Florida Archives - Page 5 of 51 - SaintPetersBlog

Sunshine State Award: Surprise! FSU’s Dalvin Cook wins it again

Dalvin Cook must be getting used to the recognition.

Once again, the Sunshine State Award is his.

Cook, the FSU running back who shattered the school’s all-time record last week against Syracuse, has won this honor several times. His 225, four-touchdown performance against the Orangemen is only the latest.

Cook faces a difficult week this week against the Florida Gators in what may be his final home game for the Seminoles.

Other players considered for the honor include: FSU quarterback Deondre Francois, who threw for 315 yards, Florida defensive lineman David Reese, who had 12 tackles against LSU, Florida running back Jordan Scarlett, who ran for 108 yards, Florida receiver Tyrie Clevealnd, who had three catches for 108 yards, Miami running back Mark Walton, who ran for 120 yards against N.C. State, USF’s Quinton Flowers, who combined for 330 yards of total offense against SMU, USF running back Marlon Mack, who rushed for 129 yards, USF receiver Tyre McCants, who caught three passes for 105 yards, UCF defensive lineman Tony Guerad, who had 12 tackles against Tulsa, FAU receiver Kalib Woods, who caught seven passes for 120 yards in a loss to Old Dominion and FIU’s running back combination of Anthony Jones (121 yards rushing) and Alex Gardner (119 yards rushing).

The Sunshine State awards are presented each week by the SaintPetersblog.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Florida’s offense, FSU’s defense face challenges in rivalry game

How in the world can Florida score enough points to beat FSU?

And how in the world can FSU play enough defense to beat Florida?

It’s the old movable object-resistible force debate. The poor Gators struggled mightily on offense — this is hardly fun nor a gun. The Seminoles play chase on defense.

So how can either team win?

You have to give credit to Gators’ coach Jim McElwain, who has found a way to win eight games with the nation’s 102nd ranked offense. Florida is 97th in American in running the ball and 81st in passing yards. Eighty-eight teams have scored more points.

But Florida’s defense (ranked fifth) has given the Gators wiggle-room. So far, Florida has won games with 13 points (Vandy), 16 points (LSU) and 20 points (South Carolina). LSU, for instance, outgained the Gators by 153 yards — but Florida found a way to win.

That will be the test again Saturday as the Gators try to slow running back Dalvin Cook and quarterback Deondre Francois.

FSU has played better defense lately, possibly because the quarterbacks haven’t been the challenge that LaMar Jackson, Deshaun Watson, Mitch Trubinsky, Brad Kaaya and Quinton Flowers were. Of course, Gators’ quarterback Austin Appleby doesn’t figure to pose a pass-them-silly challenge, either.

Like always, Florida will play defense, field position and wait for a break. It’s worked so far.

FSU will push the play a little more with its weapons, but ball control will be vital.

Game time Saturday is 8 p.m.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Gators beat LSU in rescheduled game after goal-line stand

This time, the storm hit the LSU Tigers. This time, the storm arrived in the players of the Florida Gators’ defense.

The Gators, in what was supposed to have been a home game before the venue was changed due to storms in October, stopped LSU on fourth-and-goal from the one with three seconds to play.

Florida (8-2) won the SEC East title with the 16-10 victory.

“It’s no small feat to go to that championship game back-to-back,” Florida coach Jim McElwain said. “I just can’t tell you how proud I am of our players, our staff and happy for the Gator fans that, you know, don’t think we’re very good, but all we do is end up back in Atlanta.

“So that’s pretty cool.”

LSU outgained Florida 423-270, but the Tigers lost two field goals and botched a punt. Then came the final series. LSU had a first-and-goal at the Florida seven, and moved to the one with 38 seconds to play. Two plays failed to gain, however.

The Gators conclude their regular season against FSU.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Five questions about the rescheduled Florida-LSU game

Five things to ponder about the Florida-LSU game:

1. With Jarrad Davis and Marcus Moye out, can the Florida defense stand up to the LSU attack?

It’ll have to. It’s hard to see Florida winning this game without a great defensive performance. You know, the kind of performance missing in the second half against Tennessee and in the Arkansas game. The Gators are third in the nation in defense, but LSU is 13th, which isn’t bad either.

2. Leonard Fournette rushed for 180 yards and two touchdowns in LSU’s narrow win over the Gators last year. Is stopping him the key?

Not anymore. Fournette is still a talented running back, but these days, the Tigers depend on another face, too. Sophomore Darren Guice (881) actually has more yards rushing than Fournette (803). Florida is 12th in the nation against the run, hinting this could be a low-scoring game.

3. Florida quarterback Austin Appleby once beat out LSU’s Danny Etling when both were at Purdue. Does that give the Gators an edge?

Maybe a small one. But LSU has an offense less dependent on its quarterback than Florida’s. The Gators will go in looking to break a big play behind running back Jordan Scarlett or wide receiver Antonio Callaway, but Florida has struggled on offense all season. Building a consistent offense has been the disappointing part of Jim McElwain‘s era. The Gators are ranked only 95th in the country.

4. Is Florida afraid of the game?

LSU linebacker Arden Keys says they are. He says the Gators postponed the first game because they were injured, and now, without all their stars, they’re afraid. (Florida’s players, of course, deny this).

So is that just more trash talking? We’ll see. Florida is the underdog in this game, but are they afraid? Doubtful.

5. Who’s playing for the most?

It’s a toss-up. With a victory, the Gators win the SEC East and get to the conference title game. But LSU’s players seem to like interim coach Ed Orgeron. A victory against Florida would help him in his quest to make the job assignment permanent.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

The Predictions: LSU’s running game aims at Florida’s defense

Most of the time, Florida’s defense has been excellent.

Most of the time, they’ve swarmed runners and draped receivers and put the heat on quarterbacks. Most of the time, they’ve led the way to victory.

Most of the time. But not always.

Florida’s defense was exploited in the second half of the Tennessee game, and throughout the game against Arkansas. That’s enough for questions as the Gators travel to LSU for their rescheduled game Saturday. The Gators are third nationally, and 12th against the run.

The running game, in particular, will post a challenge for Florida with Darren Guice and Leonard Fournette both closing in on 1,000-yard seasons. Guise needs 119 yards and Fournette needs 197.

Florida, again, will struggle with field position and the attempt to make big plays with the 95th-best offense in the nation.

Prediction: LSU 20, Florida 16

FSU at Syracuse

The Seminoles have all the advantages in this one against an outmanned Syracuse team that will probably be missing its best player in quarterback Eric Dungey.

FSU has played better defense lately, a streak they should continue against Syracuse’s backup quarterbacks. Between Deondre Francois, Dalvin Cook, and an emerging group of young receivers, FSU should win a comfortable game. Look for DeMarcus Ware to pad his sack totals (third in the country).

Prediction: FSU 40, Syracuse 14

Miami at N.C. State

When you’re talking about the nation’s teams that are better than their record, you might want to start with the Wolfpack, the hard-luck team of the ACC. This year, North Carolina State has lost by three points in overtime to Clemson, by four points to FSU and by seven points to Boston College.

Now comes Miami, which won last week to stop a four-game losing streak. For the Wolfpack, the key will be keeping the pass rush away from quarterback Ryan Finley. For Miami, it’s getting its offensive weapons free so quarterback Brad Kaaya, finally healthy, can be the difference.

Prediction: Miami 30, N.C. State 28.

USC at SMU

The Mustangs are a trap for the USF Bulls, who face rival UCF next week. If Quinton Flowers can be bottled up, and if SMU forces him to pitch, it could be a closer game than you’d think. Don’t forget: SMU beat Houston earlier this season.

Last week, SMU put up 55 points at East Carolina, a number that should make the shaky USF defense a bit nervous. Look out for Ke’Mon Freeman and Braeden West, who both went over 100 yards last year.

Prediction: USF 31, SMU 30

UCF at Tulsa

Few teams in the nation have had the turnaround that UCF has had this season. Still, taking on Tulsa is a tough task. Tulsa is eighth in the nation on offense.

In a year, UCF may be up for the task. Not this year, though.

Tulsa 30, UCF 17

Old Dominion at FAU

ODU is one of those schools that sounds smaller than it is. In actuality, the Monarchs have won three straight and hung up 51 on Southern Miss last week. They’re a tougher opponent than some might think.

FAU’s hope is that quarterback Jason Driskel stays hot. He’s thrown for 550 yards the last two weeks.

Prediction: Old Dominion 27, FAU 20

Marshall at FIU

The Panthers will try to catch the eye of incoming coach Butch Davis in this one, but it won’t be easy.

Quarterback Chase Litton of Marshall threw for four touchdowns last week, showing there is a little danger to the Thundering Herd despite a 3-7 record. Still, there should be a new energy to FIU. Look for quarterback Alex McGough to have a good night.

Prediction: FIU 21, Marshall 17

THE PROS

Tampa Bay at Kansas City

The Bucs won last week by taking the ball away from Chicago several times, but no one’s better at that than the Chiefs, who have won 17 of their last 19 at home. One of the league’s best secondaries awaits for quarterback Jameis Winston.

Prediction: Kansas City 24, Tampa Bay 13

Jacksonville at Detroit

In a year after Calvin Johnson left, the Lions were supposed to return to the basement. Instead, Matt Harrington has led Detroit to a share of the NFC Central lead. Jacksonville has played better that you’d think, though, and a good secondary gives the Jags a chance.

Prediction: Jacksonville 21, Detroit 20 (upset)

Miami at L.A. Rams

The Dolphins aren’t very good, but they have a defense capable of giving rookie quarterback Jared Cook a hard time in his first game. As always, Miami’s chances depend on whether it can spring running back Jay Ajayi.

Prediction: Los Angeles 20, Miami 16

 

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Football flashback: Bad weather has postponed Florida-LSU before

This isn’t the first time it stormed on the FloridaLSU football game.

When the teams get together Saturday for a makeup game, it should rekindle some memories for former Gators’ head coach Steve Spurrier. After all, Spurrier has been through it before.

It was 1964, and Spurrier was a sophomore when Hurricane Hilda went through Baton Rouge. That year, there was no change of venue; the teams simply played the game on Dec. 5.

LSU was ranked No. 7 in the nation going into the game, and therefore was a heavy favorite over a Florida team that had lost three times. But Spurrier led the Gators to a 20-6 victory. LSU still went on the win the Orange Bowl, while Florida stayed home.

This year, LSU is ranked No. 16. Florida is No. 21.

And Spurrier? He’s now a consultant for the Gator football team.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Bowl projections: Could Miami play Florida in the post-season?

The latest bowl projections have most of Florida’s teams facing the possibility of staying in-state for the post season.

With none of the schools figuring in the playoffs, most of ESPN’s latest projections still have some intriguing match-ups.

Start with UCF, which will play in Orlando’s Cure Bowl against Appalachian State on Dec. 17 (according to Mark Schlabach) or the Miami Beach Bowl (Dec. 19) against Ohio (according to Brett McMurphy).

USF is projected to play against Boston College in the St. Petersburg Bowl on Dec. 26 (Schlabach) or in the Birmingham Bowl (Dec. 29) against Ole Miss.

Miami could play either Minnesota (Dec. 28) in the Pinstripe Bowl or face Florida in Jacksonville’s Taxslayer Bowl on Dec. 31.

If Florida doesn’t play Miami, it is projected to play against Nebraska in Tampa’s Outback Bowl on Jan. 2.

FSU is projected to play either Wisconsin in the Orange Bowl on Dec. 30 or Tennessee in the Orlando Citrus Bowl on Dec. 31.

Again, the predictions are subject to change by the week.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Steve Schale: Florida 2016 in the rear view mirror

Give any Florida strategist with statewide experience the following data points: by 7:15 p.m., the Democratic candidate has a 10-point lead in Hillsborough, a 100K vote lead in Orange, a 200K vote lead in both Dade and Broward early voting, and is ahead in Duval, and everyone would think the same thing: that Democratic candidate is going to win. Certainly, that is what I thought, and what everyone, R and D, who texted me around that time thought too.

Back in October, I had looked at several different models. Most of them played out with a narrow Clinton win, one of them came back a tie (not in percentages — an actual raw vote tie), and in one of them, where I assumed in most counties that Trump would earn the higher of Romney or Bush 04 vote share, and in that one, Trump won by a point. I sent it to a few friends on both sides, who generally dismissed it. Going into Election Day, pretty much everything was lining up with one of the models that had her headed to about 1.5-2-point win.

I have a plan every election night: check Pasco early vote, then hit refresh until Hillsborough, Pinellas, Duval, Orange, Dade and Broward report, followed by a swing through I-4 suburban and exurbancounties. Sure, the initial Pasco and Pinellas numbers didn’t look too good, but they looked survivable, especially considering pretty much everything else was at or above my target. Then I went and looked at Volusia … Hernando … Brevard … Sarasota … Polk … then back to Pasco. The last of my models was more than playing out.

I slammed down the rest of my beer, and called a buddy in Brooklyn to report the bad news. It was done. CNN could have called it at 8:00 EST, she wasn’t winning Florida. In fact, looking back at my texts, I told a guy at CNN around 8:15 EST that it was done.

Despite my optimism going into Election Day, in my gut, I knew this could happen. As many folks heard me say over the last few years, while I am a big believer — and still am — that demographic trends work in the Democratic Party’s favor, all of this hinges on the Democratic candidate maintaining a reasonable floor with white voters. Frankly, it was a big part of why I was a big proponent of the vice president running. As I told CNN’s “The Lead” in late August 2015 about Biden: “I live in the swing state of Florida. If you look at the way Democrats have struggled with working class, working white voters primarily … he gives us a chance to talk to some voters in the general election that we’ve struggled with the last few cycles.”

President Obama had some reach with these voters, or at least enough for us to win. In 2008, we knew we had to hit 40 with whites, in 2012, we needed to get close to it. For Secretary Clinton, it meant maintaining President Obama’s numbers with whites from 2012. As you will see in a few minutes, she clearly didn’t — not only here, but throughout the country.

So, let’s start with a couple of Florida factoids:

*2016 marked the fourth straight statewide election (two Governors, two Presidentials), where the victor’s margin of victory was roughly a point.

*And just to drive home the point of Florida’s competitiveness — when you go back to 1992, the year where Florida became a true battleground state, there have been more than 50 million votes cast for President, and Republicans and Democrats are separated by 12,000 votes. No, that isn’t a typo — 12,000 votes, or right at 0.02 percent.

*Trump set the new high water mark for Republican vote share in 40 of Florida’s 67 counties.

So, what happened?

I often will describe Florida as a scale. Take the GOP markets (North Florida markets + Fort Myers) and in a neutral year, it will balance out the Dem markets (Miami and West Palm), and more or less, the race balances of the fulcrum of I-4. Because of the Democratic trends in Miami-Dade, the math has changed a bit: Democrats can now count on bigger margins out of their markets than the GOP can out of theirs, and thus can still win even if they lose I-4 by a little bit. This was the Obama 2012 path: the president carried a margin of about 550K votes out of his base markets, Romney was about 410K out of his, and even though Romney narrowly carried both I-4 markets, it wasn’t enough.

Which is a good way to frame the “Things that didn’t cost Hillary Florida” section:

Base turnout: Both Broward and Dade county had higher turnout rates, and the Miami media market had a higher margin for Clinton than Obama. And even with Palm Beach coming in a little short, she won her two base markets by about 75K more votes than Obama 2012, and won a slightly higher share of the vote. Broward and Dade alone combines for a 580K vote margin, and honestly, I think around 600K is pretty close to maxing out.

The Panhandle

 True, Trump did win the “I-10 corridor” by more votes than Romney, but it wasn’t significant. His 345K vote margin as slightly better than Romney’s 308K, and pretty much in line with Bush 04’s 338K North Florida vote majority. And frankly, Clinton succeeded in the major North Florida objective: keep #Duuuval County close. Trump’s 6,000 vote plurality in Duval County was the best Democratic performance in a presidential election since Carter won Duval in 1976.

Hispanics

It is true that Hispanics underperformed out west, but here in Florida, she did considerably better than Obama in the exit polls — polls that are reflective in the record margins she posted in the heavily Hispanic areas of Miami-Dade, Broward, Orange and Osceola.

SW Florida

This was the GOP talking point during early vote: SW Florida was blowing up for Trump. And they were right, it did. But SW Florida typically has exceptionally high turnout, and high GOP margins, and in the end, Trump’s total was only about 40K votes bigger than Romney.

In fact, if you add up the 8 “partisan” markets, which make up 55 percent of the statewide vote, the 2016 election was basically a repeat of 2012. Trump’s margin was less than 2,000 votes better than Romney.

It was rural Florida: Trump did very well in rural Florida, but so did Romney. If you take all the counties with less than 250,000 residents, he increased Romney’s vote share by 125,000 votes — enough to make up the Obama 2012 margin — except, Clinton increased Obama’s margin in the counties with more than 750,000 residents by over 100,000 votes. In other words, rural and suburban cancel each other out. What doesn’t cancel out — midsize suburban/exurban counties, places with 250,000-750,000 residents — Trump won them by 200,000 more votes than Romney

One more reason HRC ‘cannibalized’ her vote early, in other words, had all the typical Democrats vote early, and lost because there were just simply that many more Republicans left to vote. Here is why this one is tricky.

HRC ‘cannibalized’ her vote early, in other words, had all the typical Democrats vote early, and lost because there were just simply that many more Republicans left to vote. Here is why this one is tricky.

First, Republicans have a lot more “reliable voters” in that, they have fewer voters that drop-off in the midterm elections. Democrats have more “potential voters” — in other words, unreliable or first-time voters. During early voting, GOP had over 200K more “three of three” voters — in other words, people who voted in 2014, 2012, and 2010 who voted early than Democrats, but the Dems had a lot more infrequent voters. And yes, the Dems had more “2012 voters” who voted early, but they also just had more 2012 voters.

Going into Election Day, GOP still had more than 100K “three of three” voters to vote, which alone wasn’t enough to get him to the kind of win he had. However, if you looked at just people who voted in 2012, the GOP edge was just 40K. In other words, had the 2012 voters all voted, the Dem early voting margin would have remained. We don’t yet know who exactly voted on Election Day, but what we do know is the GOP really surged, and Dems didn’t.

In fact, in 10 of the 11 counties where Trump most increased the vote margins from Romney, his vote share (not margin) was at least 6.3 percent higher on Election Day than during early voting — and in six of the 11, the increase was at least 8.2 percent. For example, Trump won 53.8 percent of the Polk County early vote but won 62.6 percent of the Election Day vote — an increase in his share of 8.8 percent. In other words, in some of these counties, Trump was winning Election Day by 15 points more than he won early voting.

And this didn’t just happen in counties where Trump won. Even base Democratic counties saw this Trump surge. Take Broward County, where Trump won less than 30 percent of the early votes, he won over 40 percent on Election Day, or Orange County, where she won early voting by more than 30 points and racked up an almost 120K vote lead, only to watch Trump cut her Election Day only margin to 17K votes. In my last memo, I described what I thought Trump’s Election Day challenge was in golf terms — a 250 yard shot over water. Turns out, he did have that shot. Simply, he crushed her on Election Day.

So, where did he beat her? Simple: I-4, and more specifically, the 15 counties that make up suburban and exurban I-4.

Quick recap: The I-4 corridor is roughly defined as the Tampa and Orlando media markets. If you are a Democrat, win here, and you win. If you are a Republican, win big here, and you win. Given that the rest of the state in 2016 generally looked like 2012, Trump needed to win big here.

But that wasn’t necessarily easy. The urban core in the Orlando market (Orange, Osceola and Seminole counties), is getting more Democratic quickly. In fact, in these three counties alone, Hillary Clinton extended President Obama’s 2012 margins by over 65,000 votes. So, not only does Trump must win the I-4 markets by 75,000 votes more than Romney did in 2012 just to win, he needs to find 65,000 more to make up for urban Orlando.

Well, he did, and more. Trump won the I-4 markets by more than 250K votes. Where Romney won the two-party vote share on I-4 by 2 points, Trump won it by 6 — including winning the Tampa market by 9 points.

But it was even more granular than this. If you break up the markets into two buckets: urban counties (Hillsborough, Pinellas, Orange, Osceola and Seminole), and nonurban counties, the Trump path to victory — and the challenge for Democrats, becomes even clearer.

Despite losing Pinellas County — and Trump’s significant gains there, Hillary Clinton won “urban I-4” by some 200K votes, which was more than Obama in 2008 or Obama in 2012. These counties account for about 48 percent of the votes on the I-4 corridor.

In the other 15, which make up the other 52 percent the region’s votes, Donald Trump won by 450K votes. By comparison, Romney won these counties by 220K votes, and McCain by 130K. In other words, pretty much the entire rest of the state’s election balanced out just like 2012, except one glaring place: suburban/exurban I-4. If you look back at 2004, you will see a similar dynamic.

Here are a few examples:

Pasco
2008: McCain +7,687
2012: Romney +14,164
2016: Trump +51,899

Volusia
2008: Obama +13,857
2012: Romney +2,742
2016: Trump: +33,970

Hernando
2008: McCain +3,135
2012: Romney +7,108
2016: Trump: 26,860

I could go on like this for a while

Overall, Trump won the Orlando market by slightly more than Romney, which is pretty remarkable given Clinton’s strength in the core of Orlando. The Tampa market was solidly Trump. Winning the two-party vote share by 9 points. The rule of Tampa picking Presidents was once again true.

What is interesting is this is also the place where we saw the closest thing to a GOP turnout surge. Of these 15 counties, all but three of them saw turnout rates above 2012, with most seeing their turnout rates up 3-5 points. While these counties are economically entirely different, they are almost universally less diverse than the state at-large. We won’t know exactly who voted on Election Day for a few more weeks, but I would bet we will see some increase in infrequent white voters of all parties to help drive those margins.

Overall, turnout was a bit all over the place this year. The I-10 markets were a smaller share of the vote than 2012, and Orlando was much higher. But within markets, you can see the exurban/suburban thing play out. That being said, Democrats can’t blame this on turnout.

I also think there is an element here of Clinton losing the turnout fight in these places. These were the communities that were not getting a ton of field support (note, I didn’t say none), but were places that Americans for Prosperity were heavily invested in behalf of Rubio. I’ve worried for some time that the “Trump has no ground game” narrative could slowly seep toward complacency, and we might have seen the proof of this in these areas. I wrote about this in a piece on May, when I suggested Trump could win the same way Scott won. Well, it happened.

So what comes next? Well, I will write more on that subject coming soon, but for some of us old guys, we will recognize the 2016 map as very similar to the 2004 map. In the two cycles that followed, Democrats won two statewide races, plus the presidency, and picked up numerous seats in the Congress and Legislature? How? By reaching back into these communities and restarting the conversation. In Florida, the basic rule winning is managing margins, particularly in suburban and exurban I-4. In 04, Bush did it and won. In 08 and 12, Obama won that battle. In 16, Trump did.

And again, this isn’t just a Florida deal — what happened here isn’t isolated. But I will make this one point — one I’ve made a lot over the last few years: if Democrats in Florida can win around 40 percent of the white vote — which is less than what Obama won in 2008, they will win almost every statewide race going forward. Demographics can be destiny — but it isn’t automatically.

Lastly, to the organizers on both sides — stay in the fight. If you were for Trump, go be a part of the solution. President Obama told his 2008 organizers to go make their own solutions — you should too. For the Clinton organizers, get up off the mat. There are more fights ahead and more chances to contribute.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Florida sees greatest annual increase in population since 2006

Florida is going through a growth spurt.

The Sunshine State’s population grew by 333,471 between April 1, 2015 and April 1, 2016. That marks the greatest annual increase in residents since 2006, according to a report by the Office of Economic and Demographic Research.

The state’s population was more than 20.1 million as of April 1. The estimate is slightly lower than a recent estimate from the U.S. Census Bureau, which reported Florida’s population was about 20.2 million as of July 1, 2015.

Florida’s population has been driven largely by net migration, with more people moving into the state than leaving. But net migration fell to record lows during 2008 and into 2009, accounting for just shy of 26 percent of population growth in fiscal 2008-09.

Those low levels of net migration were “largely due to national economic conditions.” More simply: The Great Recession meant folks just weren’t moving to Florida.

That didn’t mean Florida wasn’t growing. The U.S. Census Bureau reported in 2014 that the state’s population was about 19.9 million, stealing the No. 3 spot from New York, which that year reported a population of 19.7 million.

And don’t expect the streets to get any less crowded. The Office of Economic and Demographic Research estimates annual population change will remain above 300,000 net new residents each year for the next five years.

The state estimates the population will grow to more than 20.4 million by April 1, 2017, an increase of about 330,000. That steady growth is expected to continue, with more than 21.7 million expected to be living in Florida by April 1, 2021.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Marijuana reform went 8 for 9 on the ballot; is it at a tipping point?

After marijuana amendments passed in eight of the nine states where it was on the ballot Tuesday, now nearly a quarter of all Americans live in states where recreational use of marijuana is legal.

Voters in California, Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada approved recreational marijuana amendments last week, giving nearly 50 million more Americans the right to use marijuana.

Additionally, Florida, Arkansas, and North Dakota voted in favor of medical marijuana amendments, while Montana residents voted to roll back restrictions on their medical marijuana laws put in place by their state Legislature.

Arizona was the only state where marijuana failed on the ballot in 2016. The southwestern state already has medical marijuana laws on the books, but voters shot down a measure to legalize recreational use.

Once these amendments go into effect, eight states will have fully legalized marijuana, including the whole of the west coast, while 28 states and the District of Columbia will have legalized medical marijuana.

Marijuana’s ballot success this year could have pushed the drug past the tipping point when it comes to how the federal government enforces drug laws.

The new amendments also will mean an additional 68 members of the U.S. House of Representatives will come from states where recreational marijuana is legal, 53 from California alone.

President Barack Obama said the swing toward marijuana legalization — both for medical and recreational use — may make strict drug policies untenable for federal law enforcement agencies.

“You’ll now have a fifth of the country that’s operating under one set of laws and four-fifths in another,” he said in an interview with Bill Maher. “The Justice Department, DEA, FBI, for them to try to straddle and figure out how they’re supposed to enforce laws in some places and not in others … that is not going to be tenable.”

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons