As Zika comes to Pinellas, Charlie Crist and David Jolly condemn congressional failure to deal with disease

U.S. Rep. David Jolly and former Gov. Charlie Crist don’t agree on much.

But Tuesday they agreed Congress’ failure to provide funding to combat the Zika virus is unconscionable. They were reacting to news released by Gov. Rick Scott that the Department of Health had confirmed a non-travel-related case of Zika in Pinellas County.

Crist, a Democrat who is running against Jolly for the Congressional District 13 seat, said, “For this virus endangering Floridians to now spread unabated to Pinellas County is inexcusable. Lives are in danger, particularly expectant mothers, children, and women planning to have children.”

Crist added: “We need clear solutions to this serious problem. First, [House] Speaker [Paul] Ryan must bring Congress back to Washington to do their job and pass a clean funding bill. Then, Florida must expand Medicaid to cover the 200,000 women in the coverage gap without access to affordable healthcare and who are at great risk.”

Jolly, a Republican who has long criticized Congressional inaction on the threat from the Zika virus, repeated his call for Congress to return to Washington, D.C., to pass a long-term Zika funding package.

“Florida is at risk and Washington is tone deaf,” Jolly said. “Today’s news of a locally transmitted case of Zika in Pinellas County is another alarm that should prompt leadership to call members back to D.C. to address this public health issue.

“As a representative of a frontline state dealing with the Zika outbreak, I fully understand the serious public health risk this virus presents. But we must address this issue now and responsibly and without playing politics. This is a public health issue, not a political issue.”

Jolly sent a letter to Ryan expressing the urgency of the problem for states like Florida. However, Congress failed to pass a Zika funding package before breaking for the district work period.

With Congress not scheduled to return to Washington, D.C. for two more weeks, Jolly supports an emergency session to address this health issue and quickly reach a bicameral, bipartisan consensus package that can be enacted into law immediately.

“The good news is nearly $100 million per month is currently flowing to combat Zika as a result of reprogramming Ebola funds. But we must pass a comprehensive funding package that will give health officials what they need to protect Floridians and others from the spread of Zika before this threat becomes a crisis,” Jolly said.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Mitch Perry Report for 8.23.16 – Terry McAuliffe fulfills his promise

Donald Trump calls himself “the law and order candidate,” so one shouldn’t be surprised about his reaction to Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe‘s announcement yesterday that he had signed papers restoring the voting rights of nearly 13,000 ex-felons.

Tump accused McAuliffe of “getting thousands of violent felons to the voting booth in an effort to cancel out the votes of both law enforcement and crime victims.”

Nevermind the fact that Virginia was just one of less than a handful of states that does not automatically restore the voting rights to ex-felons. McAuliffe’s announcement was a fulfillment of a promise he made when addressing the Florida delegation of Democrats at the DNC last month in Philadelphia.

In April, the Virginia Governor issued a sweeping order restoring rights to all ex-offenders who are no longer incarcerated or on probation or parole. That move was nixed by the Virginia Supreme Court however, which ruled last month that he had overstepped his clemency powers, agreeing with state Republicans who challenged his order, arguing the governor can only restore voting rights on a case-by-case basis and not en masse. So McAuliffe told Florida Democrats  that’s exactly what would do, and the first batch of 13,000 were given those rights yesterday.

His move comes as a couple of Florida Republicans in the Cabinet (some who still have aspirations in politics) told the Miami Herald’s Mary Ellen Klas that they’re willing to revisit the Sunshine State’s hardcore rules on this subject. Yes, Florida is one of only 4 states (including Virginia)  that permanently strip felons of voting rights unless the governor lifts the prohibition.

“If someone does an analysis, we have been granting civil rights to those who were waiting who would have automatically had their rights restored (under the previous system) and it’s probably time for us to revisit,” CFO Jeff Atwater told the Herald.

“Having had some time and experience on the Clemency Board, I’ve come to believe that there are opportunities for improvement,” added Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam.

More than 10,000 men and women who have served their time remain on a waiting list to go before Putnam, Atwater, Attorney General Pam Bondi and Governor Rick Scott to have their cases reviewed individually, with the possibility of them granting them their voting rights. But hundreds of thousands have given up that hope.

In other news…

David Jolly has one of the best scores of anybody on the US Chamber of Commerce congressional scorecards. Yet the organization that spent more than $35 million in helping Republicans in 2014, hasn’t kicked out a dime for him this year.

It’s just not college students bummed at the absurdly high levels of debt they incur after graduating. The realtors want some legislative action as well, since it means that younger people have fewer dollars available to buy new homes.

Bob Buckhorn is being proactive in having his city prepared to deal with the Zika virus.

The Mayor also had some kind words to say of comedian/actress and now author Amy Schumer, after she offered some not so kind words about his city in her new memoir.

Tim Canova says Debbie Wasserman Schultz has too close of a relationship with Big Sugar interests.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

U.S. Chamber of Commerce holding off support for David Jolly … for now

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is perennially one of the strongest financial supporters of Republicans around the country.

The group spent more than $35 million in the 2014 midterms and had already spent more than $1.9 million for embattled Pennsylvania Senator Pat Toomey, more than a million for Arizona Senator John McCain, and $1.5 million in ads against Democratic Senate candidate Patrick Murphy.

The Chamber also spent some serious money on Republicans in contested congressional races, spending more than $650,000 on Georgia Republican Drew Ferguson and more than $200,000 on Alabama’s Bradley ByrneMartha Robey, and Kansas Reps. Roger Marshall and Tim Huelskamp.

All of those Republicans scored in the mid to high 80s on the Chamber’s scorecard of congressional votes in 2015.

One Republican member of Congress who the Chamber hasn’t lavished any largesse on is Pinellas County’s David Jolly, who, if he gets through his primary election next week, will be facing Democrat Charlie Crist in Florida’s 13th Congressional District in November.

Jolly scored a 97 percent rating from the Chamber in 2015.

A Chamber spokesperson told FloridaPolitics.com that it had no official comment, but she did leave a lifeline open by saying that the Chamber often make endorsements on a “rolling basis and often times as states pass primaries.”

Such outside funding would be a critical boost for Jolly, who can’t depend on getting any financial help from the National Republican Congressional Campaign (NRCC) this fall.

That group had a celebrated falling out with Jolly this spring over his remarks on 60 Minutes that he was told by “party leadership” that as part of his job, he would have to raise $18,000 a day.

“Simply put, this meeting never happened,” NRCC Executive Director Rob Simms wrote to 60 Minutes producers days after Jolly’s interview with reporter Norah O’Donnell aired. “It is a work of fiction. Had the reporter or producer of the story bothered to verify this claim, they would have been told as much.”

There was some hope on Team Jolly’s part that the impasse with the NRCC had faded after NRCC Chairman Greg Walden told C-SPAN back in July that, “We look forward to having conversations with him in about what kind of race he intends to run.”

Jolly told POLITICO last week that there’s been no outreach so far but predicted that could change as the race heats up.

Jolly has a little more than $409,000 cash on hand going into the last week of the primary race against Marine Corps Reserve brigadier general Mark Bircher.

Crist has over $607,000 cash on hand.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Joe Henderson: GOP message for David Jolly, ‘Play along. Or else.’

It was a big story earlier this year when U.S. Rep. David Jolly proposed a law that would stop lawmakers, especially those named David Jolly, from spending at least four hours a day on the phone begging for money.

He even went on “60 Minutes” to promote his bill, called the Stop Act. He told a national audience how members of Congress have hours of fundraising for themselves and their party built into their daily schedules. They are given a script to follow and a list of potential donors to call.

They are expected to play along.

The ridiculous practice turns members of Congress into glorified telemarketers, which is why I thought his bill was a great idea.

Reality being what it is, though, I also wondered if he wasn’t writing his political obituary by going public. Like what he said or not (and I did like it) he was violating the code by revealing one of those things big-party bosses would just as soon you didn’t know.

Rebellion has consequences, especially from a member serving his first full term in the House.

I guess we are seeing that now.

Politico reported that the National Republican Congressional Committee has essentially abandoned Jolly as he prepares for an expected battle against Democrat Charlie Crist in November.

Let’s not get ahead of things.

Jolly first has to win the Aug. 30 Republican primary against Mark Bircher, who is attacking Jolly for his refusal to support Donald Trump. Most everyone expects Jolly will win, especially since the name “Trump” isn’t exactly magic these days.

Assuming that happens, he faces the prospect of an expensive and potentially nasty fight to keep his seat. And that’s where the NRCC silence is speaking loudly.

All this drama with the national committee shows how deeply Jolly must have annoyed his party’s leadership. If the anti-Trump movement turns into a ballot-box tsunami, Republicans could need every seat they can get to keep control of the House.

Yet, at this point, they appear willing to let a reasonably popular member lose without lifting so much as a finger to give him a lifeline.

“When we win this, we will have done it our own way, with nobody owning us,” Jolly told POLITICO.

Things could change after the primary, of course, as the big picture begins to take shape. Party bosses easily could decide that Jolly has been punished enough, and that even a guy who is a party rebel is better than a Democrat who will vote for things Hillary Clinton wants.

Totally conceivable.

It also should be noted that Jolly’s aversion to fundraising hasn’t left him penniless. The committee “Friends of David Jolly” has raised more than $1.4 million, according to the latest financial records.

Crist, by comparison, has raised $996,000.

Either way, the party sent a message for Jolly and those who might agree with him: Play along.

Or else.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Mitch Perry Report for 8.18.16 – The Affordable Care Act is getting less affordable

There’s more news about the Affordable Care Act this week, and it ain’t that good.

Aetna announced on Tuesday it would be pulling out of Florida and 10 other states next year, giving those on the government plan less options for choice here in the Sunshine State.

There have always been problems with the ACA, and they’re starting to exacerbate.

But the answer isn’t just to repeal it, like most congressional Republicans have invoked like a mantra for the past three years.

However, Democrats have got to raise their game and not just robotically defend it.

This is a test for all of our federal candidates on the ballot this fall – for David JollyCharlie CristMarco Rubio and probably, Patrick Murphy – what do you plan to do?

Hillary Clinton is calling for a “public option” for states, which would expand health insurance coverage beyond the current provisions in Obamacare. Clinton also is calling for allowing people 55 years and older to be able to enroll in Medicare. Currently, the typical age for enrollment is 65. She pledged to expand funding by $40 billion for primary care services at federally qualified health care centers.

Will that get congressional approval, especially if Republican still control the House? I have no idea, but having Washington remain at loggerheads on our health care coverage is simply not acceptable, not with costs going up everywhere (not just with the ACA) and the country only getting older, this is as big a problem we have in this country.

According to today’s New York Times, “The administration is also hunting for consumers who can deliver ‘testimonials’ advertising the benefits of coverage under the Affordable Care Act. “Interested consumers could appear in television, radio, print and/or digital ads and on social media,” the administration said in an appeal sent last week to health care advocates and insurance counselors.”

The paper reports that in Tennessee, Cigna last week requested rate increases averaging 46 percent, double the request it made in June, and Humana is seeking an average increase of 44 percent, up from 29 percent in June. The other major carrier in the state, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, said it was standing by its original request for increases averaging 62 percent in 2017.

The Affordable Care Act is becoming less affordable, by the day it seems. Time for an intervention.

In other news…

The Congressional Black Caucus PAC is backing Patrick Murphy in the U.S. Senate race, and Pam Keith doesn’t like it one bit.

Victor Crist wants Jeff Brandes to know he’s not down with proposed rules that could compel Uber and Lyft to leave Hillsborough County.

Speaking of Brandes, the St. Petersburg state Senator and co-sponsor of Amendment 4 on this month’s ballot takes exception to criticism of the proposal made by one Al Sharpton.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz is crushing Tim Canova in their CD 23 race in South Florida, according to a new poll published on Wednesday.

And more endorsements: Frank Peterman is supporting Wengay Newton for the job he once held – representing House District 70 in Tallahassee (It was District 55 when he was in office, for what it’s worth).

And the Florida Education Association is backing Ben Diamond in the House District 68 contest.

The Dept. of Children and Families says that New Beginnings of Tampa did no wrong back in 2008, the second government investigation that has cleared the group after a series of damning articles were published by the Tampa Bay Times in late 2014.

Hillsborough County makes a move to preempt any civil unrest if things go sour between law enforcement and the community.

 

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Expand Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security, Charlie Crist says

Former Gov. Charlie Crist spent part of Tuesday morning visiting a housing development in the unincorporated Lealman area that was designed mostly for veterans and disabled veterans.

Charlie Crist Duval ParkCrist went to Duval Park to see for himself one solution to some of the obstacles veterans face when trying to return to private life. Those obstacles were at the forefront of a roundtable discussion he held Friday with a group of veterans.

What he found was a place one vet likened to “heaven.” But he found that, even in an earthly heaven, there are lot of needs — from funding shortfalls that leave veterans relying on food stamps, long waits to get disability payments from Veterans Affairs, and Medicare and Medicaid plans that don’t cover basic health needs, like dental care.

Additional funding for the VA, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security would help, he said.

“There’s a lot to be done,” Crist said. “It’s hard for me to understand why a member of Congress would not vote for increased allocations for veterans.”

Unfortunately, he said, political game playing is blocking the expansion of programs like Medicare and Medicaid that could help veterans and their families.

“It’s cruel, frankly,” Crist said. “But we will overcome it by being persistent.”

Charlie Crist Duval ParkCrist, a Democrat, is running for Congressional District 13 seat held by David Jolly. Jolly is facing a challenge in the Aug. 30 Republican primary from retired Gen. Mark Bircher. Crist will run against the winner in the Nov. 8 general election.

Duval Park was conceived about eight years ago as a housing complex in the largely poor Lealman area. It was the first venture into residential construction by the Sembler company. But after four houses were built, the project ground to a halt. Those homes stood vacant for years.

Last year, Blue Sky Communities bought the 10-acre site and re-envisioned it as an 88-unit housing site mostly for veterans and disabled veterans. The project has one-, two- and three-bedroom units that are leased to the veterans at substantially reduced rates. There is also a clubhouse, a pool with wheelchair access, and access to the next-door 38-acre Joe’s Creek Greenway Park.

It was backed in part by money and other support from the Pinellas County Housing Authority. Case management support is provided by the Boley Center and ServiceSource of Clearwater.

It began taking applications in October and people started moving in at the beginning of the year.

Paul Mabry, 58, said Duval Park has been a blessing. Mabry, am Army veteran, was injured while training on a mortar range. He’s missing a piece of his calf, and still has shrapnel in his foot and hip. The VA says he has a 10 percent disability. He was homeless for a short time before he found out about Duval Park from St. Vincent de Paul.

“What a blessing,” Mabry said. “There’s not an adjective in the English language that would do it justice.”

Mabry has been struggling since 1981 to have the VA rank his disability as more severe than 10 percent.

Craig Matthew McArthur, also 58, is a Navy veteran who was homeless for two-and-a-half to three years before finding out about Duval Park from St. Vincent de Paul. He had a heart attack while living on the streets. His heart condition is classified as chronic. He got a MRSA infection in his leg from the operation when they removed a vein to transplant to his heart.

Charlie Crist Duval Park“This is wonderful … heaven,” McArthur said. McArthur said he was never told until recently that he might have VA benefits.

The difficulties faced by Mabry, McArthur and others at Duval Park are why Crist said that, if elected, he would hire a veteran to be available to help usher other veterans through the process, to answer questions and to aid in getting them the help they need.

As for Duval Park, Crist said, “it’s beautiful.”

The problem, he said, is that there is not enough of it. It has a waiting list of 240 veterans who would like to live there.

“We need to expand the ability for more people to have this kind of opportunity,” Crist said.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

New hacker document dump incudes DCCC notes on CD 13 race

Files posted Monday by hacker group Guccifer 2.0 include internal documents from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) on congressional races in Florida.

They explicitly contain “campaign overviews” and “paths to victory” in Congressional Districts 7, 10, 13, 18 and 26.

The document related to the Pinellas County’s 13th Congressional District race is dated from April when Eric Lynn was still running against Charlie Crist for the Democratic nomination.

Lynn has since dropped out of the race and is now running for a state House seat.

The campaign document overview says this about CD 13:

The un-gerrymandering and elimination of minority-packed districts has changed the makeup of FL-13 making it much more favorable to Democrats. FL-13 is located entirely within Pinellas County, which is located on the western side of the Florida peninsula near Tampa Bay. The largest city in the district is St. Petersburg (colloquially “St. Pete”). The district is entirely within the Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater media market, which has a cost per point of $450 for candidates and $540 for issue campaigns. The Florida 13 will include Gov. Crist’s hometown of St. Petersburg, where he currently lives and spends much of his time. Eric Lynn is also a native of St. Pete.

It was written before CD 13 GOP incumbent David Jolly deciding to get back into the race, where he is expected to defeat retired Marine Brigadier General Mark Bircher in the primary election in two weeks. But it does have a few things to say about former Mayor Rick Baker, still rumored at the time to be considering a run for the Republican nomination.

— Rick Baker (Not announced but has been floated as potential R candidate).

— Attempted to withhold $2.3 million in pay raises from city workers, but received raises from City Council at 12:50 a.m. after television cameras left.

— Supported increase in utility fees.

— “Unsure” about whether he supported in-state tuition for children of undocumented immigrants.

The document also includes  a file on CD 10 candidate Bob Poe, presumably from one of his opponents, Val Demings. On the website, the file is listed “(from Demings)”and was prepared by True Stories Research.

“Poe’s time at the helm of the Florida Democratic Party can’t be described as anything but a disaster,” reads one sentence from the document. “Rather, his tenure spanned two of the most disastrous elections in Florida history and he received most of the blame for the outcomes and the state of the party, rightly or wrongly.”

Last Friday, Guccifer 2.0 released personal cell phone numbers and private email addresses of members of the DCCC. Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which on Friday night published members’ personal cell phone numbers and some private email addresses. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said Saturday that it triggered a series of “sick calls, voicemails and text messages.”

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Adam Putnam endorses David Jolly in CD 13

Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam is throwing his support behind Rep. David Jolly.

Putnam has endorsed Jolly in Florida’s 13th Congressional District. The endorsement comes just two weeks ahead of the Aug. 30 primary.

“David Jolly has a proven record of putting people before politics and his community’s interests before Washington’s,” said Putnam in a statement.

Putnam knows a thing or two about serving in Congress. Putnam spent 10 years representing Florida’s 12th Congressional District, stepping down in 2010 to run for Agriculture Commissioner. A lifelong Floridian, Putnam is widely believed to be gearing up for a 2018 gubernatorial bid.

“It’s an honor to have Commissioner Putnam’s support,” said Jolly in a statement. “He’s one of Florida’s greatest leaders, committed always to economic growth and individual liberty — a free market constitutionalist whose support is a true honor.”

While most of the focus has been on the likely match-up between Jolly and Democrat Charlie Crist in November, Jolly does face a primary challenger.

Jolly faces Mark Bircher in the Aug. 30 primary. The race marks the second time Bircher and Jolly will face off in a Republican primary. Bircher finished third behind Jolly and Kathleen Peters in special Republican primary in January 2014.

But Bircher faces an uphill battle in his quest to unseat Jolly. The Indian Shores Republican has received the backing of establishment Republicans, including former Gov. Jeb Bush and Rep. Vern Buchanan, the chairman of the Florida congressional delegation.

“David has demonstrated he has the capability to break through the dysfunction in Washington,” said Putnam. “He is without a doubt the right man for the job.”

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Charlie Crist says veterans’ services need more funding

Former Gov. Charlie Crist sat down with a group of veterans Friday to listen first-hand to their experiences and thoughts on how best to serve those who fought for the U.S.

“Some of the things we’ve touched on today are new to me,” Crist said.

Among those new issues are a lack of services geared to women veterans.

Among the new insights Crist said he gained was the disconnect that exists between the diagnosis of medical issues and the time it takes for the Veterans Affairs Department to decide whether a veteran will be classified as disabled and what benefits the veteran will receive.

A year appeared to be the average, the veterans said, but some knew of three-year waits for benefits.

“They want to fight the war, but they don’t want to pay for the consequences,” Bill Walker of Seminole said. Walker is a veteran of the Vietnam War.

“It sounds to me like there’s a probably a significant resources issue,” Crist said.

It’s great, he said, that the veterans stated that they could get medical appointments quickly and that the medical personnel and equipment are the best. But, Crist said, “if you are denied, denied, denied, what good is that? It is unconscionable that that should exist, particularly for you. … Justice delayed is justice denied.”

A related problem, Crist said, is the lack of an advocate for veterans who can help them maneuver through the system.  That’s something, he said, that a member of Congress could do by having a veteran on staff whose job was to help other veterans.

That idea of constituent service is a theme that Crist has frequently repeated at campaign stops.

Crist is running for the Congressional District 13 seat held by David Jolly. Jolly is also facing a challenge in the Aug. 30 Republican primary from retired Gen. Mark Bircher. Crist, a Democrat, will face the winner in the Nov. 8 general election.

The veterans at the roundtable discussion opposed privatizing the VA.

“That’s a horrible idea,” said one. “There would be no oversight. … It would be catastrophic. [The VA] is the only institution that can care for veterans.”

crist vets 2 crist vets

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Mitch Perry Report for 8.12.16 – DEA just says no to loosening pot restrictions

Advocates for both medical marijuana and the outright legalization of the herb were dealt a blow yesterday when the Drug Enforcement Administration rejected a bid to reconsider how it treats marijuana under federal drug control laws.

Along with much more serious drugs such as heroin and acid, pot is considered a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substance Act. The hope was that it was reclassified as a Schedule II drug, which is how speed and oxycodone are currently scheduled.

But no, said DEA head Chuck Rosenberg.

“This decision isn’t based on danger,” he said. “This decision is based on whether marijuana, as determined by the FDA, is a safe and effective medicine. And it’s not.”

As the Washington Post reports, the FDA has never approved whole-plant marijuana as a drug, and it may never do so, since most drugs the FDA approves of are individual chemical compounds, not plants.

“This is a vindication for science and for people who have said to go slow,” Kevin Sabet said. He’s a former  former Obama administration drug advisor who argued against legalizing  marijuana at debate at the University of Tampa a few years ago. “I think it’s a bad day for legalization efforts and a good day for scientists,” he added.

Meanwhile, the beat goes on. Florida (and Arkansas) will decide on medical marijuana at the polls this fall, and voters in Arizona, California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada will consider full legalization.

In other news…

That news we had yesterday about Tim Canova and Debbie Wasserman Schultz agreeing to a debate this Sunday morning? Never mind.  Actually, it’s back on.

DWS dismisses criticism against her by Canova and other critics as “garbage” in a new television ad for the voters in CD 23.

Brent King and Jan Schneider are battling it out to be the Democratic representative to challenge Vern Buchanan this fall in the CD 16 race.

David Jolly is the latest Florida lawmaker to call on Congress to end their summer recess for a day and vote to approve funding for the Zika virus.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons