Kendrick Meek Archives - Page 6 of 32 - SaintPetersBlog

Pre-debate from Jeff Greene campaign: Kendrick Meek led homeowners ‘over a cliff’

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Jeff Greene’s campaign spokesman Luis Vizcaino responds to the Kendrick Meek campaign memo this morning:

“Kendrick Meek led the people of Florida over a cliff when he sponsored homeownership fairs entitled Ten Weeks to Homeownership that targeted first-time home buyers essentially persuading people to take-on risky loans that they could not afford. And now, in a desperate attempt to save his failing campaign, Meek tries to place blame elsewhere for the thousands of people that lost their homes, when he should be looking in the mirror.

“Not only did he host these homeownership fairs, Meek received $70,000 in campaign contributions from lending organizations tied to the housing crisis including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The fact is that Kendrick Meek hosted homeownership fairs that included subprime lenders Countrywide Financial, New Century Financial and Household International, which were among the biggest issuers and abusers of sup-prime mortgage loans.”

“It shouldnt be a surprise that Kendrick Meek received $70,000 in contributions from companies and organizations tied to the subprime lending crisis including Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. When you’re in the pocket of special interests, as Kendrick Meek is, all you have to do is follow the money trail to find the motive.”

Kendrick Meek campaign anticipates ‘lies and misstatements’ from Jeff Greene during debate

Their debate isn’t for another 90 minutes, but U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek took the first shot with a preemptive memo outlining “Jeff Greene’s lies” during an editorial board meeting with The Palm Beach Post last week.

The debate between the two is scheduled to start at 10 a.m. It will be broadcast PalmBeachPost.com.

Read the entire press release here.

National Review: Why I am not worried about Marco Rubio yet

From National Review: Lots of readers are looking at new polls in Florida and getting worried about Marco Rubio. I’m not, yet. I’d like to see Rubio leading, obviously, but a couple of things are jumping out at me in recent polling.

1. Democrats are wavering between Crist and Meek. Until April, Kendrick Meek was above 20 percent in a three-way matchup; since then, the bottom has fallen out; in the last four, he’s hit 15, 17, 15, and 14 percent.

This is an astonishingly low level for a major-party candidate in a competitive state. By contrast, Katherine Harris’s disaster of a Senate campaign won 38 percent in a two-way race, in a year when the words “Florida Republican” made people think of Mark Foley.

With one exception, when Meek is ahead of 20 percent, Rubio leads; when Meek is in the teens, Crist leads.

I have a tough time believing that Meek will not A) win the Democratic primary against Jeff Greene and B) remain in the race until the end. Yes, Meek is barely ahead in the Democratic primary, and Greene is spending a bundle. If Greene manages to spend his way to the Democratic nomination, we’ll have to rethink this; if the Democrats, in a swing state, are represented by a real-estate billionaire who hangs with Heidi Fleiss and Mike Tyson, it is possible that the Democrat’s final percentage on Election Day will be in the neighborhood of Meek’s current puny total.

Presuming the race is Rubio vs. Crist vs. Meek, will most of Florida’s Democrats disagree with Pennsylvania’s Democrats, and vote for the guy who they were rooting against just four years ago? I think a decent number of “Crist Democrats” will come home to Meek.

2. Charlie Crist is likely to have serious cash-flow problems as the race heats up. He has built up money reserves for now, but Florida’s an expensive state to campaign in and Rubio has proven a shockingly successful fundraiserCrist is shut off from most of his national GOP donors. Right now, Charlie Crist dominates the news, because he’s just done something dramatic (leave his party) and every day he’s announcing some shocking about-face on issues, and ironically that’s helping him win the daily message fight.

3. Rally around the state flag: BP oil is starting to reach Florida, and Crist is doing gubernatorial things to protect his state. Instead of looking like a treacherous Oompa-loompa whose ravenous ambition devoured his principles long ago, he looks like the guy who’s trying to protect his state’s pretty wildlife and birds from the Blob.

This helps Crist at the moment, but we don’t know whether this halo effect will still be in place come November.

4. Nobody’s really attacked Crist yet: Remember the phrase, “7 definite flip-flops, 2 rhetorical shifts and 4 more where a switch seems inevitable.”

Beyond that, it’s July. If the numbers look like this in late September or October, we can start worrying.

UPDATE: A fifth point from a smart reader: “Sooner or later, he will have to declare whether he plans on voting for Harry Reid or Mitch McConnell as Majority Leader.  That will move things.  Along those lines, he’ll have to take stands on the issues which will either disappoint Democrats or move Republican-leaners toward Rubio.”

National Review: Why I am not worried about Marco Rubio yet

From National Review: Lots of readers are looking at new polls in Florida and getting worried about Marco Rubio. I’m not, yet. I’d like to see Rubio leading, obviously, but a couple of things are jumping out at me in recent polling.

1. Democrats are wavering between Crist and Meek. Until April, Kendrick Meek was above 20 percent in a three-way matchup; since then, the bottom has fallen out; in the last four, he’s hit 15, 17, 15, and 14 percent.

This is an astonishingly low level for a major-party candidate in a competitive state. By contrast, Katherine Harris’s disaster of a Senate campaign won 38 percent in a two-way race, in a year when the words “Florida Republican” made people think of Mark Foley.

With one exception, when Meek is ahead of 20 percent, Rubio leads; when Meek is in the teens, Crist leads.

I have a tough time believing that Meek will not A) win the Democratic primary against Jeff Greene and B) remain in the race until the end. Yes, Meek is barely ahead in the Democratic primary, and Greene is spending a bundle. If Greene manages to spend his way to the Democratic nomination, we’ll have to rethink this; if the Democrats, in a swing state, are represented by a real-estate billionaire who hangs with Heidi Fleiss and Mike Tyson, it is possible that the Democrat’s final percentage on Election Day will be in the neighborhood of Meek’s current puny total.

Presuming the race is Rubio vs. Crist vs. Meek, will most of Florida’sDemocrats disagree with Pennsylvania’s Democrats, and vote for the guy who they were rooting against just four years ago? I think a decent number of “Crist Democrats” will come home to Meek.

2. Charlie Crist is likely to have serious cash-flow problems as the race heats up. He has built up money reserves for now, but Florida’s an expensive state to campaign in and Rubio has proven a shockingly successful fundraiserCrist is shut off from most of his national GOP donors. Right now, Charlie Crist dominates the news, because he’s just done something dramatic (leave his party) and every day he’s announcing some shocking about-face on issues, and ironically that’s helping him win the daily message fight.

3. Rally around the state flag: BP oil is starting to reach Florida, and Crist is doing gubernatorial things to protect his state. Instead of looking like a treacherous Oompa-loompa whose ravenous ambition devoured his principles long ago, he looks like the guy who’s trying to protect his state’s pretty wildlife and birds from the Blob.

This helps Crist at the moment, but we don’t know whether this halo effect will still be in place come November.

4. Nobody’s really attacked Crist yet: Remember the phrase, “7 definite flip-flops, 2 rhetorical shifts and 4 more where a switch seems inevitable.”

Beyond that, it’s July. If the numbers look like this in late September or October, we can start worrying.

UPDATE: A fifth point from a smart reader: “Sooner or later, he will have to declare whether he plans on voting for Harry Reid or Mitch McConnell as Majority Leader.  That will move things.  Along those lines, he’ll have to take stands on the issues which will either disappoint Democrats or move Republican-leaners toward Rubio.”

Stop the presses! RedState posts something not-entirely-positive about Marco Rubio

For a moment there, I thought I was still on Daily Kos, but nope, there is actually a post on RedState that does not slurp Marco Rubio:

Don’t get me wrong: his campaign up to this point has been rather brilliant, taking an established politician and selling him not only to the Florida GOP but to national conservatives (grassroots and establishment alike) as the true, “outsider” principled conservative choice for Florida and the Tea Party. Which he is, I trust.

But something’s shifted. The awkward grammar of his ubiquitous web ads are spelling out something more and more starkly partisan. “Conservative,” “Principled,” “Ideas,” etc. now all easily translate into merely “Republican” with a capital “R.” While Crist gains in the polls and could even become a true front-runner in the next few weeks, Rubio’s campaign–and this might just be my news- and commentary-scavenging subconscious here–is appearing desperate, almost on the verge of all-out slander and begging (and being sidelined) as their national message/statewide primary victory is diluted as he’s no longer the obvious “it” candidate for the national grassroots and he’s no longer cleansing the party itself.

Perhaps that’s it, and his successful messaging was built into the fact that he was keeping the party principled. Or perhaps he’s just not appealing to the wider electorate (I doubt that–take a look at some recent Floridian senators and tell me Rubio doesn’t look like a breath of fresh air).

Or perhaps the Gulf oil spill is the new bailout, and Rubio just hasn’t been outspoken enough on it (while Crist is on the front lines).

But one thing that’s clear if he’s going to beat Charlie Crist and Kendrick Meek in November is that the messaging has to change. He’s got to make headlines again (at least around the blogosphere) with bold ideas, and not just sell himself as the guy with bold ideas.

Come on, Rubio, we know you’ve got it.

Why Charlie Crist now leads Florida Senate race

Florida’s Republican Governor Charlie Crist is now leading in polls against Republican Marco Rubio for the 2010 Florida Senate race, where Crist will run as an independent. Crist’s break with his party was seen as a sign that the GOP’s hard-line conservatives were growing in power over the moderate wing of the party. A recent poll by the Florida Chamber of Commerce shows Crist with 42 percent support, giving Rubio 31 percent and Democratic candidate Kendrick Meek 14 percent. After months of Rubio leading Crist, often by double digits, the new poll is the latest showing a Crist resurgence. How did he do it and what does it mean for the Florida and for national races?

  • Economy No Longer at Forefront The Florida Chamber of Commerce’s Marian Johnson reports, “Interestingly, our poll also shows immigration and property taxes to be in the top three issues concerning Floridians for the first time in several years. … Though the economy and job creation will certainly be weighing heavily on voters’ minds going into the 2010 election cycle, education and the oil spill in the Gulf are now two of the most important issues to voters and will become increasingly important on a statewide level.”
  • Dems Giving Up on Meek Liberal blogger Taniel writes, “Sure, these numbers could evolve once [Democratic candidate Kendrick] Meek starts increasing his name recognition but with all the noise about Democratic officials starting to move towards Crist, the congressman’s increasingly low numbers have to be worrisome.”
  • Crist Gaining Black Vote, Labor Unions The National Review’s Neal Freeman writes, “Crist began, typically, with a few brazen sorties into the black community. Back in 2006, he won 18 percent of the black vote, and he predicts that he will do even better this time. … Meek will win the black vote, of course, but he may not run up the fat margins he would need to win statewide. With organized labor, Crist is doing better still. Meek won the endorsement of the AFL-CIO, but the single most important labor player in the state, the Florida Education Association, has just issued a ‘dual endorsement’ of Crist and Meek. FEA endorsements of Democratic candidates are semi-automatic, and the FEA hedge is thus counted as a big win for Crist.”
  • Crist Hews Ideology to Electoral Prospects HotLine’s Jamie Shufflebarger documents, “Crist’s opinions have largely traced his electoral path. He was more of a libertarian centrist in ’98, but a tough FL GOV primary against CFO Tom Gallagher (R) in ’06 led him to take more socially conservative positions as the campaign progressed. When Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) considered him for his VP short list in ’08, Crist’s positions changed to toe the GOP platform, and then edged further to the right during the early days of the ’10 FL SEN primary against ex-state House Speaker Marco Rubio (R). After he left the GOP in late Apr., observers have marveled at the speed of his shifts to the left.”
  • ‘The Oil Spill Saved Crist’ The Daily Beast’s Samuel Jacobs writes, “Once left for dead in his Senate campaign against Marco Rubio, Florida governor Charlie Crist has used the BP spill to show leadership and rise in the polls. … The Gulf oil leak has yet to reach Florida’s shores in a major way, but it has already caused a sea change in the Sunshine State’s most prominent campaign. While Crist appears cool, composed, and in control–calling for tougher legislation to shut down offshore drilling–GOP wunderkind Rubio seems out of step with Florida’s populace, supporting a policy of continued offshore drilling that polling shows voters reject.”

Florida pollster Tom Eldon puts Jeff Greene a 3-to-2 favorite over Kendrick Meek

Those are the odds from Florida pollster Tom Eldon on the Democratic U.S. Senate primary between Palm Beach real estate tycoon Jeff Greene and U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek of Miami. Eldon helped us handicap the race in preparation for tomorrow’s debate at The Palm Beach Post’s world headquarters in West Palm Beach.

Eldon gives Greene the edge based on money. Greene, along with Republican gubernatorial candidate Rick Scott, has the rare combination in Florida politics of “outsider” status and deep pockets. Continue reading here.

National Review: Kendrick Meek’s Changing Fortunes

National Review: Unlike his neighbors along the mean streets of inner-city Miami, Kendrick Meek was born sucking on a silver spoon, at least politically speaking. He was the son of the legendary Carrie Meek, who built a political career from the ground up, picking her way from door to door across the cracked-window desolation of Liberty City. She became the first African American to win a place in the Florida congressional delegation and, after years of nit-pick constituent service to the majority blacks and minority Haitians in her impoverished district, she managed to lock down the 17th CD for life. And then for a bit longer, as it happened. In July 2002, just days before the filing deadline, Representative Meek unexpectedly retired. The only candidate prepared to jump into the race at that late date was her son, Kendrick, at the time a highway patrolman and part-time state legislator. The campaign was no pick-and-shovel chore for young Meek. He ran unopposed in the Democratic primary, and then unopposed in the general election. Just as he did in the subsequent elections of 2004, 2006, and 2008. Life, at least in its political dimension, has been more than fair to Kendrick Meek. Continue reading here.

National Review: Kendrick Meek’s Changing Fortunes

National Review: Unlike his neighbors along the mean streets of inner-city Miami, Kendrick Meek was born sucking on a silver spoon, at least politically speaking. He was the son of the legendary Carrie Meek, who built a political career from the ground up, picking her way from door to door across the cracked-window desolation of Liberty City. She became the first African American to win a place in the Florida congressional delegation and, after years of nit-pick constituent service to the majority blacks and minority Haitians in her impoverished district, she managed to lock down the 17th CD for life. And then for a bit longer, as it happened. In July 2002, just days before the filing deadline, Representative Meek unexpectedly retired. The only candidate prepared to jump into the race at that late date was her son, Kendrick, at the time a highway patrolman and part-time state legislator. The campaign was no pick-and-shovel chore for young Meek. He ran unopposed in the Democratic primary, and then unopposed in the general election. Just as he did in the subsequent elections of 2004, 2006, and 2008. Life, at least in its political dimension, has been more than fair to Kendrick Meek. Continue reading here.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons