Marco Rubio makes final swing through Florida ahead of primary

Marco Rubio looked to define his opponent Monday, telling Southwest Florida voters there will be a clear contrast come Election Day.

“The Democrats will have a primary tomorrow, and we’ll see who their choice is,” said Rubio during a stop at the Cape Coral Military Museum. “I can tell you who the Democratic choice is … it’s a congressman from Palm Beach named Patrick Murphy. If he is their nominee, I look forward to the choice voters have.”

Rubio made no mention of his own primary challenge during his remarks Monday morning. Instead he used the speech as a chance to highlight the differences between himself and Murphy, and encourage voters to get to the polls come November.

Rubio faces Carlos Beruff, a Manatee County homebuilder, in Tuesday’s Republican primary. He is largely expected to win the primary, and recent polls show Rubio leads Beruff by double digits.

“We’re very confident. Obviously we worked very hard and we feel good about tomorrow, and we’ll see what voters decide,” he told reporters. “But no matter what, we got to win in November — and that’s true across the ballot, so I thought today was a good day to kind of focus on November and what’s at stake.”

And what’s at stake, Rubio told the crowd, is the future of the country. The Miami Republican said Murphy has a “sense of entitlement.”

“The U.S. Senate seat doesn’t belong to the people who want to buy it, it belongs to the people of the state,” said Rubio. “I’m running for re-election, and I have to earn the right to continue to represent you. And that’s what I intend to do.”

The stop in Southwest Florida was the first of four campaign stops Monday. He was also scheduled to attend events in Bay County and Pensacola, before ending his day in Miami. He was joined by Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera, who ended his own U.S. Senate bid when Rubio jumped into the race.

Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto, a Fort Myers Republican and a member of Rubio’s Southwest Florida grassroots leadership team, introduced Rubio, saying she was supporting him because “of who he is and where he came from.”

“He’ll tell you the story … about his father who is the bartender and his mother who was a maid. It really is that simple — when you come from nothing you know what it is to push, to work, to ask people to believe in you to achieve your own maximum potential,” she said. “He thinks of the least among us, to make sure … those that want to realize the American dream can do it here in an environment that wants them to be successful.”

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Tom Jackson: Maybe if we thought of primaries as playoffs …

The impression I get is people have the wrong idea about primary elections. To apply a sports analogy, people — I’d call them voters, except they’re plainly not — think of primaries as the exhibition season.

This is not without solid foundation. I mean, they do sort of look like the preseason. Starry-eyed unknowns hoping to take down the veteran; once-storied hotshots looking for one last hurrah. (I’m looking at you, Jim Norman.)

And the way we treat it, it’s like the Grapefruit League and NFL preseason rolled into one: fun to talk about, but if we miss it, meh, there’s always the Big One in November.

Even the name we give it sounds lightweight: the primaries, suggesting nothing more than a scrimmage among unknowns. It’s the I’ll-get-around-to-it-unless-something-else-comes-up election, and given the usual turnouts, something usually does.

Hillsborough County’s elections Supervisor Craig Latimer is pretty fired up that about 104,000 ballots have been cast by mail (76,687) and at early voting precincts (27,667). But even if that number doubles come Tuesday’s Election Day — a stretch, with storms anticipated — it’ll mean only slightly more than a quarter of the county’s eligible voters will have bothered.

In the greater Tampa Bay area, early and mail turnout has been slightly better in Pinellas (19.5 percent) and Manatee (16.6 percent), but it’s worse in Pasco (11 percent) and Polk (9.9 percent).

At least those elections supervisors are reporting numbers. With a website that gives every sign of not having been updated in a month and is otherwise practically indecipherable, how Sarasota County is doing is anybody’s guess.

Moreover, given the number of studies that suggest early and mail balloting do not expand voter participation, but merely front-load it with those who’d otherwise show up on Election Day, it’s fair to predict — for all the hype about how this year is changing the very nature of elections — that nothing, really, is different.

Maybe we’re distracted by the approach of Labor Day. Or settling back into the school routine.

Maybe it’s the candidates, although the race for U.S. Senate scarcely lacks for intrigue, Republicans presenting “Liddle” Marco Rubio versus Carlos “Mini-Donald” Beruff and Democrats countering with Patrick “Never Mind My Resume” Murphy and Alan “I’ll Say Anything” Grayson.

Who wouldn’t want to help decide those? Answer: Close to 75 percent of us. Did I mention Labor Day?

Or maybe it’s a marketing problem.

Maybe if we called this first round something packing a little more brinksmanship, it would better stir the public’s passions. Like, say, “the semifinals.” Or, borrowing from professional sports, which have their conference or league championships, suppose we called them the “Party Championships,” and capitalized them.

Gives you a tingle, right? Makes you feel something important is at stake? Sort of makes you want to throw down? Heck, yeah.

In fact, in most cases, the party championship — excuse me, the Party Championship — is precisely what we’re deciding. What self-respecting major-party member couldn’t get charged up about that?

Add contests for circuit and county judges and the interesting, to say the least, primary election placement of a state constitutional amendment regarding the tax treatment of solar arrays on homesteaded property, and, folks, we don’t just have a major-party playoff happening Tuesday.

We have a playoff with the equivalent of a pregame tailgate party.

And if all that is insufficient motivation, remember this: If you skip out, you’re ceding influence to people who will vote.

Like me.

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Joe Henderson: Some pre-primary thoughts for Hillsborough County

I will be paying attention to a lot of things during Tuesday’s primary election. The weather, however, will not be high on the list.

Even with storms in Tuesday’s forecast, it may not affect the turnout that much.

As of Sunday, voters cast nearly 104,000 ballots in Hillsborough County for the primary election, either by mail or at early voting events like Sunday’s “Souls to The Polls” gathering at two Tampa locations.

As of late afternoon, there were 3,267 votes cast at either the C. Blythe Andrews, Jr. Public Library or the West Tampa Branch Library.

“That’s a tremendous turnout,” Hillsborough elections supervisor Craig Latimer said. “I’ve said that Election Day is the last day to vote, not the first.”

Latimer is a relentless champion of early voting, especially by mail. People have been listening. At last count, more than 76,000 ballots had been returned by mail. That could make a huge difference in a primary when bad weather is predicted.

“We’ve been talking about this (weather possibility) for a week now,” Latimer said. “Regardless of the weather, though, a lot of people have already voted.”

MARCO NEEDS A BIG WIN

People will be closely watching what Marco Rubio does in his Republican Senate primary race against upstart (and Rick Scott favorite) Carlos Beruff.

Rubio will win, of course – few people doubt that. He needs a landslide, though. A Mason-Dixon Polling & Research survey last week showed Rubio with 61 percent to 22 for Beruff.

That indicates an easy win and Rubio needs that. Anything less could be viewed as a caution flag about his electability in November. Rubio hasn’t been hitting the trail much in these final days, indicating he is comfortable with his position now.

KEEPING IT LOCAL

Veteran Hillsborough County pol Jim Norman, whose promising career in the Florida Senate was sidetracked over questions about a land transaction involving his wife, is in a fight for his political life.

He is hoping to return to the county commission, where he served 18 years before being elected to the Senate in 2010. His Republican primary opponent, Tim Schock, won the endorsement of the Tampa Bay Times, which declared, “This one is an easy call.”

Another political future hanging in the balance is that of outgoing Hillsborough Commissioner Kevin Beckner, who has gone all-in to defeat Democratic icon Pat Frank in their primary for the county clerk of courts office.

Beckner won praise for his work in two terms on the county commission, but has raised eyebrows by going negative on the venerable Frank – including bringing her age (she is 86) into the game. Should Beckner lose, he may have a lot of making up to do with Hillsborough Democrats.

Lastly, keep an eye on Hillsborough school board races involving incumbents Cindy Stuart and Susan Valdes. They were two of the so-called “Gang of Four” (a really unfair moniker) that voted to oust Superintendent MaryEllen Elia in January 2015.

Those opposed to the move vowed, including Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn, vowed revenge at the ballot box.

Here’s their chance.

FINALLY …

This admission from Ed Narain, Democratic candidate for Senate District 19.

Narain was making the rounds Sunday at a “Souls To The Polls” event in east Tampa. It’s worth remembering that in 2012, Republicans tried to limit these traditional events that remain popular in the African-American community.

“We should be trying to make voting easier,” Narain said. “Early voting makes sense, especially in the digital age. I love to vote by mail, but these days I still need to bring my ballot to the polls on Election Day.”

Can’t miss those last-chance opportunities to meet with the voters.

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Marco Rubio schedules four city campaign swing ahead of primary

Marco Rubio is making a final push to the primary.

Rubio will meet with activists and volunteers to rally support ahead of Tuesday’s primary.

“I look forward to meeting with supporters throughout the state of Florida on Monday,” said Rubio in a statement. “The final days leading up to the primary are the most crucial and I am excited to talk to voters about why I am the clear choice to serve as Florida’s U.S. Senator.”

Rubio will kick off the four-city tour at 9 a.m. at the Cape Coral Military Museum in Cape Coral.

From there, he’ll head to Bay County where he’ll hold an event at 12:30 CST at Robert’s Hall in Lynn Haven. He’s then scheduled to hold an event at 3 p.m. CST at Seville Quarter in Pensacola.

Rubio will round out the day with an event in Miami at 8:45 p.m.

The Miami Republican faces Carlos Beruff, a Manatee County homebuilder, in Tuesday’s primary. He is widely believed to win the primary, with recent polls showing him with a double-digit lead over Beruff.

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Florida Chamber poll: Marco Rubio, Patrick Murphy walloping opponents

Marco Rubio and Patrick Murphy are poised to win their party’s nomination come Tuesday, but a new poll from the Florida Chamber Political Institute found Florida voters don’t know or don’t like many of the candidates on the ballot.

The statewide poll shows Rubio leads Manatee County Republican Carlos Beruff by nearly 50 percentage points. The poll shows Rubio is at 68 percent, while Beruff is at 19 percent. Ten percent of respondents said they were still undecided.

On the Democratic side, Murphy is beating Rep. Alan Grayson by nearly 30 percentage points. The survey showed Murphy is at 40 percent to Grayson’s 11 percent. There are more undecided voters on the Democratic side, with 38 percent of respondents said they were still undecided.

Marian Johnson, the senior vice president of government and political relations at the Chamber, said it is unusual to see so many voters still undecided.

“A week sounds like a short time, but it can be a lifetime for a campaign and provide candidates the opportunity to make solid gains that can improve their outcome,” she said in a statement. “It’s unusual to see this many undecided voters this close to the election, but for candidates, it’s good news. They still have time to move the voters.”

They don’t have that much time. Nearly 1.2 million voters have already cast a ballot ahead of the Aug. 30 primary, according to the Florida Chamber of Commerce.

While Rubio and Murphy are poised to win their primaries, they both face some problems when it comes to how voters view them. The survey found 44 percent of voters polled said they had an unfavorable view of Rubio, while 41 percent said they had an unfavorable opinion of the Republican Party.

The survey didn’t include favorability ratings for Murphy, but 46 percent of respondents said they had an unfavorable view of the Democratic Party; while 56 percent said they had an unfavorable view of Hillary Clinton, the Democratic nominee.

The Florida Chamber also looked at how Donald Trump is faring in Florida, and found 52 percent of respondents said they had an unfavorable view of the Republican nominee. That could be problematic for down ticket races across the state.

“The data clearly shows that Donald Trump’s name recognition may impact Republican candidates down ballot — particularly in large metropolitan South Florida areas,” said Andrew Wiggins, the senior director of campaign and elections at the Florida Chamber. “And, digging deep into the numbers, Trump continues to trail Hillary Clinton in South Florida, trailing by 19 points in Miami-Dade and by 15 points in West Palm Beach.”

The survey also found Amendment 4, which deals with tax exemptions for businesses using solar, is poised to pass. The survey found 70 percent of respondents said they would vote for it; while 14 percent said they weren’t supporting it.

The Florida Chamber’s political poll was conducted from Aug. 17 until Aug. 22 by Cherry Communications. The Chamber surveyed 608 likely Florida voters, and has a margin of error of 4 percent.

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Marco Rubio calls for lawmakers to pass Zika funding bill

Marco Rubio said Congress should immediately pass a bill to help combat the spread of Zika when it returns to work next month.

“Our job is to make sure the funding is available to not only fight Zika, but to get a vaccine,” said Rubio during a stop in Fort Myers on Wednesday.

Rubio said House and Senate leaders should have called lawmakers back to Washington, D.C. to approve a Zika funding bill.

The Senate passed a bipartisan $1.1 billion funding package earlier this year, much higher than the version passed by the House. House budget negotiators came to an agreement that would set aside $1.1 billion, but came with strings attached. That bill was blocked by Senate Democrats, who accused Republicans of playing politics.

Rubio said he has supported every funding proposal that has come before the Senate, and was an early supporter of President Barack Obama’s $1.9 billion funding package. Rubio said he asked the president to use the $300 million diverted from other programs to help fight Zika.

The Miami Republican’s comments came as another case of locally acquired Zika was discovered in Florida. Gov. Rick Scott announced Wednesday that a locally acquired case had been discovered in Palm Beach County.

Scott called on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to send 5,000 antibody tests to Florida. So far, the CDC has sent less than 1,200 tests to the Sunshine State.

“It is disappointing that these requests have not been fulfilled. Florida now has 43 cases of locally acquired Zika and the Obama Administration must quickly fulfill our entire request so that we can continue to provide the resources our state needs to combat this virus,” said Scott in a statement.

There are 636 cases of Zika in Florida. That number includes 43 locally acquired cases and 70 infections involving pregnant women.

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Marco Rubio on Donald Trump: First a con man, now better than Hillary Clinton

A dangerous, erratic, con man with the worst spray tan ever. That’s how Sen. Marco Rubio described Donald Trump when they were both seeking the Republican presidential nomination.

Now that Trump is the nominee and Rubio is running for re-election, his tone is different. He’s no longer criticizing Trump, but he isn’t exactly gushing praise. Democrats are trying to make him look like a hypocrite for backing the man he previously said shouldn’t have access to nuclear weapon codes, and for jumping back into the Senate race after he said he wouldn’t.

“Sen. Rubio is actually the real con man here,” said U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy, who is challenging U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson for the Democratic nomination. “He said something to the effect of, ‘Ten thousand times, I’m telling you I’m not going to run for the Senate again.’ Well guess what? He’s running for the Senate again.”

But don’t ask Rubio to reconcile supporting Trump with his past criticism.

“We’ve gone through that a million times,” Rubio said at a campaign stop at a Tallahassee restaurant. “At this point we’re just going to continue to focus on my race and leave the past in the past.”

Last month in Panama City, Rubio said he is supporting Trump because he pledged early in the campaign to support the Republican nominee.

“There are only two people in the world that are going to be president of the United States in 2017,” Rubio said. “It will either be Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. And It can’t be Hillary Clinton.”

Leaving his remarks in the past isn’t something his opponents are willing to do. Republican developer Carlos Beruff often criticizes Rubio for not enthusiastically supporting Trump, and Murphy and Grayson are calling him out for his hypocrisy.

Grayson described the relationship between Trump and Rubio by quoting late New York Yankees manager Billy Martin, who once said of late team owner George Steinbrenner and star outfielder Reggie Jackson: “The two of them deserve each other. One’s a born liar and the other’s convicted.” (Steinbrenner had pleaded guilty to making illegal contributions to President Richard Nixon‘s campaign.)

“That’s sort of how I feel about watching the love/hate fest between Marco Rubio and Donald Trump,” Grayson said.

Beruff, who has spent $8 million of his own money in the Republican primary, has repeatedly criticized Rubio for not doing more to support Trump.

“There are some people who don’t like the tepid response that Rubio has shown to Trump,” Beruff said. “There’s a loyalty there.”

Beruff’s effort doesn’t appear to be working: He’s far behind Rubio in the polls just a week away from the Aug. 30 primary.

Republicans say it’s a matter of forgiving and forgetting, despite Rubio making fun of Trump’s small hands, suggesting the billionaire wet his pants during a debate and mocking his Twitter misspellings at a campaign rally.

Wearing a “Make America Great Again” baseball cap to show support for Trump, Republican Bob Bezick, 64, of Madison said after attending Rubio’s Tallahassee event that he didn’t appreciate the back and forth between Rubio and Trump. But it won’t stop him from backing Rubio.

“It’s policies more than any of the chatter. All that stuff is just noise,” Bezick said.

And despite the not-so-cozy relationship between Rubio and Trump, Republicans say they won’t vote for Murphy or Grayson.

“That would be an extreme example of cutting off your nose to spite your face,” said Orange County Republican Party Chairman Lew Oliver.

If anything, Oliver said, keeping his distance from Trump could help Rubio with independent voters or Democrats dissatisfied with their party’s nominee.

“Tactically, that’s not a bad maneuver from his perspective because he’s probably going to get the Republican votes regardless,” Oliver said.

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

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Patrick Murphy campaign raised $1 million last month, has $4 million in bank

Today, U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy announced raising $1 million in the pre-primary FEC reporting period with $4 million cash-on-hand for his U.S. Senate campaign.

That’s in addition to the $800,000 his campaign already has pre-paid for TV commercials this fall.

“I continue to be humbled by the Floridians across our state who are standing with me in this election,” Murphy stated in a news release issued by his campaign. “It’s clear that hardworking Florida families are ready for a senator who shows up and works hard for them. Together, we will fight to strengthen the middle class, protect a woman’s right to choose, and defend Social Security and Medicare for our seniors. This election is about Florida families and I am so proud to have so many supporting our campaign.”

The latest federal filings show him with $3,994,000 in the bank. That’s far better than his Aug. 30 Democratic U.S. Senate primary opponents. The Federal Election Commission has not yet posted Aug. 10 numbers for U.S. Rep. Alan Grayson of Orlando. At the end of June he had $484,000. Miami lawyer Pam Keith had about $8,600 in the bank for the Aug. 10 report.

Keith and Murphy are celebrating some high-level endorsements this weekend. The Orlando Sentinel endorsed Murphy, rather than hometown candidate Grayson. The Miami Herald endorsed Keith.

Both papers, as have most others, endorsed incumbent U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio in the Republican primary. Rubio reported having $4.6 million cash-on-hand on Aug. 10. The FEC also has not yet posted the latest numbers for Rubio’s Aug. 30 Republican U.S. Senate primary opponent Carlos Beruff. At the end of June, Beruff had $125,000 left. If Rubio and Murphy win their parties’ nominations, they’ll go forward from here about even in money.

“Our campaign continues to build momentum as we raise the resources we will need to defeat Marco Rubio,” said Murphy campaign manager Josh Wolf. “Patrick’s message is resonating strongly with Florida voters, and our campaign is well positioned to take on Marco Rubio in November.”

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Patrick Murphy campaign gets million-dollar boost, as father cuts check to Senate super PAC

Democratic Congressman Patrick Murphy received another financial bump to his U.S. Senate campaign this week in the form of a million-dollar check from his father to a Senate super PAC.

The Hill reports Florida homebuilder Thomas Murphy gave $1 million to the Senate Majority PAC, the largest donation the Harry Reid-linked committee received in July.

The elder Murphy had also made a six-figure super PAC contribution supporting his son’s successful 2012 congressional campaign.

Two days after the July donation, Senate Majority PAC announced it will launch a one-million-dollar ad buy in Florida. Patrick Murphy, 33, faces liberal firebrand Alan Grayson, who has been openly opposed by Democratic leadership, in the Aug. 30 primary.

The Washington Post notes the ad buy was unusually early for the top Democratic Senate Super-PAC to intervene, calling it the “first-ever television ads in a Democratic primary, as it seeks to shepherd a top recruit through a competitive intraparty contest.”

 Murphy is in a tight race with incumbent Marco Rubio, who is leading by about 6 percent in recent polling.

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Marco Rubio declares support for NASA plan, calls on presidential nominees to do same

Saying NASA needs long-range political assurances, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio declared broad backing for the space agency’s agenda Friday and called on Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to do the same.

Rubio met Friday with space industry representatives and others in a round-table discussion organized by the Economic Development Commission of Florida’s Space Coast and Space Florida, the state’s space industry development corporation.

They heard from him what they wanted: that Florida’s junior senator, seeking re-election, is behind NASA’s most ambitious programs, to turn over as much lower-Earth orbit activity as possible to private companies and focus the nation’s manned space flight efforts on getting to Mars.

And Rubio said the best thing that can happen is the presidential nominees, Democrat Clinton and Republican Trump, announce they share those goals too. Neither major party candidate has outlined any space policies, though both the Republican and Democratic national committees have released very general statements of support of where NASA has been heading lately under President Barack Obama.

“My hope is that both candidates quite frankly will come forward with clear visions of NASA and future space exploration so that we have a strong level of certainty moving forward,” Rubio said.

Rubio’s meeting with the EDC and Space Florida representatives was closed to the media and the public, but he and Space Florida lobbyist Dale Ketcham met afterward with media, outlining Rubio’s positions and the space industry’s reactions. Among the attendees were representatives from Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrup Grumman, SpaceX, United Launch Alliance and Craig Technologies.

Rubio’s likely Democratic opponent this fall, U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy of Jupiter, met with a similar roundtable group earlier this year. Murphy also pledged broad support, though he offered some uncertainty and discomfort for some details of NASA’s agenda, particularly turning over manned-space-flight activity in lower Earth orbit entirely to the private sector.

Most urgently, Rubio called for long-term budgeting and administration vision that would provide long-term confidence for the space program.

“Not just keep what we have. Let’s not walk away from the progress we’ve already made,” Rubio said.

Rubio was critical of Obama for doing just that in his first term, before Rubio entered the Senate, when the president canceled the last big NASA deep space program, Constellation, at the same time the space shuttle program was ending.

The double whammy not only bled nearly 10,000 jobs from the Cape Canaveral area, but it also left uncertainty about what NASA would do next until the administration backed plans for the new, big, heavy-lift SLS rocket and a 20-year journey toward a manned Mars mission.

“For a lot of people there really was no, for a number of years, strategic guidance about why they were here to begin with,” Rubio said  “We’re concerned about that. Because this workforce is highly-specialized. If we stop providing certainty in both contracting and direction, this workforce tends to bleed off into other industries or other parts of the country or even other parts of the world. And it takes years to reconstitute that.”

But Rubio offered support for the administration’s eventual vision for NASA, with satellites probing the solar system, telescopes probing the deep cosmos, the International Space Station focusing on research, private companies such as SpaceX, Boeing and Lockheed Martin taking care of lower-Earth orbit activity, Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral becoming a multi-customer spaceport, and NASA focusing  on a mid-2030s manned flight to Mars.

Ketcham said the EDC and Space Florida representatives took the opportunity to encourage Rubio’s support for the Cape Canaveral Space Port as the nation’s premier launching site, something Rubio agreed with. Ketcham noted that much of Florida has research and business dependent on the spaceport.

“The Cape Canaveral Space Port region is bigger than Brevard County,” he said.

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