reacting to news released by Gov. Rick Scott that the Department of Health had confirmed a non-travel-related case of Zika in Pinellas County.

Crist, a Democrat who is running against Jolly for the Congressional District 13 seat, said, “For this virus endangering Floridians to now spread unabated to Pinellas County is inexcusable. Lives are in danger, particularly expectant mothers, children, and women planning to have children.”

Crist added: “We need clear solutions to this serious problem. First, [House] Speaker [Paul] Ryan must bring Congress back to Washington to do their job and pass a clean funding bill. Then, Florida must expand Medicaid to cover the 200,000 women in the coverage gap without access to affordable healthcare and who are at great risk.”

Jolly, a Republican who has long criticized Congressional inaction on the threat from the Zika virus, repeated his call for Congress to return to Washington, D.C., to pass a long-term Zika funding package.

“Florida is at risk and Washington is tone deaf,” Jolly said. “Today’s news of a locally transmitted case of Zika in Pinellas County is another alarm that should prompt leadership to call members back to D.C. to address this public health issue.

“As a representative of a frontline state dealing with the Zika outbreak, I fully understand the serious public health risk this virus presents. But we must address this issue now and responsibly and without playing politics. This is a public health issue, not a political issue.”

Jolly sent a letter to Ryan expressing the urgency of the problem for states like Florida. However, Congress failed to pass a Zika funding package before breaking for the district work period.

With Congress not scheduled to return to Washington, D.C. for two more weeks, Jolly supports an emergency session to address this health issue and quickly reach a bicameral, bipartisan consensus package that can be enacted into law immediately.

“The good news is nearly $100 million per month is currently flowing to combat Zika as a result of reprogramming Ebola funds. But we must pass a comprehensive funding package that will give health officials what they need to protect Floridians and others from the spread of Zika before this threat becomes a crisis,” Jolly said.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

U.S. Chamber of Commerce holding off support for David Jolly … for now

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is perennially one of the strongest financial supporters of Republicans around the country.

The group spent more than $35 million in the 2014 midterms and had already spent more than $1.9 million for embattled Pennsylvania Senator Pat Toomey, more than a million for Arizona Senator John McCain, and $1.5 million in ads against Democratic Senate candidate Patrick Murphy.

The Chamber also spent some serious money on Republicans in contested congressional races, spending more than $650,000 on Georgia Republican Drew Ferguson and more than $200,000 on Alabama’s Bradley ByrneMartha Robey, and Kansas Reps. Roger Marshall and Tim Huelskamp.

All of those Republicans scored in the mid to high 80s on the Chamber’s scorecard of congressional votes in 2015.

One Republican member of Congress who the Chamber hasn’t lavished any largesse on is Pinellas County’s David Jolly, who, if he gets through his primary election next week, will be facing Democrat Charlie Crist in Florida’s 13th Congressional District in November.

Jolly scored a 97 percent rating from the Chamber in 2015.

A Chamber spokesperson told FloridaPolitics.com that it had no official comment, but she did leave a lifeline open by saying that the Chamber often make endorsements on a “rolling basis and often times as states pass primaries.”

Such outside funding would be a critical boost for Jolly, who can’t depend on getting any financial help from the National Republican Congressional Campaign (NRCC) this fall.

That group had a celebrated falling out with Jolly this spring over his remarks on 60 Minutes that he was told by “party leadership” that as part of his job, he would have to raise $18,000 a day.

“Simply put, this meeting never happened,” NRCC Executive Director Rob Simms wrote to 60 Minutes producers days after Jolly’s interview with reporter Norah O’Donnell aired. “It is a work of fiction. Had the reporter or producer of the story bothered to verify this claim, they would have been told as much.”

There was some hope on Team Jolly’s part that the impasse with the NRCC had faded after NRCC Chairman Greg Walden told C-SPAN back in July that, “We look forward to having conversations with him in about what kind of race he intends to run.”

Jolly told POLITICO last week that there’s been no outreach so far but predicted that could change as the race heats up.

Jolly has a little more than $409,000 cash on hand going into the last week of the primary race against Marine Corps Reserve brigadier general Mark Bircher.

Crist has over $607,000 cash on hand.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Joe Henderson: GOP message for David Jolly, ‘Play along. Or else.’

It was a big story earlier this year when U.S. Rep. David Jolly proposed a law that would stop lawmakers, especially those named David Jolly, from spending at least four hours a day on the phone begging for money.

He even went on “60 Minutes” to promote his bill, called the Stop Act. He told a national audience how members of Congress have hours of fundraising for themselves and their party built into their daily schedules. They are given a script to follow and a list of potential donors to call.

They are expected to play along.

The ridiculous practice turns members of Congress into glorified telemarketers, which is why I thought his bill was a great idea.

Reality being what it is, though, I also wondered if he wasn’t writing his political obituary by going public. Like what he said or not (and I did like it) he was violating the code by revealing one of those things big-party bosses would just as soon you didn’t know.

Rebellion has consequences, especially from a member serving his first full term in the House.

I guess we are seeing that now.

Politico reported that the National Republican Congressional Committee has essentially abandoned Jolly as he prepares for an expected battle against Democrat Charlie Crist in November.

Let’s not get ahead of things.

Jolly first has to win the Aug. 30 Republican primary against Mark Bircher, who is attacking Jolly for his refusal to support Donald Trump. Most everyone expects Jolly will win, especially since the name “Trump” isn’t exactly magic these days.

Assuming that happens, he faces the prospect of an expensive and potentially nasty fight to keep his seat. And that’s where the NRCC silence is speaking loudly.

All this drama with the national committee shows how deeply Jolly must have annoyed his party’s leadership. If the anti-Trump movement turns into a ballot-box tsunami, Republicans could need every seat they can get to keep control of the House.

Yet, at this point, they appear willing to let a reasonably popular member lose without lifting so much as a finger to give him a lifeline.

“When we win this, we will have done it our own way, with nobody owning us,” Jolly told POLITICO.

Things could change after the primary, of course, as the big picture begins to take shape. Party bosses easily could decide that Jolly has been punished enough, and that even a guy who is a party rebel is better than a Democrat who will vote for things Hillary Clinton wants.

Totally conceivable.

It also should be noted that Jolly’s aversion to fundraising hasn’t left him penniless. The committee “Friends of David Jolly” has raised more than $1.4 million, according to the latest financial records.

Crist, by comparison, has raised $996,000.

Either way, the party sent a message for Jolly and those who might agree with him: Play along.

Or else.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Pinellas Democratic Party withdraws CRA grant application after GOP attack

After being attacked by their Republican counterparts, the Pinellas Democratic Executive committee announced on Thursday that it will not accept the $531 grant they received to install native plants around its headquarters on 2250 1st Avenue North in St. Petersburg. The grant came via a $338,000 appropriation that the St. Pete City Council made to organizations inside the South St. Petersburg Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) to improve and enhance their buildings.

Donald Trump isn’t the only bully within the Republican Party and certainly isn’t the only one pushing crazy ideas, but we believe that it is important to address these neighborhoods – that have been so neglected by previous Mayors – so, we are withdrawing our grant application in order to show our support for this very important program,” said Susan McGrath, the chair of the Pinellas County Democratic Executive Committee.

Her decision came a day after Nick DiCeglie, the chairman of the Pinellas County Republican Party, blasting his Democratic counterpart for requesting taxpayer funds to beautify its local headquarters in St. Petersburg in the first place.

“For the Pinellas Country Democratic Party to even request tax-payer dollars to improve their office is so outside the bounds of propriety I am frankly disgusted,” DiCeglie said in a statement issued on Wednesday. “The fact that the grant was approved by the city and then City Council is downright horrifying, whether the city attorneys say it is legal or not,” he wrote. “The Pinellas Democratic party should return the grant money and apologize to the City of St. Petersburg and its taxpayers.”

The only council member to oppose the funding was Ed Montanari, the only Republican on the seven-member board. McGrath lashed out at him in her statement.

“The Pinellas Democratic Party pays thousands of dollars in local property taxes each year to the city of St. Petersburg and simply applied for a grant; getting back a few hundred of our tax dollars to pay for this neighborhood betterment program,” she said.

“Republican Ed Montanari has no objections with giving these grants to religious organizations and other community groups but believe that we should not be eligible. That seems like a double standard. He never bothered to reach out to myself or anyone associated with the Pinellas Democratic Party to express his concerns but instead staged a political stunt to try to score political points.  We were simply asking to be treated the same as any other taxpayer – but Ed Montanari believes that we should be treated differently.”

Montanari was not immediately available for comment.

McGrath had said that the party was going to match the city’s contribution with at least $500 of their own money on the landscaping project.

 

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Mitch Perry Report for 8.18.16 – The Affordable Care Act is getting less affordable

There’s more news about the Affordable Care Act this week, and it ain’t that good.

Aetna announced on Tuesday it would be pulling out of Florida and 10 other states next year, giving those on the government plan less options for choice here in the Sunshine State.

There have always been problems with the ACA, and they’re starting to exacerbate.

But the answer isn’t just to repeal it, like most congressional Republicans have invoked like a mantra for the past three years.

However, Democrats have got to raise their game and not just robotically defend it.

This is a test for all of our federal candidates on the ballot this fall – for David JollyCharlie CristMarco Rubio and probably, Patrick Murphy – what do you plan to do?

Hillary Clinton is calling for a “public option” for states, which would expand health insurance coverage beyond the current provisions in Obamacare. Clinton also is calling for allowing people 55 years and older to be able to enroll in Medicare. Currently, the typical age for enrollment is 65. She pledged to expand funding by $40 billion for primary care services at federally qualified health care centers.

Will that get congressional approval, especially if Republican still control the House? I have no idea, but having Washington remain at loggerheads on our health care coverage is simply not acceptable, not with costs going up everywhere (not just with the ACA) and the country only getting older, this is as big a problem we have in this country.

According to today’s New York Times, “The administration is also hunting for consumers who can deliver ‘testimonials’ advertising the benefits of coverage under the Affordable Care Act. “Interested consumers could appear in television, radio, print and/or digital ads and on social media,” the administration said in an appeal sent last week to health care advocates and insurance counselors.”

The paper reports that in Tennessee, Cigna last week requested rate increases averaging 46 percent, double the request it made in June, and Humana is seeking an average increase of 44 percent, up from 29 percent in June. The other major carrier in the state, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, said it was standing by its original request for increases averaging 62 percent in 2017.

The Affordable Care Act is becoming less affordable, by the day it seems. Time for an intervention.

In other news…

The Congressional Black Caucus PAC is backing Patrick Murphy in the U.S. Senate race, and Pam Keith doesn’t like it one bit.

Victor Crist wants Jeff Brandes to know he’s not down with proposed rules that could compel Uber and Lyft to leave Hillsborough County.

Speaking of Brandes, the St. Petersburg state Senator and co-sponsor of Amendment 4 on this month’s ballot takes exception to criticism of the proposal made by one Al Sharpton.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz is crushing Tim Canova in their CD 23 race in South Florida, according to a new poll published on Wednesday.

And more endorsements: Frank Peterman is supporting Wengay Newton for the job he once held – representing House District 70 in Tallahassee (It was District 55 when he was in office, for what it’s worth).

And the Florida Education Association is backing Ben Diamond in the House District 68 contest.

The Dept. of Children and Families says that New Beginnings of Tampa did no wrong back in 2008, the second government investigation that has cleared the group after a series of damning articles were published by the Tampa Bay Times in late 2014.

Hillsborough County makes a move to preempt any civil unrest if things go sour between law enforcement and the community.

 

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Expand Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security, Charlie Crist says

Former Gov. Charlie Crist spent part of Tuesday morning visiting a housing development in the unincorporated Lealman area that was designed mostly for veterans and disabled veterans.

Charlie Crist Duval ParkCrist went to Duval Park to see for himself one solution to some of the obstacles veterans face when trying to return to private life. Those obstacles were at the forefront of a roundtable discussion he held Friday with a group of veterans.

What he found was a place one vet likened to “heaven.” But he found that, even in an earthly heaven, there are lot of needs — from funding shortfalls that leave veterans relying on food stamps, long waits to get disability payments from Veterans Affairs, and Medicare and Medicaid plans that don’t cover basic health needs, like dental care.

Additional funding for the VA, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security would help, he said.

“There’s a lot to be done,” Crist said. “It’s hard for me to understand why a member of Congress would not vote for increased allocations for veterans.”

Unfortunately, he said, political game playing is blocking the expansion of programs like Medicare and Medicaid that could help veterans and their families.

“It’s cruel, frankly,” Crist said. “But we will overcome it by being persistent.”

Charlie Crist Duval ParkCrist, a Democrat, is running for Congressional District 13 seat held by David Jolly. Jolly is facing a challenge in the Aug. 30 Republican primary from retired Gen. Mark Bircher. Crist will run against the winner in the Nov. 8 general election.

Duval Park was conceived about eight years ago as a housing complex in the largely poor Lealman area. It was the first venture into residential construction by the Sembler company. But after four houses were built, the project ground to a halt. Those homes stood vacant for years.

Last year, Blue Sky Communities bought the 10-acre site and re-envisioned it as an 88-unit housing site mostly for veterans and disabled veterans. The project has one-, two- and three-bedroom units that are leased to the veterans at substantially reduced rates. There is also a clubhouse, a pool with wheelchair access, and access to the next-door 38-acre Joe’s Creek Greenway Park.

It was backed in part by money and other support from the Pinellas County Housing Authority. Case management support is provided by the Boley Center and ServiceSource of Clearwater.

It began taking applications in October and people started moving in at the beginning of the year.

Paul Mabry, 58, said Duval Park has been a blessing. Mabry, am Army veteran, was injured while training on a mortar range. He’s missing a piece of his calf, and still has shrapnel in his foot and hip. The VA says he has a 10 percent disability. He was homeless for a short time before he found out about Duval Park from St. Vincent de Paul.

“What a blessing,” Mabry said. “There’s not an adjective in the English language that would do it justice.”

Mabry has been struggling since 1981 to have the VA rank his disability as more severe than 10 percent.

Craig Matthew McArthur, also 58, is a Navy veteran who was homeless for two-and-a-half to three years before finding out about Duval Park from St. Vincent de Paul. He had a heart attack while living on the streets. His heart condition is classified as chronic. He got a MRSA infection in his leg from the operation when they removed a vein to transplant to his heart.

Charlie Crist Duval Park“This is wonderful … heaven,” McArthur said. McArthur said he was never told until recently that he might have VA benefits.

The difficulties faced by Mabry, McArthur and others at Duval Park are why Crist said that, if elected, he would hire a veteran to be available to help usher other veterans through the process, to answer questions and to aid in getting them the help they need.

As for Duval Park, Crist said, “it’s beautiful.”

The problem, he said, is that there is not enough of it. It has a waiting list of 240 veterans who would like to live there.

“We need to expand the ability for more people to have this kind of opportunity,” Crist said.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

In mailer, HD 60 candidate Jackie Toledo says she’d crack down on “illegal aliens” if elected

House District 60 Republican candidate Jackie Toledo says if elected to the Florida Legislature, she’d work to repeal two immigration laws passed by the Republican majority in recent years.

Toledo is battling against business person Rebecca Smith in the Republican race for the HD seat on Aug. 30. In a campaign mailer, Toledo says that “Politicians have passed some BAD laws. Jackie Toledo will REPEAL THEM.”

The mailer goes on to say that on Toledo’s list of “bad bills to repeal on day one” would be legislation that provides in-state tuition and law licenses for “illegal aliens.”

Both bills passed in 2014, as Governor Rick Scott was battling for the Hispanic vote as he faced a tough reelection campaign against Charlie Crist.

HB 851 allows qualified undocumented immigrants to pay in-state tuition rates at public colleges and universities. Previously, Florida students who sought in-state tuition rates were required to provide documentation proving the residency of their parents or legal guardians, which was often impossible for the children of immigrants in the country illegally. The law allows students to pay in-state tuition regardless of immigration status, as long as they have attended a Florida high school for three years, could provide a transcript as evidence they graduated, and enroll in college within two years after graduating from high school.

On the last day of that same session in the spring of 2014, the Legislature passed and Scott signed HB 755 that would allow some illegal immigrants to obtain law licenses from the Florida Bar.  Undocumented immigrants who aspire to be lawyers would have to have been brought to the country as minors, have lived in the United States for ten years, be legally documented workers, have Social Security cards, and be registered for selective service.

The legislation was inspired by the case of Largo resident Jose Godinez-Samperio, a Mexico native who the Florida Supreme Court had ruled could not legally be admitted into the Bar even though he passed its entry exam in 2011.

“Politicians in both parties pass some bad laws, and Jackie will work with her colleagues in the Legislature to educate them on the need to change these policies,” says Ryan Wiggins, a spokesperson for the Toledo campaign.” Her background as the daughter of legal immigrants from Peru makes her uniquely qualified to do so.”

Toledo is a native of Lima, Peru who moved with her parents to the United States as a child. Her first foray into electoral politics was a year ago, when she narrowly lost a bid for a seat on the Tampa City Council.

Wiggins says that “nearly every voter Jackie talks to is concerned about illegal immigration and its effects on our economic well-being and national security, and right fully so. Voters are upset that politicians continue to give taxpayer benefits like subsidized, in-state tuition rates to undocumented immigrants, and then passes legislation that allows undocumented immigrants to practice law. It’s not fair to hardworking Floridians who play by the rules and follow our laws each and every day.”

Smith declined to comment.

The winner of the Toledo-Smith race later this month will face Democrat David Singer in November.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

New hacker document dump incudes DCCC notes on CD 13 race

Files posted Monday by hacker group Guccifer 2.0 include internal documents from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) on congressional races in Florida.

They explicitly contain “campaign overviews” and “paths to victory” in Congressional Districts 7, 10, 13, 18 and 26.

The document related to the Pinellas County’s 13th Congressional District race is dated from April when Eric Lynn was still running against Charlie Crist for the Democratic nomination.

Lynn has since dropped out of the race and is now running for a state House seat.

The campaign document overview says this about CD 13:

The un-gerrymandering and elimination of minority-packed districts has changed the makeup of FL-13 making it much more favorable to Democrats. FL-13 is located entirely within Pinellas County, which is located on the western side of the Florida peninsula near Tampa Bay. The largest city in the district is St. Petersburg (colloquially “St. Pete”). The district is entirely within the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater media market, which has a cost per point of $450 for candidates and $540 for issue campaigns. The Florida 13 will include Gov. Crist’s hometown of St. Petersburg, where he currently lives and spends much of his time. Eric Lynn is also a native of St. Pete.

It was written before CD 13 GOP incumbent David Jolly deciding to get back into the race, where he is expected to defeat retired Marine Brigadier General Mark Bircher in the primary election in two weeks. But it does have a few things to say about former Mayor Rick Baker, still rumored at the time to be considering a run for the Republican nomination.

— Rick Baker (Not announced but has been floated as potential R candidate).

— Attempted to withhold $2.3 million in pay raises from city workers, but received raises from City Council at 12:50 a.m. after television cameras left.

— Supported increase in utility fees.

— “Unsure” about whether he supported in-state tuition for children of undocumented immigrants.

The document also includes  a file on CD 10 candidate Bob Poe, presumably from one of his opponents, Val Demings. On the website, the file is listed “(from Demings)”and was prepared by True Stories Research.

“Poe’s time at the helm of the Florida Democratic Party can’t be described as anything but a disaster,” reads one sentence from the document. “Rather, his tenure spanned two of the most disastrous elections in Florida history and he received most of the blame for the outcomes and the state of the party, rightly or wrongly.”

Last Friday, Guccifer 2.0 released personal cell phone numbers and private email addresses of members of the DCCC. Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which on Friday night published members’ personal cell phone numbers and some private email addresses. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said Saturday that it triggered a series of “sick calls, voicemails and text messages.”

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Adam Putnam endorses David Jolly in CD 13

Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam is throwing his support behind Rep. David Jolly.

Putnam has endorsed Jolly in Florida’s 13th Congressional District. The endorsement comes just two weeks ahead of the Aug. 30 primary.

“David Jolly has a proven record of putting people before politics and his community’s interests before Washington’s,” said Putnam in a statement.

Putnam knows a thing or two about serving in Congress. Putnam spent 10 years representing Florida’s 12th Congressional District, stepping down in 2010 to run for Agriculture Commissioner. A lifelong Floridian, Putnam is widely believed to be gearing up for a 2018 gubernatorial bid.

“It’s an honor to have Commissioner Putnam’s support,” said Jolly in a statement. “He’s one of Florida’s greatest leaders, committed always to economic growth and individual liberty — a free market constitutionalist whose support is a true honor.”

While most of the focus has been on the likely match-up between Jolly and Democrat Charlie Crist in November, Jolly does face a primary challenger.

Jolly faces Mark Bircher in the Aug. 30 primary. The race marks the second time Bircher and Jolly will face off in a Republican primary. Bircher finished third behind Jolly and Kathleen Peters in special Republican primary in January 2014.

But Bircher faces an uphill battle in his quest to unseat Jolly. The Indian Shores Republican has received the backing of establishment Republicans, including former Gov. Jeb Bush and Rep. Vern Buchanan, the chairman of the Florida congressional delegation.

“David has demonstrated he has the capability to break through the dysfunction in Washington,” said Putnam. “He is without a doubt the right man for the job.”

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons