Florida’s unemployment rate holds at 4.7% in June

Florida’s unemployment rate remained unchanged in June, marking the second month in a row where the jobless rate was at 4.7 percent.

The rate has steadily been on the decline, and the June unemployment numbers mark the lowest rate since 2007. The rate is below the national unemployment rate of 4.9 percent in June.

“Florida added another solid chapter to our economic story in June,” said Cissy Proctor, executive director of the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. “Our unemployment rate is below the national rate, even while nearly 1,000 people are moving in Florida each day and searching for new jobs.”

According to the Department of Economic Opportunity, all of the state’s metro areas had year-over-year job gains in June. The Orlando metro area led the state, adding 49,000 private-sector jobs from June 2015 to June 2016.

In an area known as a tourist destination, it likely comes as no surprise the leisure and hospitality industry saw significant gains in the one-year period. According to the governor’s office, the leisure and hospitality sector added 13,500 new jobs year-over-year; followed by the construction industry with 9,500 new jobs; and the education and health services with 8,300 new jobs.

The unemployment rate for the Orlando metro area was 4.5 percent in June.

“Our focus on cutting taxes and making it easier for businesses to create new opportunities is clearly working to put Florida on the path to becoming first for jobs,” said Gov. Rick Scott in a statement Friday.

The Tampa Bay area added 44,900 private sector jobs year-over-year, and had an unemployment rate of 4.6 percent in June. The professional and business services industry saw 14,700 new jobs in the year-long period, followed by the leisure and hospitality industry with 7,400 new jobs.

Scott announced the monthly jobs numbers at Port Tampa Bay Friday morning during the commission of two new post-Panamax gantry cranes to help the port accommodate larger container vessels.

The state added 102,600 new jobs since January. The Naples Republicans said the state’s annual job growth has “outpaced the nation for more than 50 consecutive months” and more than 1.2 million Floridians “have found new opportunities to get a job and provide for their families.”

Monroe County had the state’s lowest unemployment rate in June, at 3.1 percent. Hendry County had the highest unemployment rate last month, with an unemployment rate of 10 percent.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Joe Henderson: Making America afraid again

It was a dark and stormy night …

That oft-mocked opening to novelist Edward Bulwer-Lytton’s 1830 work “Paul Clifford” – hey, no plagiarizing here; I give credit – seems to have inspired Donald Trump’s downbeat vision of America today.

Shining city on a hill?

More like Dracula’s castle at the bottom of a deep ravine.

What Trump was really trying to do was Make America Afraid Again in his acceptance speech Thursday night to close the Republican convention. After planting that bleak imagery in the nation’s psyche, Trump then, of course, paints himself as the only one capable of saving us all.

It is Hillary Clinton’s turn now to convince America that Trump is wrong. He is getting an expected convention bump in the polls.

I was still awaiting more definitive data after Trump’s speech, but the Hill.com reported the Reuters-Ipsos poll showed the candidate had pulled within four points of Clinton after the first three days of the convention.

That’s not bad considering how utterly nuts things seemed at times in the GOP gathering on the shore of Lake Erie. But barring something we can’t yet imagine, Clinton likely will get her bounce during next week’s Democratic convention in Philly, so then it will be on to November.

Here are some final takeaways from the Trump coronation:

KID POWER: The best speech of the convention was a tie between Trump’s children: Donald Jr. and daughter Ivanka.

Junior showed his oratory chops with a fiery defense of his father on Tuesday, even if there was a little kerfuffle over a line that was taken from a May speech by conservative Frank Buckley. That fire got quickly doused when Buckley noted that since he helped with Junior’s speech, he couldn’t plagiarize himself. Fair point, plus recycling in any form probably went over well with environmentalists.

Ivanka was sensational. She undersold expectations in advance, admitting she was terrified of speaking on such a large stage, but she looked right at home in the spotlight.

SCOTT, BONDI TAKE THEIR TURN: Florida Gov. Rick Scott and Attorney General Pam Bondi were granted time at the mic during the convention.

Scott, in particular, was not treated kindly by Twitter Nation. Maybe we’re numb to his wooden cadence and an expression that suggests fire could shoot from his eyes at any moment, but for much of the nation, this was their first chance to meet him.

Here is a sampling of Twitter smackdowns, with a hat-tip to Romper.com for compiling:

“Rick Scott’s #gopconvention speech lacked the kind of sinister gravitas you’d expect from Lex Luthor’s younger brother” – @PoliticalRiff.

“Seeing (P)Rick Scott tonight on GOP stage was absolutely degrading to all Floridians, and a general embarrassment to the GOP. #WorstGovEver” – @DigitalXtreme.

“Rick Scott’s speech at the RNC is making me gag” @erin_bakes.

Bondi made eyebrows raise all over when she encouraged the mob/crowd in a “Lock her up!” chant about Clinton.

Bondi should be more circumspect, seeing how it looks to have received a $25,000 campaign donation from Trump right around the time she decided not to investigate allegations of fraud against Trump University.

UNITED WE CRUZ: Sen. Ted Cruz did something few would have thought possible giving the rocky way this convention started. He appeared to unite Republicans when he refused to endorse Trump. They were united against him. He was booed off the stage at the end of his speech.

It’s a coin flip right now whether Republicans hate Cruz or Clinton the most, but I wouldn’t write him off yet. If Trump gets walloped in November, Cruz is well-positioned to remind the party that he told them so. Whether they flock to him then is questionable, but I wouldn’t rule it out.

WINNERS:  The Family Trump. The city of Cleveland (hey, no eruptions!). Chris Christie, for both knowing his place and that fireball speech he gave about prosecuting Hillary Clinton. Mike Pence, who handled the aftermath of the Cruz controversy well by delivering a speech that soothed the masses.

LOSERS: Whatever TV genius decided to place the MSNBC set out where protestors could distract viewers with various signs like “Capitalism Sucks” while the host was trying to interview someone. Ted Cruz, for the moment anyway. But the game is still afoot. Paul Manafort, Trump’s more-or-less campaign manager, who let the plagiarism controversy over Melania Trump’s speech turn into a story that lasted into the third day of the convention. He should have had that fire put out by lunch time on the day it broke.

Now it’s on to Philly.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Carlos Beruff looking for that Donald Trump/Rick Scott coattail

In a modestly housed and attended town hall meeting in Orlando, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Carlos Beruff made it clear he’s still striving for that image identifying him as the outside warrior, Donald Trump/Rick Scott-style candidate.

Beruff, whose chances in the Aug. 30 Republican U.S. Senate primary plummeted when incumbent U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio filed late for re-election in late June, showed he has lost little of his “I’m-not-Washington” swagger, even as the appearance showed his campaign looking like it might have been in the opening days of a seven-month run, not in the closing weeks.

His town hall meeting was held in the backroom of a small, noisy downtown Orlando pizza parlor. It was attended by only 14 or 15 citizens, not including three or four local Republican officials and candidates who came to support or watch him. Almost all of the regular voters there were over 70. And many seethed the kind of anger common among Trump supporters, in this case, aimed almost equally at Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Rubio, whom many blamed for having abandoned them and his conservative promises of 2010.

The 58-year-old homebuilder from Bradenton made it clear he felt their pain, as well as his own, after he saw Rubio jump in with millions of dollars and legions of party regulars.

“Me, I have to work to get people to come hear me,” Beruff said. “I’m Carlos Nobody, right?”

He shouldn’t be; not after hiring some of the smartest campaign team members in Florida, spending six months on the campaign trail, and spending hundreds of thousands of dollars — much of it his own money — on statewide television commercials and internet advertising linking to his campaign site.

But there he was, in a tiny venue five weeks out from the election, his voice sometimes competing with jovial diners just around the corner, and a waiter shouting, “Caesar salad? Who had the Caesar salad?”

Beruff’s message was as straightforward and blunt as ever, with the new Rubio twist. Washington is broken. The Democrats are gambling away America’s future. Gov. Rick Scott (whom he repeatedly cited as his friend and inspiration) and Trump have shown the way out. And he’s a part of that way out, promising, among other things, putting a two-term limit on himself.

“Over the years what has happened is a lot of people have disappointed me. They come into my office. They want my support. They want my money. They get there, and now they worry about the next election and forget about what they said,” he said.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Rick Scott: ‘This election is about the very survival of the American Dream’

Calling the election critical to the future of the country, Gov. Rick Scott urged Americans to vote for Donald Trump come November.

“I know some people have reservations about my friend Donald Trump. Perhaps he’s not sometimes polite. He can be a little rough. And for some people he may be too direct,” said Scott in his seven-minute speech at the Republican National Convention on Wednesday.

“But this election is not about Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton. In fact, it’s not the election about you or me. This election is about the very survival of the American Dream,” he said. “It’s time for all Americans to put down partisan banners, vote for the survival of the greatest country in the world, and do the right thing … vote for Donald Trump.”

Scott was the first speaker of the evening, and kicked off the night with remarks that touched on terrorism and the future of the country. The Naples Republican said the country needed a president who tells it like it is, someone who “isn’t afraid of Washington” and “doesn’t believe government is the answer to every problem.”

“We need a president who recognizes great countries have borders. We need a president who brings American jobs back to America. We need a president who is not afraid to say radical Islamic terrorism. We need a president who will wipe ISIS off the face of the Earth,” he said. “On every one of those measures, Hillary Clinton fails. She fails, she fails, she fails.”

While Scott declined to endorse Trump ahead of the March 15 primary, it was clear he was a fan of the New York Republican. In January, he wrote a glowing editorial about Trump in USA Today, saying he was “capturing the frustration of many Americans.”

Scott endorsed Trump one day after the March 15 primary, and was often mentioned as a potential vice presidential candidate. He brushed off the suggestion, saying he didn’t want the job.

Scott is widely believed to be considering a U.S. Senate run in 2018, and the speech has could be seen as a launching pad onto the national stage. Scott can’t run for governor again because of term limits.

A former health care executive, Scott played out his — and Trump’s — outsider status. In his remarks, he called 2016 the year “we get to fire the politicians.”

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Rick Scott appoints judges in Pinellas, Pasco counties

Gov. Rick Scott appointed two lawyers to judgeships Tuesday to replace judges who have resigned from the bench.

Scott appointed Joshua Riba, 41, of Safety Harbor, to the Pinellas County Court to replace Judge William H. Overton. Overton is assigned to county traffic cases, according to the Sixth Judicial Circuit.

Riba has been an assistant state attorney for the Sixth Judicial Circuit since 2010. Riba received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland and his law degree from the University of Florida

Joseph A. Poblick, 41, of Dade City, was appointed to the Pasco County Court. He will replace Judge Marc H. Salton, who is retiring. Salton presides over misdemeanors, DUI and criminal traffic cases, according to Pasco County records.

Poblick  has been an attorney with the Law Offices of Joseph A. Poblick since 2005. Poblick began his legal career as an assistant state attorney for the Ninth Judicial Circuit in 2001. He has served as city attorney for the municipalities of Zephyrhills and Port Richey. In 2012, Poblick ran unsuccessfully in a four-way primary to replace retiring judge Robert P. Cole.

Poblick received his bachelor’s degree from the University of South Florida and his law degree from Loyola University.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Donald Trump to hold fundraiser in Tampa days after RNC

Donald Trump will be in Tampa on Tuesday, July 26, to appear at a fundraiser on his behalf.

The event will be hosted by Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Preibus. 

Governor Rick Scott will also be in attendance, along with Florida House Speaker Steve Crisafulli, St. Pete business magnate Bill Edwards, Tampa Bay area philanthropist Les Muma, Hillsborough County Aviation Authority Chairman Robert Watkins, Outback Steakhouse founder Chris T. Sullivan, Port Tampa Bay Chairman  Steve Swindal and developer Joe Williams.

The site has for the fundraiser has yet to be announced.

Later in the day, Trump will then travel to Miami for another fundraiser at 7 p.m. that evening.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Rick Scott gearing up for GOP convention speech

Gov. Rick Scott brushed off questions about whether Donald Trump would be able to secure the nomination next week, saying the New York Republican is the clear winner.

“He clearly won the delegates,” said Scott during a stop in Naples on Friday. “My goal is that we have a great convention, and we highlight where we’re going as a country and a party, and we have a big win and change the direction of this country.”

Scott is one of dozens of people slated to speak during the Republican National Convention next week. The Naples Republican praised Trump early in the primary cycle but did not endorse him until after Florida’s March 15 primary. Since then, he has been a vocal supporter of the New York Republican and was often mentioned as a potential running mate.

Trump announced Friday he selected Indiana Gov. Mike Pence to be his running mate. During his stop in Naples, Scott told reporters he had made it clear to Trump he wasn’t interested in the No. 2 spot.

“I’ve been clear all along,” he said. “I have a great job, and I want to keep this job.”

Scott said he is excited to go to the convention, noting he missed most of the 2012 Republican convention in Tampa because of a hurricane. Republicans cut the conference short by a day because of the storm threat. Scott was also scheduled to speak at that event.

“I’m going to talk about why we ought to elect Donald Trump,” said Scott. “We need a business person. We need someone who is going to destroy ISIS. We need someone who is going to focus on jobs. And that’s what he’s going to do.”

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi is also scheduled to speak at the convention.

Floridians heading up to Cleveland for the event will have a jam-packed schedule, including breakfasts, tailgate parties and a reception.

The Republican Party of Florida released a rundown of events Friday morning. Delegates will be able to participate in a breakfast speaker series hosted by the state party and Speaker Designate Richard Corcoran. Speakers at the breakfasts include Frank Luntz, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Dick Morris, and former Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

Presidential hopeful Ben Carson is scheduled to attend a breakfast hosted by Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam.

“With Florida being front and center as the largest swing state, we are excited to welcome these great speakers to the conversation of Making Florida Red Again and Making America Great Again,” said Blaise Ingoglia, the chair of the Florida GOP and a state representative.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Mitch Perry Report for 7.15.16 – No Tebowing in Cleveland

Bad news for folks who were psyched that Tim Tebow was announced on Thursday to be a featured speaker at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Like Ben Roethlisberger and Tom Brady before him, Tebow became the latest (former) pro quarterback who has disavowed any intentions that he would be speaking at Donald Trump’s party next week.

“My goal has always been to be able to make a difference in the biggest way possible. And if one day that’s in the political realm, that’s what I’ll do,” Tebow said on his Instagram account last night. “But right now, I really believe that’s through my foundation and our amazing partners in fighting for kids who can’t fight for themselves.”

The Republic, and the Republicans, will certainly survive an RNC sans Tebow, but how does that even happen? All the other folks named yesterday: Pam Bondi, Rick Scott, Mary Fallin, Peter Thiel, etc., all will speak. It’s just sort of odd.

Although he’s delaying his announcement about his running mate today, all indications are that Trump will select Indiana Governor Mike Pence to be his running mate – unless he changes his mind overnight, that is.

The Tampa Bay Times Michael Auslen forwards the story we reported on last week – there aren’t any upcoming U.S. Senate primary debates coming up soon, and it appears as though Patrick Murphy is the reason why.

Catherine Welch from WMFE radio in Orlando, who was coordinating radio debates across Florida public radio stations, wrote to me yesterday that the Murphy camp confirmed that they received her invitation on May 30th, “yet the campaign says it can not fit our Aug 3rd 9:00am debate into the schedule.”

And the Times Rick Danielson reports on a story that we meant to get to but didn’t (so props to him) – that organizers in Tampa of a referendum that would replace the city’s citizen review board with something stronger will not make the deadline of 21,000 signatures to get on this November’s ballot.

“I don’t think will make it this ballot,” the Reverend Russell Meyer told me on Monday before a Black Lives Matter protest began at Lykes Gaslight Park. “Something like what we’re talking about will be on the Tampa Charter Review Committee that City Council is talking about.” He also mentioned electing a different City Council to change how the board is composed, but of course, with the exception of the District 7 race this fall, the board won’t turn over until 2019.

In other news…

A new Hillary Clinton campaign office opened in Ybor City last night, and there was lots of excited folks there – not too many of them under 40, though.

Christine Quinn is the South Tampa businesswoman who is taking on Kathy Castor in Florida’s 14th Congressional District this fall.

The Tampa City Council is close to approving a franchise agreement with developer Jeff Vinik’s Strategic Property Partners and Cascade Investments for an underground chiller for the Channelside development.

Any Libertarians out there? There’s a contested Senate battle next month, and we’ve got a poll on who’s leading in that race.

The Florida League of Women Voters is getting into advocacy and education regarding solar power.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

Arthenia Joyner and Janet Cruz help open up Hillary Clinton campaign office in Ybor City

Tampa based state Senator Arthenia Joyner got to the point in addressing a packed audience that crowded into the new campaign headquarters for the Hillary Clinton campaign on Thursday night.

“We know what it means to hand our future to a billionaire businessman,” she said, comparing the Democrats bete noire in Florida with Donald Trump. “We don’t need a Rick Scott clone in the White House. Is that what we want to see? Do we really want an instant replay with what we’ve witnessed first hand in the state of Florida? Hell no!”

The crowd cheered lustily as they gathered in the new office, located on 7th Avenue and 22nd Street in Ybor City.

Joyner, the outgoing Senate Minority Leader, then shared the tiny stage with Tampa state Representative Janet Cruz, the incoming House Minority Leader in 2017.

Cruz, who turned 60 last week, then asked for 20 women who were 60 years old or older to stand in front of her on the makeshift stage. As they crowded the stage, Cruz discussed how Jackie Onassis was a woman who was an idol for women like her mother in the early 1960’s.

“That was the woman she looked up to,” Cruz began. “But today is a completely new day. Not only is my mentor a former first lady, and a secretary (of state), but she’s going to be the first female president of the United States!,” as the crowd erupted in cheers.

However, what was instructive to note was that there were many others in the audience were 60 years of age and over, with nary a millennial in the room.

“Maybe this room isn’t the best representation of all Clinton supporters,” admitted Asher Edelson, at 22 one of the youngest people in the room not working or volunteering for the Clinton campaign. Clinton’s recently vanquished Democratic primary opponent, Bernie Sanders, has just endorsed Clinton, and the hopes for many in the Clinton campaign is that his backing will bring many of his young supporters to her side.

“The reason a lot of people are so enamored by Bernie Sanders and almost in love with what he was doing was that his issues mean a lot to young people,” Edelson added.”I feel like a lot of  millenians are issue driven, and the more issues that Hilary and  her campaign target for the good of the people, are more likely to attract those young voters.”

Clinton has adopted and/or modified some of Sanders signatures issues that appealed to his supporters. Last week she proposed a plan to eliminate tuition at in-state public colleges and universities for families with annual incomes up to $125,000.

“I was watching  the news the other night and they were interviewing a Bernie Sanders supporter,” said Tampa resident Michael Pullera, “and they were saying they just couldn’t trust Hillary and they were going to vote Libertarian, because they couldn’t drive themselves to vote Republican, but that doesn’t help the cause.”

New Clinton campaign offices have opened this week in Miami and Tallahassee, and the energy among partisans is strong as the Democratic National Convention nears later this month. But Thursday’s event also took place a day after a Quinnipiac poll showed Clinton trailing Trump 42 percent to 39 percent in the Sunshine State, compared to a 47 – 39 percent Clinton lead on June 21. The poll was taken in the days since FBI Director James Comey called Hillary Clinton’s use of a personal email server “extremely careless,” and Democratic Party strategist Anna Cruz concedes that has taken a toll.

“Do I think she got dinged a little bit on the email FBI stuff? Yeah, but you know what? I think the voters are going to get a real opportunity between now and the series of debates to get a good look at both of these candidates, what they stand for, and how they hold up against one another,” she said. “I think it’s going ot be very evident an dvery clear who’s experienced and ready to lead when they take over the White House in Janaury and who’s not, and voters are going to have a very clear distinction.”

Other Clinton supporters agreed.

“I think people are just starting to pay attention to this election and as people learn more and more about Trump, there’s no way our country is going to be able to support his bigotry and his hatred of so many different communities,” said Tampa attorney and Hillsborough County Commission candidate Brian Willis, one of several Democrats on the ballot next month making the rounds. “Florida is such a diverse state, with a large Hispanic population, and you’ve got Donald Trump attacking those people, whereas Hillary is so positive.”

It wasn’t just Hillary supporters in the room. Before the event began, Hillsborough County Republican Executive Committee Chair Deb Tamargo brought cookies from Alessi’s Bakery with a picture of Donald Trump to introduce herself to her counterpart, Hillsborough County Democratic Party Executive Chair Ione Townsend.

“I wanted to meet her and say hello,” Tamargo said. “I brought her a letter expressing how we need to tap down all of our people and none of this crazy stuff,” the two shook hands, though Townsend reportedly eschewed the Trump cookies.

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us

In Tallahassee, Allison Tant talks Cleveland, Mike Pence and Patrick Murphy’s A-game

Allison Tant 2With Florida Republicans heading to their national convention in Cleveland next week and the Florida Democrats following to their convention the next week in Philadelphia, we caught up with Florida Democratic Party Chair Allison Tant.

She, along with Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, opened a field office for Hillary Clinton’s campaign in downtown Tallahassee Thursday evening.

What do you think about Rick Scott, Pam Bondi and Tim Tebow on the RNC stage?

“It’s the folks who are most like Donald Trump. He’s going to have the people he thinks will parrot his views the best at his own convention. It doesn’t really come as a surprise to me.”

Recent polls show a very close race in Florida between Clinton and Trump, a concern?

“I think it’s going to come and go. Florida is a purple state. We are a swing state … polls for that reason are very tight. I think they’re going to narrow and enlarge and narrow and enlarge.”

Comparing the upcoming RNC with the DNC:

“I don’t think most Floridians are going to be happy with what they see (at the RNC) at least I don’t think so. And then we’re going to have the Democratic Convention, and we have worked very hard to make sure our Democratic Convention speaks to America and is reflective of the broad communities across America. I expect a bump after the convention. I think this last week was a difficult week, and I think it is going to get better.”

Trump picking Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate:

“As a woman, I personally find him offensive on what he has done on women’s rights in his state as governor. We have a clear track record we could look to, and I find him a curious choice. I’m actually surprised that he took it. But we are looking at what he stood for and what he has done, and we’re going to be messaging quite a bit on that.”

The Clinton campaign has spent more than $12 million on TV advertising Florida, while Trump has spent virtually nothing, but is very competitive:

“Trump is the master of reality TV. He doesn’t have to do what we have to do to get the attention. He’s also gotten some help on his side with all the national media in DC and everything. We’re going to turn the page on all of that in the days ahead. We’ll right the ship again.”

Some have suggested Democrats are lagging in registration efforts this year:

“I don’t agree with that because we’re just getting started on all of that. We are just ramping up with our partners; we just brought on board 240, 250 staff people now to start working on all of that. We have an aggressive vote-by-mail effort going across the state of Florida right now, including Leon County … We are just gearing up. Our partners are just gearing up. I’m not concerned about all of that and also the NPAs (no party affiliations) tend to vote more Democratic.

Bill Clinton has already been a big presence in Florida, will Barack Obama play a similar role?

“I suspect so. I’m planning on it. I think that he will be here. I think that Florida is too important.”

Who will be the Florida Democrats’ version of Tim Tebow at the DNC?

“I don’t want a Tim Tebow speaking for my side. We have some great speakers we are just lining up right now. We are finishing the lineup, including some strong Florida people that I am not at liberty to discuss … You’re going to have some really great people from Florida on the national stage.”

Worried about Patrick Murphy’s series of missteps in his U.S. Senate campaign?

“Of course, I’m concerned. But I think that he can overcome it. He is going to come here (Tallahassee) next week. I think he is going to be putting his A game on … He’s going to be stepping forward on the (water quality and algae issues in his district) … This is something he has gotten right since day one.”

Share On Facebook
Share On Twitter
Share On Google Plus
Share On Linkedin
Share On Pinterest
Share On Reddit
Share On Stumbleupon
Share On Youtube
Contact us
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons