Rays Archives - Page 6 of 43 - SaintPetersBlog

Rays ready to try it again as baseball’s second half gets under way

You know how some teams hate to see the season stop because things are going so well. This pitcher is hot; that hitter is on a streak?
Well, this isn’t like that.

You know how some teams can’t wait for the season’s second half of the season to start so they can take up where they left off? So they pack the house with fans eager to see their energy and their passion.

This isn’t like that, either.

Instead, the Tampa Bay Rays will try to cut into the 20-game lead that the Baltimore Orioles have established in the AL East. It is a deficit that has happened with frightening speed. The Rays were only 5 ½ games back on June 15 before losing 22 of 25 games.

— It is a Rays team that has struggled. For instance, catcher Curt Casali is hitting only .166 … but it was the other catcher, Hank Conger, who was sent down (he was hitting .194).

— Could the Rays have two 20-game losers? Pitcher Chris Archer is 4-12. Teammate Drew Smyly is 2-10.

— Center fielder Kevin Kiermaier will be welcomed back this year, even though he’s hitting only .236. Kiermaier has played in only 38 games. The Rays were 20-20 when Kiermaier was hurt.

— Right-handed pitchers have been winless for the Rays for a month. Matt Moore has two wins and Blake Snell one in the team’s recent slump.

— The team’s record is its worst since 2005 (28-61, .315)

— The Rays’ starting pitchers have an ERA of 5.99 during the slump. The bullpen has an ERA of 7.84.

— The hitters have a league-worst average of .239, league worst slugging percentage of .389 and a major league-worst on-base percentage of .286.

— The Rays welcome relief pitcher Kevin Jepson back after Minnesota released Jepson.

Archer starts for the Rays against Yovani Gallardo.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

It’s no surprise that the Tampa Bay Rays are struggling at the All-Star break

The major league All-Star game will proceed without the Tampa Bay Rays.

Without any arguments for their players, either.

Oh, relief pitcher Alex Colome made it to the game with 19 saves this season. And Evan Longoria, hitting .289 with 19 homers, was eliminated in the voting for the final slot. Hey, you could even get a debate going in the name of second-baseman Logan Forsythe, who is hitting .285.

But, really, after that, all arguments are closed.  No one is even close to being an all-star. Which shows you that it wasn’t much of a surprise that the Rays finished on a 3-22 swoon. The Rays are bad, well, because they deserve to be bad.

Start with the pitching, where Chris Archer is 4-12 and Drew Smyly is 2-10 and Blake Snell is 1-4. By those standards, Matt Moore (5-6) and Jake Odorizzi (3-5) don’t look that bad.

Then there is the team’s catching, where Hank Conger has an average of .194 and Curt Casali has an average of .169.

How about the infield? Logan Morrison has been better lately, but he’s still at .236. Brad Miller has shown some pop, but he’s at .241. Backup shortstop Tim Beckham is at .170.

The outfield isn’t much better. Desmond Jennings is at .202 and Steven Souza is at .251 and is tied for eighth with 92 strikeouts. Kevin Kiermaier has played in only 38 games because of injury, but he’s hitting .236. Reserve Jaff Dacker is hitting .138 and Taylor Motter .188.

Also, the Rays don’t particularly play good defense, they don’t particularly run bases well and they aren’t particularly athletic.

In other words, the Rays slide (from 31-32) isn’t a surprise. It will be a surprise if the Rays manage to right themselves in the second half.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Rays close out first half with another loss, this time to former teammate David Price

It seems as if the Rays have been losing forever. They have not.

It was a less than a month ago that Tampa Bay was 31-32 and thinking about the race in the AL East. That was before 22 losses in their last 25 games sent them plunging through the division standings and solidly into last place, 20 games below .500 and searching for direction.

The Rays lost another one Sunday in their last game before the major league all-star break. Former teammate David Price shut them down with eight innings of four-hit shutout baseball, and the team lost 4-0.

“It’s sickening to think how far we’ve fallen off here,” said manager Kevin Cash. “If anything, it tells you we’re capable of being a lot better than what we are. We’ve got to show better than what we’re doing.”

Jake Odorizzi gave up three runs in the first, and the Rays never threatened. Price had 10 strikeouts against his old club. The Rays’ bullpen, however, had a successful game in the loss.

The Rays have lost six in a row and 10 of their last 11. Going into Sunday’s game, the pitching staff had a 6.04 ERA and the bullpen had an 8.18 ERA. The team has been outscored 152-78. And defensively, Tampa Bay has committed 19 errors, highest in the league.

The Rays return to action Friday with Chris Archer on the mound.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Rays nearing the bottom as their worst-ever losing streak continues

From here, you can see the bottom.

The freefall of the Tampa Bay Rays continued Saturday afternoon with a 4-1 loss to the Boston Red Sox. It was the team’s 21st loss in their last 24 games, and it brought the Rays to within 3 ½ games of the Minnesota Twins, who are last in the American League

The Rays, like most of the month, didn’t have enough going on Saturday. Matt Moore started and gave up two earned runs and two unearned. They didn’t have enough defense (Steven Souza misplayed a fly ball in center). They didn’t have enough hitting (seven hits).

“We’ve been inconsistent on defense,” said Rays’ manager Kevin Cash. “Those defensive miscues, when you’re in a down funk like this, show up. Any mstake we make, it’s allowing a run or two to get over.”

Evan Longoria and Logan Morrison had two hits each for the Rays.

It led to the team’s fifth straight loss and their 10th in 11 games.

Rick Porcello picked up his 11th win for Boston. Xander Boegarts hit a two-run homer.

The Rays finish the first part of their schedule today when Jake Odorizzi pitches against David Price.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Rays need more shutdown innings in their last loss to the Boston Red Sox

If there is anything that the worst streak in the history of the Tampa Bay Rays franchise has shown us, it’s that they know how to fall behind.

Take Friday night’s loss (what else?) to the Boston Red Sox. The Rays fell behind in the first inning. They caught up. They fell behind again. They caught up again. They fell behind again. Why? Because that’s what losing teams do.

The Rays lost their 20th game in 23 outings Friday night, falling 6-5 to the Red Sox. That is the worst the Rays have been in the history of the franchise in 23 games.

It was the 12th loss in 16 decisions for Chris Archer, who went six innings and gave up five runs and seven hits. For the team, it dropped the Rays to eight games back…of fourth place in the AL East. Overall, they are 15 1/2 games behind.

“You want to go out there and have shutdown innings after we score,” said Archer. “It’s very tough. I’m typically better than that.”

Rays’ manager Kevin Cash agreed: “We have to find a way to get those shutdown innings. We’re very frustrated.”

It didn’t help that Archer threw first-pitch strikes to only 10 of 26 batters, or that, once again, he struggled in the first inning. For the year, Archer’s ERA is 4.66.

For the Rays, third baseman Evan Longoria, who was voted out of the All-Star game earlier in the day, went four-for-five with two RBI and a home run. Corey Dickerson and Nick Franklin also had two hits.

For Boston, David Ortiz hit a home run.

Today, the Rays’ Matt Moore faces Boston’s Rick Porcello in the team’s next-to-last game before the all-star break.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

No All-Star game for Rays’ third baseman Evan Longoria, fifth in voting

In the end, Evan Longoria got a pretty nice t-shirt.

He did not, however, get the final spot on the AL all-star team.

Longoria finished fifth of five players competing for the final spot on the AL roster. Toronto’s Michael Sanders won the spot with 17.7 million votes.

Following Saunders were George Springer, Dustin Pedroia and Ian Kinsler.

In the National League, Brandon Belt of the Giants got the slot. He was followed by Sterling Marte of the Pirates, Trevor Story of the Rockies, Jake Lamb of the Diamondbacks and Ryan Braun of the Brewers.

The Rays’ only all-star representative will be reliever Alex Colome.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Punchless offense leads Rays to yet another defeat against Los Angeles Angels

The longer the Tampa Bay Rays hang around, the more likely it is that something bad is going to happen to them.

Take Thursday afternoon, for instance. Rookie Blake Snell threw five shutout innings and allowed only three hits, the same as the Los Angeles Angels’ Hector Santiago. But over the final four innings, the Angels pulled out a 5-1 victory with the last three runs coming off the bullpen.

The Rays struck out 13 times and had only five hits.

Snell fell to 1-4 on the season.

“For his sake, that might have been one of his best outings,” Rays’ manager Kevin Cash said. “I really think we’re all pleased with the way Blake made a commitment with commanding the ball, commanding the fastball. He had a good changeup going that he was throwing for strikes. I think Jim Hickey even referenced that after three innings, he had led off every batter with a strike, and that’s the kind of intent that we’re looking for out of him, because we know if he gets ahead in his counts, his stuff will work just fine up here.”

Tampa Bay, now next-to-last in the American League, now trails the Orioles by 15 ½ games. They are playing .400 baseball.

The Rays scored only when Brad Miller homered in the eighth.

“I think we’ve been very honest and up front: We are frustrated,” Cash said. “We aren’t pleased with the way things are going, and the only way you get out of that is to start winning some ballgames. We’re going to Boston now. We’ve got three big games up there before the break, and we play well, some really competitive baseball against the Red Sox, and it should be a good challenge for us to get going before the break.”

Former Tampa Bay player Yunel Escobar had three hits for the Angels.

The Rays now visit the Red Sox. Chris Archer pitches tonight.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Angels drub Tampa Bay Rays after Steven Souza benched for not hustling

It was a big enough gaffe for Tampa Bay’s Steven Souza to be pulled from the game.

It was not big enough, evidently, for manager Kevin Cash to talk about after a 13-3 loss to the Los Angeles Angels.

Cash pulled Souza from the game in the fourth inning, just after Souza had tripled and scored. Souza had been slow to get out of the batter’s box.

“You know what, there are issues that happen in a team that we address in-house,” Cash said. “We’ll keep in-house and we’ll move on from there.”

Cash said “no message” was being sent.

“I think the bottom line is that I play hard but right there I didn’t play very hard,” Souza said. “I got caught slipping and took for granted a routine play. I got to third, but I could have easily scored if I was running hard. It’s a bit embarrassing, it’s not how this team runs. It’s not how we want our identity to be and I’m not proud of it. If you go watch the video, I’m not even at first base yet and that’s not in my DNA. That’s not how I want to play this game.”

It was just one more negative in a 20-game slide that has left the Rays firmly entrenched in fifth place. The Rays have only won three games of those 20. It was the third time in the last six games the Rays have given up double-digit runs. The pitching staff has a 6.35 ERA (173-IP, 122-ER) over this 3-17 stretch, compared to a 4.03 ERA before it. The bullpen has a 9.26 ERA (57.1-IP, 59-ER), compared to a 3.63 ERA before it.

“The issue of the night was getting the lead and not being able to find that shut-down inning,” Cash said. “As far as (Odorizzi0, he looked really crisp in the 1st inning.”

Pitcher Jake Odorizzi gave up nine hits and seven runs in 5 1/3 innings. The bullpen gave up six more in the ninth inning.

“It’s just frustrating,” Odorizzi said. “I’m not throwing how I’m capable of doing. We had the lead and gave it right back. That’s on me. I’m accountable for it. Nobody is more frustrated than me with my performances this entire season. I’m just going to work in between starts and get back to where I should be.

“It starts with starting pitching. We just need consistent performances. Matt did a great job yesterday, I did a bad job today. It all starts with us. …It falls on us to go set the tone. Our offense has been doing pretty good scoring runs for us and we just haven’t done a good job of holding it.”

The Angels got two home runs from C.J. Cron.

Today, Drew Smyly throws against Jered Weaver.

 

 

 

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Has Tampa Bay’s Matt Moore made himself too valuable to trade away?

For a while, Matt Moore was pitching well enough for another team to be interested in him.

These days, Moore is pitching well enough to stay.

Despite trade rumors, Moore pitched well again Monday, allowing the Tampa Bay Rays to win 4-2 over the Los Angeles Angels, 4-2. It was the sixth straight game Moore had pitched six innings or more. It evened his record at 5-5 and was the first time he has won back to back games (with no no-decisions in between) since 2013.

Moore has allowed three runs or fewer in 12 of his last 14 starts.

“I think in the earlier innings I was searching for a little bit of command there, in general, with all my pitches,” Moore said. “I think I could’ve been better before I got myself into some of those situations, like the hit-by-pitch, or walking [Mike] Trout. But I think overall the adjustments in- game and being able to work with the defense there to get out of some of those innings when they were threatening.”

The Rays, winning for only the third time in their last 19 games, got two RBI from first baseman Logan Morrison on a home run and a single. Brad Miller also had two hits, including a home run. Steven Souza had two hits as well.

“Feels good to get a win,” said Rays’ manager Kevin Cash. “Kinda difficult to come by these days, so it’s nice. Matt Moore set the tone; he threw the ball really well. If you go back to Matt’s last three or four ballgames, he’s just been outstanding. You take away one inning in Baltimore that got away from us a little bit, other than that he’s given us every opportunity to keep games within reach and win ballgames. He’s on a really good run; that’s great to see.”

For the Rays, rookie Ryan Garton had his first save.

“Obviously, the back end of the bullpen today, to come into that situation, we’re asking some guys we know aren’t accustomed to doing things like that at the major league level,” Cash said. “Hopefully Ryan Garton’s got a smile ear-to-ear and doesn’t wipe it off all night. Really happy for him.”

In his last appearance, Garton gave up four straight hits as the Rays’ gave up eight runs to blow a 7-2 lead in the ninth.

“I got the opportunity and was super excited that I did my job, and we got a win as a team. Being able to get the win as a team is a huge thing right now. To get this team back on the winning train is nice.”

Jake Odorizzi pitches for the Rays Tuesday against the Angels’ Tim Lincecum.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Tampa Bay Rays lose yet again to Tigers despite solid start by Chris Archer

Even when they get unusually good starting pitching, the day ends in the usual disappointment for the Tampa Bay Rays.

Despite getting one of Chris Archer’s finest starts – 5 2/3 of three-hit, shutout baseball – the Rays’ bullpen faltered again in a 5-1 loss to the Detroit Tigers. It concluded the first half of the season at 33-48. The Rays have won only two of their last 18 games.

Tampa Bay has given up at least five runs in all but two of those 18 games.

“I can’t help but feel really good about what Chris Archer did today,” said manager Kevin Cash.  “He looked like he kicked it in gear and kind of showed up the Archer we know he’s very capable of being. That was an outstanding effort, an outstanding performance for him to even come remotely close to getting his pitch count back in order the way he did after the first, I believe he had 50 pitches the first two innings. You don’t foresee guys going that deep like he did. Just an outstanding effort by Arch

“We can’t help but to be excited about his individual outing. The loss is frustrating, as they all are, but the outing that Chris provided— and a lot of our starters recently have done a nice job—we’re just coming up short maybe at the end of ball games.”

The Rays led 1-0 going into the eighth inning, but the Tigers scored three times in the eighth and two more in the ninth. In the eighth, a groundout by Victor Martinez scored the tying run. Justin Upton’s double then gave the Tigers the lead.

A two-run homer by Ian Kinsler was the big blow.

“I really didn’t change anything,” Archer said. “It’s just 18 pitches in, I was a lot better than the first 18 pitches. It’s frustrating, but it’s definitely not something I dwell on. It does alter the course of the game and makes the bullpen come in earlier than need be, but I don’t beat myself up over it. It’s just, for some reason, the first 10 of 15 pitches just haven’t been ideal for me. But a day like today, it’s not something I beat myself up over because you have to move forward, and you have to give the team your best after all that stuff happens and I think I did a decent job of that today.”

Tampa Bay managed only six hits for the day.

Matt Moore starts for the Rays today against the Los Angeles Angels.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons