Kendrick Meek Archives - Page 5 of 32 - SaintPetersBlog

Washington Post: Jeff Greene touts business savvy, outsider status in run for U.S. Senate seat

The Washington Post offers its most comprehensive profile to-date of Senate candidate Jeff Greene.

“We’re flying right over our house!” Greene said excitedly. “See the one with the swimming pool right on the water, with the tennis court behind it? That’s our house!”

In any other year, Florida voters might have written off the frenetic, unpolished candidacy of the 55-year-old billionaire as yet another footnote in the list of fabulously rich businessmen who self-fund a run for higher office in midlife. Voters may still do just that.

But Greene’s campaign for the Democratic nomination is looking less quixotic by the day. For the August primary, he has spent more than $4 million on advertising, including in media markets outside of Florida, and has caught up in the polls with four-term congressman Kendrick Meek, a political scion with the party’s backing. Greene has hired the political consultants behind John Edwards’s 2008 presidential campaign and the pollster behind New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, an independent. The plane — replete with polished wood paneling, bed, sofa and kitchenette — served a political point: Greene’s wealth meant he was beyond the establishment and couldn’t be bought.

Floridians, he hopes, will see him as a credible insurgent and jobs creator with a compelling story. He also hopes that they overlook a few milestones in his unusual biography.  Continue reading here.

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A memo to Kendrick Meek

Kenneth Quinnell, the uber-smart new media director for the Kendrick Meek campaign, recently asked a few of us in the blogging community for feedback on “on the candidate, the campaign and our new media outreach efforts.”

While I am sure Ken would have preferred for me to deliver my counsel privately, I wouldn’t tell him anything privately that I wouldn’t write on this blog.  So here goes:

Dear Kenneth:

Let me begin by commending you for continuing to reach out to the new media community.  I am sure the last thing you all need right now is more advice.  In this situation, I am reminded of the scene where Caspar warns Tom not to say ‘I told you so’ which Tom promises not to say, but ends up doing so anyway.

It’s not that I told you so or that I am any more right than anyone else who has criticized the campaign. Actually, I agree with Adam Smith’s assessment that, quietly, Kendrick Meek had been running a solid campaign that no one seemed to be noticing.

I just don’t think a quiet, solid campaign is enough to win in these turbulent times.

That’s why it is so interesting to see how the Kendrick Meek Campaign has operated over the last month. It’s operated as if it finally really cared what Democrats, especially Democrats who don’t live in South Florida, think about the campaign.

To me, this failure to lock up all of the Democratic Party has been and is the Achilles’ Heal of Kendrick Meek’s campaign.  There are 40,000 African Americans in St. Petersburg and just as many in Orlando and Tampa and those votes are not locked up.  There are thousands of urban liberals along the I-4 campaign  and those voters are not locked up.  That’s why white Democratic elected officials like Bill Heller and Janet Long have yet to endorse Kendrick — because their constituents have yet to endorse him either.

Anther faction of the Democratic Party that Kendrick Meek has yet to lock up is the Netroots.  And this was suppose to be his strength, especially with the signing of Kenneth Quinnell.  Yet, despite Quinnell’s efforts and hard work, the liberal blogintelligensia is not firmly behind Meek. Sure, some of the most liberal bloggers are with Meek, but certainly not the majority.  The Reid Report, Opinion Matters, Pushing Rope, Recreating Tampa, (my) Saint Petersblog…all of these sites have remained dangerously neutral.

And this neutrality has impacted the media coverage, or lack thereof, that the campaign receives.  Whereas if you look at Marco Rubio’s campaign, it is all but fueled by the posts, tweets and words of the blogosphere.

So what can Kendrick Meek do about these two situations — just two of several — I don’t know.  Certainly having Jeff Greene in the race was the best and worst thing to happen to Meek.  Best because Greene’s candidacy seems to have inspired Meek to finally take off the gloves.  Worst because Meek may end up losing the election.

In the end, I think the real problem for Kendrick Meek’s campaign is that Kendrick is listening to many of the same people that have lost election after statewide election here in Florida.  In case, you guys hadn’t noticed, the Florida Democratic Party is not poised to have a banner year.  With the exception of Scott Arcineaux and Eric Jotkoff, I don’t know if anyone in Tallahassee knows what the hell they are doing.

So, Congressman Meek, if you don’t do something dramatic now, when you are at 14% in the polls, about to be overtaken by Jeff Greene, you will end up losing.  If not in August, then in November.

A few bullet-point suggestions?

Get out of South Florida and come to Tampa Bay.  Now.   Rent a hotel and stay here for a week.  Not a day. Not a couple of events.  But a week, at least.  Camp out in Midtown St. Petersburg and inner Tampa and hammer home your base in the African American community.  I know these neighborhoods and I know that, right now, you’ll only win them with seventy or eighty percent of the vote, not the ninety-five percent you’ll need to win in November.

While you’re in Tampa Bay, recognize that Tampa is not St. Pete or Pinellas.  There are hundreds of thousands of voters in Pinellas and your indifference has ceded them to Charlie Crist.

Buy the blogosphere.  Ten or twenty grand in advertising spread among twenty blogs would gain you a cadre of shock troops that you’ll desperately need in the coming months.  I’ll make a deal with you.  If you advertise on the other 14 major liberal blogs, you don’t have to on Saint Petersblog (unless you really want to), just so long as you do it.

Finally, never, ever get to the point in a debate where things turn in to an exchange of ‘Yo Mama’ lines, which is what occurred on Tuesday.

Respectfully,

Peter Schorsch

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Jon Ausman endorses Jeff Greene

Momentum continues to grow for Democrat Jeff Greene following the Palm Beach Post debate. Today, Greene received the endorsement of state Democratic National Committee member, Jon Ausman, former West Palm Beach county commissioner and former West Palm Beach mayor, Carol Roberts, and former Wilton Manors city commissioner and first openly gay African-American elected official in the state, Joe Angelo.

“After watching the debate, I am convinced that Jeff Greene is the Democrat we need representing the people of Florida in Washington,” said DNC member Jon Ausman. “Jeff Greene has the experience to create jobs and get real results.”

“As a life-long Democrat, I strongly endorse my fellow Democrat, Jeff Greene, for Unites States Senate,” said former West Palm Beach county commissioner and former West Palm Beach mayor, Carol Roberts. “I trust Jeff Greene will create jobs that our state and country needs and will not be beholden to the special interests.”

“I’m proud to endorse Democrat Jeff Greene for U.S. Senate because he will revitalize Florida’s economy with good paying jobs, he’ll protect our environment and increase access to quality education,” said former Wilton Manors city commissioner, Joe Angelo. “I wholeheartedly support Jeff Greene for United States Senator.”

The endorsements come on the heels of the Palm Beach Post debate where Jeff Greene went toe-to-toe with failed career politician Kendrick Meek and a recent Quinnipiac poll that shows Greene in a statistical tie with his Democratic opponent.

“I’m honored to have the support of Mr. Ausman, Ms. Roberts and Mr. Angelo, who are leaders in the Democratic Party and in their community,” said Greene. “As U.S. senator, I will revitalize Florida’s economy, create jobs, and get real results. I am the only candidate who is an outsider, has successfully created jobs and won’t take a penny from any special interest and will always put Florida first.”

Jeff Greene is the Democratic candidate that if elected will work to create jobs, protect a woman’s right to choose, strengthen environmental laws, repeal Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, won’t take a penny of special interest money and will donate his salary to charities in Florida.

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St. Petersburg Times editorial: Jeff Greene and Kendrick Meek are ‘two seriously flawed candidates’

If there is any doubt that the St. Petersburg Times intends to lend its considerable weight to Charlie Crist’s campaign, then just read today’s editorial in which the editorial board writes, “Jeff Greene and U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek of Miami [were] entertaining, enlightening — and entirely disappointing all at the same time. These are two seriously flawed candidates, and Democrats have a difficult choice to make just two months from today.”

The lowlights of the editorial:

“The decision comes down to how much weight should be given to the considerable baggage each candidate carries.”

“Meek asks voters to make an extraordinary leap of faith.”

“The issue is Meek’s credibility, and further investigation is warranted.”

“A year ago, Meek expected to glide to the Democratic nomination for Senate. Greene has made it a race by spending $4 million on television ads, and he is a viable alternative in a year when voters are fed up with incumbents and conventional politics. In such an atmosphere, Meek’s emphasis of his Democratic roots and his criticism of Greene as a former Republican are oddly out of touch. The reality is that outside South Florida, neither candidate is a familiar name as they court a disenchanted electorate. Democrats ultimately will have to decide between a candidate whose blemishes are clear and one whose warts may not all be evident by Election Day.”

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St. Petersburg Times editorial: Jeff Greene and Kendrick Meek are ‘two seriously flawed candidates’

If there is any doubt that the St. Petersburg Times intends to lend its considerable weight to Charlie Crist’s campaign, then just read today’s editorial in which the editorial board writes, “Jeff Greene and U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek of Miami was entertaining, enlightening — and entirely disappointing all at the same time. These are two seriously flawed candidates, and Democrats have a difficult choice to make just two months from today.”

The lowlights of the editorial:

“The decision comes down to how much weight should be given to the considerable baggage each candidate carries.”

“Meek asks voters to make an extraordinary leap of faith.”

“The issue is Meek’s credibility, and further investigation is warranted.”

“A year ago, Meek expected to glide to the Democratic nomination for Senate. Greene has made it a race by spending $4 million on television ads, and he is a viable alternative in a year when voters are fed up with incumbents and conventional politics. In such an atmosphere, Meek’s emphasis of his Democratic roots and his criticism of Greene as a former Republican are oddly out of touch. The reality is that outside South Florida, neither candidate is a familiar name as they court a disenchanted electorate. Democrats ultimately will have to decide between a candidate whose blemishes are clear and one whose warts may not all be evident by Election Day.”

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Jack Seiler, six other Broward mayors, endorse Kendrick Meek in Senate race

From the Sun-Sentinel: Kendrick Meek’s U.S. Senate campaign plans to roll out more endorsements on Thursday, including Fort Lauderdale Mayor Jack Seiler.

Seiler is a close political friend of Gov. Charlie Crist, the former Republican now running for the Senate with no party affiliation.

The Democratic Party was a stronger tug for Seiler, who is supporting Meek in his primary fight with Palm Beach billionaire Jeff Greene.

Besides Seiler, the Meek campaign plans to announce endorsements of six other Broward mayors: Scott Brook of Coral Springs, Peggy Noland of Deerfield Beach, Barrington Russell of Lauderdale Lakes, Joseph Varsallone of Margate, Jack Brady of North Lauderdale and Eric Jones from West Park.

During the Senate debate on Tuesday, Meek said he had endorsements of 230 elected officials from around the state.

Greene, so far, has only one: state Rep. Joseph Abruzzo, D-Wellington.

Seiler’s statement:

“Kendrick Meek has always led by rolling up his sleeves and getting the job done. Kendrick stands with and for people who work hard to better their community through hands on action. Kendrick Meek is committed to the economic growth of our cities, and the diverse neighborhoods and communities throughout Broward County will be better off with Kendrick giving voice to our concerns. We need a leader like Kendrick and I know that when elected, he will be a fighter for us.”

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Charlie Crist looks to Democrats for campaign dollars

A must-read from Steve Bousquet:

By bolting from the Republican Party, Gov. Charlie Crist has one place left to raise big money in his race for the U.S. Senate: Democrats.

A governor who once courted conservatives by calling himself a “Jeb Bush Republican” is getting help from liberal trial lawyers, union activists and even elected Democrats, who are shunning their party’s Senate hopefuls, wealthy Palm Beach businessman Jeff Greene and U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek of Miami.

Crist is now an independent, with no party to pay campaign overhead or raise money.

Many Republicans had already given Crist the maximum $4,800 to help amass his $10-million campaign fund before he abandoned the GOP ship in April when polls showed him getting swamped by Marco Rubio in a Republican primary.

In Tallahassee two weeks ago, civil trial lawyer Lance Block hosted a Crist fundraiser at his home that prominent Republicans also attended.

“We need more people like Charlie Crist in Washington to set aside the partisan bickering,” said Block, a delegate to three Democratic presidential conventions who played a key role in helping Al Gore during the 2000 Florida vote recount. Continue reading here.

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Actually, Kendrick, err, Congressman Meek, you did not ‘win’ the debate

First and foremost, let me get this off my chest: During a debate, Kendrick Meek should not be addressed as “Kendrick” as Jeff Greene did over and over again yesterday.  And Congressman Meek should definitely not be addressed as “Kendrick” with the kind of contempt Jeff Greene did not even attempt to contain.  As Republican consultant Rick Wilson tweeted yesterday: “Wow…the unspoken word in Greene’s statement was ‘boy’ “

Now that that is addressed, let’s deal with Kendrick, err, Congressman Meek’s boast that he “won” yesterday’s debate.  The last thing Meek did yesterday was “win.”  I can make the argument that Meek lost just having to debate Greene, that’s how shaky his once sure-fire lock on the Democratic nomination has become.  But as one reader points out, Meek’s campaign took some poetic license when it claimed victory just minutes after the end of yesterday’s debate.

I was reading through this press release and realized it was cherry pickin’ at its finest.

The South Florida Sun-Sentinel quotes from Anthony Man’s are taken completely out of context. The “dramatic” moment is explained much better in his actual story, lengthier and more substantive in nature. Man does not say Kendrick Meek won the debate. In fact, he specifically avoids doing so by noting that Meek’s people declared themselves winners. Instead, he offers a fairly balanced review of the debate itself.

The snippets taken from David Catanese’s piece in Politico are also cherry-picked. Catanese’s piece was less detailed than Man’s, yet it, too, was a balanced review of the morning’s debate. Catanese moderated one of the Halter-Lincoln primary debates last month in Arkansas and is a pretty solid writer and commentator. He, too, did not declare Kendrick Meek the winner of this debate. On the contrary, he writes:

“While Meek attempted to portray Greene as an untrustworthy Johnny-come-lately to Democratic politics, Greene kept Meek on the defensive for much of the debate and avoided any significant gaffes.”

Here’s what Joy-Ann Reid of the Reid Report actually wrote with respect to the debate’s winner:

“It’s tough to call a winner on this one. Both men gave as good as they got, Meek landed the point that he is the only one of his four opponents who “has never run as a Republican,” and Greene  helped him out by using more than a few GOP talking points, on immigration (“with all of our technology, how could 11 to 15 million illegal immigrants get into our country?”), and on the economy, where he denied that the stimulus — the centerpiece of the Obama launch — is working. Those things he may live to regret, as he courts Democratic voters.

Because it came so close to the end, and because it so threw Greene off his game, Meek’s mom defense probably gave him the edge in the debate, or at least a stronger close. And he put Greene on the defensive over his Democratic bona fides to the point where Greene felt he had to play the “I’m from Massachusetts and grew up with Bobby Kennedy” card. But Greene came across as knowledgeable for a political neophyte, and dogged in pursuit of his talking points.

Similarly, Adam Smith’s (and Beth Reinhard’s) actual analysis of the debate differs from the snippet the Meek press release includes about the back and forth over each candidate’s carbon footprint. Smith and Reinhard write:

“For a real estate mogul who has never served in public office going up against a seasoned politician, Greene held his own. Both had awkward moments; both scored with one-liners.”

The press release also cites Andrew Abramson, a writer for the Palm Beach Post (and West Palm Beat). The quote from the press release:

“If you don’t know much about Jeff Greene, you’re not alone.”

I tried to look this quote up on Google and didn’t find an article link. What I did find was Mr. Abramson’s Twitter page, which includes this live-tweet:

If you don’t know much about Jeff Greene, you’re not alone.

Here’s his site http://bit.ly/9ozBcj We’re about to learn more #flsen #pbdb8

This is an absolutely egregious misappropriation of a reporter’s tweet by the Meek communications office. They just cut the last part of his tweet off! Mr. Abramson, along with the other writers at the Palm Beach Post, was merely informing his Twitter followers about Jeff Greene’s candidacy. He was getting them up to speed in case they hadn’t been following the primary contest previously. It’s pretty clear that Abramson’s Tweet was not an indication that he thought Jeff Greene lost the debate and Kendrick Meek was the victor.

Abramson did contribute to a Michael Bender piece in the Palm Beach Post. That piece, like the others, was a balanced review of the debate. Bender does not declare a winner or loser in the debate.

This tactic was repeated with respect to the Beth Reinhard quote. It is actually a live Tweet from the debate. Her article with Adam Smith, as I discussed earlier, did not declare a winner. Again, this was a Tweet taken out of context; Reinhard tweeted about one exchange within the debate.

The News Service of Florida article also does not declare a winner of the debate.

The remaining quotes were taken from blogs and do not warrant further inquiry. It’s pretty clear here that Kendrick Meek’s staffers declared victory based on quotes taken out of context. This is a fairly ridiculous attempt to spin the results of the debate.  The credible political writers in this state all wrote of a contentious, nasty, yet engaging contest between two candidates. They carefully documented the blows Greene and Meek delivered to one another. Not one of them declared Meek the winner. That much is clear.

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Actually, Kendrick, err, Congressman Meek, you did not ‘win’ the debate

First and foremost, let me get me this off my chest: During a debate, Kendrick Meek should not be addresses as “Kendrick” as Jeff Greene did over and over again yesterday.  And Congressman Meek should definitely not be addressed as “Kendrick” with the kind of contempt Jeff Greene did not even attempt to contain.  As Republican consultant Rick Wilson tweeted yesterday: “Wow…the unspoken word in Greene’s statement was ‘boy’ “

Now that that is addressed, let’s deal with Kendrick, err, Congressman Meek’s boast that he “won” yesterday’s debate.  The last thing Meek did yesterday was “win.”  I can make the argument that Meek lost just having to debate Greene, that’s how shaky his once sure-fire lock on the Democratic nomination has become.  But as one reader points out, Meek’s campaign took some poetic license when it claimed victory just minutes after the end of yesterday’s debate.

I was reading through this press release and realized it was cherry pickin’ at its finest.

The South Florida Sentinel quotes from Anthony Man’s are taken completely out of context. The “dramatic” moment is explained much better in his actual story, lengthier and more substantive in nature. Man does not say Kendrick Meek won the debate. In fact, he specifically avoids doing so by noting that Meek’s people declared themselves winners. Instead, he offers a fairly balanced review of the debate itself.

The snippets taken from David Catanese’s piece in Politico are also cherry-picked. Catanese’s piece was less detailed than Man’s, yet it, too, was a balanced review of the morning’s debate. Catanese moderated one of the Halter-Lincoln primary debates last month in Arkansas and is a pretty solid writer and commentator. He, too, did not declare Kendrick Meek the winner of this debate. On the contrary, he writes:

“While Meek attempted to portray Greene as an untrustworthy Johnny-come-lately to Democratic politics, Greene kept Meek on the defensive for much of the debate and avoided any significant gaffes.”

Here’s what Joy-Ann Reid of the Reid Report actually wrote with respect to the debate’s winner:

“It’s tough to call a winner on this one. Both men gave as good as they got, Meek landed the point that he is the only one of his four opponents who “has never run as a Republican,” and Greene  helped him out by using more than a few GOP talking points, on immigration (“with all of our technology, how could 11 to 15 million illegal immigrants get into our country?”), and on the economy, where he denied that the stimulus — the centerpiece of the Obama launch — is working. Those things he may live to regret, as he courts Democratic voters.

Because it came so close to the end, and because it so threw Greene off his game, Meek’s mom defense probably gave him the edge in the debate, or at least a stronger close. And he put Greene on the defensive over his Democratic bona fides to the point where Greene felt he had to play the “I’m from Massachusetts and grew up with Bobby Kennedy” card. But Greene came across as knowledgeable for a political neophyte, and dogged in pursuit of his talking points.

Similarly, Adam Smith’s (and Beth Reinhard’s) actual analysis of the debate differs from the snippet the Meek press release includes about the back and forth over each candidate’s carbon footprint. Smith and Reinhard write:

“For a real estate mogul who has never served in public office going up against a seasoned politician, Greene held his own. Both had awkward moments; both scored with one-liners.”

The press release also cites Andrew Abramson, a writer for the Palm Beach Post (and West Palm Beat). The quote from the press release:

“If you don’t know much about Jeff Greene, you’re not alone.”

I tried to look this quote up on Google and didn’t find an article link. What I did find was Mr. Abramson’s Twitter page, which includes this live-tweet:

If you don’t know much about Jeff Greene, you’re not alone.

Here’s his site http://bit.ly/9ozBcj We’re about to learn more #flsen #pbdb8

This is an absolutely egregious misappropriation of a reporter’s tweet by the Meek communications office. They just cut the last part of his tweet off! Mr. Abramson, along with the other writers at the Palm Beach Post, was merely informing his Twitter followers about Jeff Greene’s candidacy. He was getting them up to speed in case they hadn’t been following the primary contest previously. It’s pretty clear that Abramson’s Tweet was not an indication that he thought Jeff Greene lost the debate and Kendrick Meek was the victor.

Abramson did contribute to a Michael Bender piece in the Palm Beach Post. That piece, like the others, was a balanced review of the debate. Bender does not declare a winner or loser in the debate.

This tactic was repeated with respect to the Beth Reinhard quote. It is actually a live Tweet from the debate. Her article with Adam Smith, as I discussed earlier, did not declare a winner. Again, this was a Tweet taken out of context; Reinhard tweeted about one exchange within the debate.

The News Service of Florida article also does not declare a winner of the debate.

The remaining quotes were taken from blogs and do not warrant further inquiry. It’s pretty clear here that Kendrick Meek’s staffers declared victory based on quotes taken out of context. This is a fairly ridiculous attempt to spin the results of the debate.  The credible political writers in this state all wrote of a contentious, nasty, yet engaging contest between two candidates. They carefully documented the blows Greene and Meek delivered to one another. Not one of them declared Meek the winner. That much is clear.

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Marco Rubio weighs in on Jeff Greene vs Kendrick Meek debate

Marco Rubio offered his two cents on the debate held this morning between Jeff Greene and Kendrick Meek:

“For Floridians who are satisfied with the direction of our country and the policies coming out of Washington, the first Democrat debate was music to their ears,” said Rubio. “On issue after issue, each candidate tried to assure voters that only he will be a stronger rubber stamp for the same costly, intrusive policies that are taking our country down the wrong path. I am running for U.S. Senate because now, more than ever, Florida needs a check-and-balance against Washington.”

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