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Cask & Ale owners say manager illegally tried to trademark bar’s name for himself

Owners of the Cask & Ale, a successful downtown St. Petersburg restaurant and bar, are suing its operations manager for misconduct.

Brother’s Associates, partial owners of Cask & Ale, are going after Jeffrey Catherell, the popular eatery’s manager, after the company claimed Catherell was trying to trademark the restaurant’s name without permission.

They also say he was taking funds from the restaurant for his own benefit, and concealing financial and business information from Brother’s Associates.

The suit accuses Catherell of one count each of breach of fiduciary duty and fraudulent accounting.

Brother’s demands an accounting of all transactions, income, and expenses that relate to Catherell’s management of the company as well as costs and damages deemed appropriate by a court.

In 2013, Special Cask Blend purchased 25 percent of Brother’s Associates. In the Operating Agreement between the two companies, it was agreed that as Special Cask’s managing member, Catherell, would serve as day-to-day manager at Cask & Ale.

In April 2016, Brother’s learned Catherell begun to trademark “Cask & Ale,” despite Brother’s owning the right to the name.

Nevertheless, that ownership didn’t seem to stop Catherell from continuing the process. Behind the back of his partners, Catherell initiated a plan to license the name to others for profit.

He also began “diverting money and other property” for his own benefit, according to the suit.

The suit was filed Sept. 20, and Catherell was summoned the next day by the Sixth Judicial Circuit Court in Pinellas County.

In July, members of Brother’s voted to remove Catherell from all positions of authority. There is no word on his current situation at the company.

Cask & Ale, located at 29 Third St. N. in St. Petersburg, opened in 2014 and quickly became a success. The same people has previously run the Vintage Ultra Lounge, which was also in downtown St. Pete.

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Mike Mikurak bashes Charlie Justice for St. Pete sewage dumping

Mike Mikurak’s new campaign video focuses on millions of gallons of raw and partially treated sewage dumped by the city of St. Petersburg into Tampa Bay waters this past year.

Mikurak blames the failure to maintain the city’s infrastructure on a lack of county leadership. In particular, he targets his opponent, Charlie Justice, for that lack of leadership. Mikurak, a Republican, is challenging Justice, a Democrat, who is running for his second term on the Pinellas County Commission.

The video, which runs more than two minutes, is called “Pinellas County sewage dumping” with the tagline “Mike Mikurak addresses the sewer flooding and sewage dumping into Tampa Bay waters.”

The clip starts out with portions of news broadcasts showing protesters at a St. Pete meeting complaining about the wastewater the city dumped into the Bay.

Another segment has the captioning from ABC Action News: “Businesses blame St. Pete for contaminating marina. Claim toxic water is killing their livelihoods.”

Mikurak’s video asks: What is Charlie Justice’s solution?

It then segues to a tape of the Suncoast Tiger Bay Club debate featuring Mikurak and Justice. At the debate, Justice talked about a countywide task force he had formed to work out a countywide solution to the problem.

These words flash on the screen: “Did Charlie Justice say a task force?”

The video breaks up, and Justice’s comment is repeated.

On the screen: “Another task force!”

Then: “What do you expect from a career politician?” “We need a leader.” “We need a leader who can get results.”

Next, the camera focuses on Mikurak who talks about the importance of maintaining infrastructure and asks why it wasn’t maintained. A task force, Mikurak says, is after the fact.

Unfortunately, Mikurak says, the leadership of the county has not done that. The pipes haven’t been touched.

Mikurak says the county should create and execute a plan to fix the sewer pipes right now.

District 3 is a countywide seat. The election is Nov. 8.

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City of St. Pete seeks tenant for Manhattan Casino

For months, community leaders from south St. Petersburg have lobbied city officials asking to take over the historic Manhattan Casino and make it a place to display African-American art and history.

They even gave officials a petition with more than 1,000 signatures supporting a proposal to move the Dr. Carter G. Woodson African-American Museum to the site.

But city officials have nixed that idea and, instead, are looking for a tenant willing to open a restaurant and event venue or catering business on the property at 642 22nd St. S. The city also would consider a retail tenant.

“It’s not even written in such a way that we would be eligible” to apply, said Terri Lipsey Scott, chair of the Woodson Museum. “It’s an absolute slight.”

Louis ArmstrongThe Manhattan Casino ranks as one of the most historic sites for St. Pete’s African-American community. Built in 1925, the venue became noted for its contributions to African-American art and culture. Some of the most legendary performers played there before it closed in 1968. Among them were James Brown, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Ray Charles, Nat King Cole, and Fats Domino.

The site reopened in 2013 as Sylvia’s, a soul food restaurant. The restaurant had financial difficulties and the city took back possession of the property earlier this year.

Since then, Scott and others have urged city officials to allow the Woodson Museum to expand to the location. The idea, Scott said, would have been to use the current museum property, 2240 9th Ave. S., as a cultural center and expand the museum to the Manhattan Casino site.

Instead, on Thursday, city council members authorized advertising for developers, end-users, and interested parties to submit a plan for leasing and running a restaurant and event venue or catering business from the site.

The city does not plan to let the building sit while waiting for a tenant.

“During this interim period while the city seeks a restaurant to fill the void left by Sylvia’s closing, the city has the opportunity to utilize and program the second floor space,” the proposal says. “In order to honor the Manhattan Casino’s rich, vibrant history and ensure it remains a lively gathering space, the city of St. Petersburg will soon be accepting private event reservations.”

The deadline for submitting a proposal is 1 p.m. Nov. 21.

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Jack Latvala calls for delegation to meet again to discuss Pinellas sewer woes

State Sen. Jack Latvala has called for a follow-up workshop meeting of the Pinellas legislative delegation to hear and discuss the effects of the recent discharge of untreated sewage into Tampa Bay waters by cities in Pinellas County during Hurricane Hermine.

The meeting will be Nov. 16, from 9-11:30 a.m. at the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Education and Conference Center, 701 4th St. S. in St. Petersburg.

Part of the event will be a presentation by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. This meeting will be in a workshop format, and while the public is invited to attend, it must end promptly at 11:30 a.m., so there may be limited time for public input.

It will be the second time the Clearwater Republican called a delegation meeting to discuss the county’s sewer woes.

The first meeting, in September, came after St. Petersburg discharged untreated and partially treated wastewater into Tampa Bay as Hurricane Hermine passed in the Gulf.

That discharge was the second time this year St. Petersburg had to pump wastewater into Tampa Bay. When Tropical Storm Colin hit in June, water made its way into leaky pipes and overloaded the system.

Part of the problem arose from the closure of the Albert Whitted sewer plant, which reduced capacity in the city’s sewer system.

Although St. Petersburg has been the main focus for sewer problems, other Pinellas municipalities — including Gulfport, St. Pete Beach, and Tarpon Springs — also experienced sewer overflows.

The delegation is only one group focusing on the county’s sewer issues, which local officials blame on an aging system and long-term failure to maintain the overall system.

Gov. Rick Scott called for a DEP investigation into St. Petersburg’s sewer discharges, which his office said amount to more than 150 million gallons.

A few days before, St. Petersburg had signed a consent order with the DEP after the agency found environmental violations to have occurred at three specific times. The first was Aug. 2-10, 2015, when more than 31.5 million gallons of raw sewage dumped into Clam Bayou and surrounding neighborhoods.

Mayor Rick Kriseman and the St. Petersburg City Council have authorized an investigation into the city’s water resources department to find out why information concerning the closure of the Albert Whitted plant was not given to higher ups.

And on Monday, a task force met for the first time to discuss possible countywide solutions to the issues. The panel, convened by Pinellas County Commissioner Charlie Justice, is made up of elected and technical representatives from the county, cities, and community and privately owned sewer systems.

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St. Pete closes emergency operations center; Pinellas EOC remains open

St. Petersburg closed its emergency operations center, opened to handle issues related to Hurricane Matthew, at 9 a.m. Friday.

No significant damage was reported, St. Petersburg officials said, although one downed tree branch briefly blocked traffic on 4th Street South at 59th Avenue. Wind speeds stayed between 18 mph and 26 mph overnight, with gusts reaching 33 mph, they said. Seven people spent the night at the shelter at Northside Baptist Church, 6000 38th Ave. N.

St. Petersburg officials said the city forecast is calling for 1 inch of rain and breezy conditions. Strong rip currents expected for the next few days. There is possibly a higher-than-normal high tide expected for later today, although no street flooding is anticipated unless the city gets heavier rainfall than expected.

Pinellas County officials continue to closely monitor Hurricane Matthew for potential impacts to the area. The county’s emergency operations center and citizens’ information center both remain open, as do all county government offices. Residents can call the citizens’ information center at 727-464-4333 for general information.

The National Weather Service is forecasting sustained winds of 25 mph to 35 mph and occasional storm bands with 40 mph to 45 mph wind gusts, similar to summer thunderstorms, to impact Pinellas County until noon. There is a high risk of rip currents for all Pinellas beaches and tides 2 feet above normal from Tarpon Springs to Indian Rocks Beach. Clearwater Beach is expecting a northwest wind influence that is expected to cause wave run-up and beach erosion.

The price gouging law is also in effect. Effective only during a declared state of emergency, the price gouging law prohibits sharp increases in the price of essential commodities, such as food, water, hotels, ice, gasoline, lumber, and equipment needed as a direct result of an official declared emergency. Violators are subject to civil penalties of $1,000 per violation, up to a total of $25,000 for multiple violations committed in a single 24-hour period.

Residents who suspect price gouging can report it to Pinellas County Consumer Protection at 727-464-6200 and are also encouraged to report it to the Attorney General’s hotline at 1-866-9-NO-SCAM.

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Joe Henderson: Issue 1 in 2018 Gov’s race, fixing Florida environment

I think we have one of our first major campaign issues for the 2018 race to succeed Rick Scott as Florida’s governor. Any serious candidate who doesn’t come out strongly in favor seriously beefing up the state Department of Environmental Protection will miss a great opportunity.

In just the last couple of months alone, an understaffed and likely overwhelmed DEP has had to deal with the algae bloom that threatened to trash summer tourism in Stuart and surrounding areas.

Recriminations are still flying back and forth in the sewage overflow in St. Petersburg and the surrounding area in the aftermath of Hurricane Hermine. DEP was called in to investigate.

There is the ongoing disaster in Polk County, where hundreds of millions of gallons of contaminated water is falling through a massive sinkhole and mixing with the aquifer that provides drinking water for the state.

And let’s not forget that millions of honeybees died in South Florida after being sprayed with a pesticide that was supposed to attack Zika-carrying mosquitoes.

Environmental Cassandras have warned for a while now to expect a season like this. They point to Scott’s obsession at creating private-sector jobs as a big part of the problem. Strict environmental standards can be bad for business because they can increase costs. Since Scott took office in 2011, critics continually argue his business-friendly policies led to lax environmental oversight.

The irony, of course, is that the environmental problems this year are demonstrably bad for the state’s business. We can’t do anything to stop a hurricane, but the algae bloom is said to be a direct result of chemical runoff into Lake Okeechobee.

Weather.com referred to it as a “guacamole-like blue-green sludge” that had the added impact of smelling really bad. That message went out all over the country.

Scott declared a state of emergency, although a better course might have been to keep tougher regulations so the bloom wouldn’t occur to begin with.

And the building disaster in Polk County has the potential to haunt Floridians for years. Scott visited the sinkhole site this week and ordered some tough new policies to inform the public when these things happen. Nice. But it also has the effect of closing the barn door a bit late after the gypsum stack created by phosphate giant Mosaic started sinking into our water supply.

Environmentalists have long been at odds with Mosaic’s practices. The Tampa Bay Rays baseball team found that out in 2010 when it reached a tentative deal to sell naming rights to its spring training complex in Port Charlotte to the company.

The deal fell apart after vocal and widespread opposition because critics said a plan by Mosaic to mine along the Peace River could have had disastrous effects on Charlotte Harbor.

When the company tried to point to the money Charlotte County would make in the naming deal, The Sarasota Herald Tribune quoted Adam Cummings, “I will not take their 30 pieces of silver or step foot in any stadium under the name Mosaic.”

Floridians care deeply about their environment. They vote consistently in large numbers to protect it. Those good intentions have often been trampled in Tallahassee, though, in the name of commerce and expansion.

With two years left in Scott’s term, potential candidates are preparing bids to succeed him. A good way to start might be with a pledge to get serious about protecting the fragile environment of this state we love. And whoever wins should prove they mean it.

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St. Pete Yacht Club nears limit for Cuban regatta

The St. Petersburg Yacht Club is nearing its goal for the number of boats participating in its St. Petersburg-Habana Race 2017, which launches from downtown St. Petersburg on Feb. 28.

The regatta has generated an enthusiastic response nationwide from the sailing community since it was announced Aug. 1 that the 107-year-old yacht club is reviving the St. Petersburg-Habana Race, which it staged from 1930 to 1959.

“We are excited about the growing number of entrants signing up to participate in this regatta, but I can’t say I’m surprised by this strong show of support,” said Richard Winning, commodore of the St. Petersburg Yacht Club and lifelong resident of St. Petersburg. “Growing up here, this regatta was always a big part of the culture of our city. The return of this regatta is as much about the people of St. Petersburg as it is about the St. Petersburg Yacht Club, and we are proud to preserve this piece of our community legacy.”

After finishing 284 nautical miles of competitive sailing, the boaters will enjoy three days of festivities in Cuba — including another 12-mile race — before heading home.

The 2017 St. Petersburg-Habana Race is capped at 80 boats.

The deadline for confirmed entry is Nov. 7, when all fees are due. The closing date for “People-to-People” travel packages is also Nov. 7, at 11:59 a.m. 

The Cuba experience is not restricted to yacht competitors or members of the Club. Anyone can take part in a licensed “people-to-people” program associated with the race.

Boaters interested in further details about the competition can click here more information and access the notice of race. Click here for information on the “People-to-People” program. The St. Petersburg Yacht Club has brought in ASC International USA to offer packages to people traveling by air. They consist of three five-day/four-night packages, and three weekend (three-day/two night) packages.

The St. Petersburg-Habana Race, conceived by George “Gidge” Gandy in the late 1920s as a promotional event for the city, first launched on March 30, 1930, at the St. Petersburg Municipal Pier. It quickly became one of the city’s signature events.

The event was suspended in 1942 because of World War II and resumed in 1946.

Military and political unrest in Cuba threatened the race in the latter 1950s, and it was last run in 1959, as gun-wielding revolutionaries patrolled the streets of Havana. Recent breakthroughs in U.S.-Cuba relations prompted club officials to reinstitute one of its most historically significant events.

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St. Pete, Gulfport celebrate two cities, one street

St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman and Gulfport Mayor Sam Henderson will work together this Saturday to help clean up a street that’s common to both cities.

After the cleanup, St. Petersburg police Chief Anthony Holloway and Gulfport police Chief Rob Vincent will hold their own community event to discuss how the departments are collaborating on issues common to the 49th Street South corridor that both share.

“This event brings residents from both great cities together to work collaboratively along the 49th Street corridor,” St. Petersburg spokesman Ben Kirby said. “Mayor Kriseman is looking forward to standing with Mayor Henderson, and with members of the City of St. Petersburg team, for the third year in a row to help make St. Petersburg and Gulfport shine.”

The event is sponsored by the Gulfport Neighbors and Childs Park community associations.

Registration for the event begins at 7:45 a.m. at the east end of the Tangerine Greenway, which is at Tangerine Avenue and 49th Street South. The mayors’ welcome will begin at 8:30 a.m. with cleanup scheduled to begin at 9 a.m.

The chiefs’ discussion on ways the departments are working together to curb crime in the mutual area is scheduled to kick off at 10:30 a.m. The setting will be informal and residents are encouraged to ask questions, express concerns, and offer suggestions.

Festivities, including a lunch, prizes, and games, is scheduled to start at 11 a.m. Residents from St. Pete and Gulfport are welcome at the event.

St Pete Gulfport Cleanup

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Decision to reopen Albert Whitted sewage plant up to city council, Rick Kriseman says

St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman said Friday he’s leaving the decision to bring the Albert Whitted sewer plant back online up to city council members.

Kriseman said a consultant’s reported indicated the expense and time to bring the Albert Whitted Water Reclamation Facility up to a usable standard would be costly and time-consuming. The money and time, the consultant said, could be better used.

Kriseman also provided a quick update on the city’s progress in solving the city’s sewer woes.

City officials are moving as quickly as they can, he said, in hiring someone to do an audit of the city’s water resources department to discover the whos, whats and whens of a 2014 consultant’s report. The report warned the city that closing the Albert Whitted plant and diverting the flow to the nearby Southwest plant before the capacity at that plant was increased would be courting disaster.

“Most importantly,” Kriseman said of the external audit, it will find out “why the council didn’t see the report and why I didn’t see the report.”

Kriseman said he’s also devoting one employee in the city’s procurement department to purchases related to the water resources department and the sewer improvements. That should help move things along quickly, he said.

The city expects to have a timeline available in the next two weeks, he said, outlining the city’s plans going forward. Among those plans is the expenditure of about $58 million in the coming fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1. That money will be spent relining pipes and starting projects designed to increase the capacity of the system.

The city has earmarked an additional $230 million over the next five years for other improvements to the system, and another $8 million a year on pipes.

But Kriseman said it will all take time and will not solve the problems caused by lateral pipes – those leading from homes and businesses into the public system. Those, he said, will also have to be fixed to help prevent future flooding.

The mayor said he’s also hoping that other municipalities that send their sewage to St. Pete for treatment will also work to improve their systems.

The problem in St. Petersburg, he said, is not capacity. The city has enough capacity to handle all the sewage it treats. The problem is an incursion and rain problem. When heavy rains get into the system, he said, that overburdens the system and causes the overflows.

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St. Pete City Council orders outside audit of sewer report

Rick-KrisemanSt. Petersburg City Council members voted Thursday unanimously to call in outside auditors to find out why a 2014 sewer report was never given to the mayor or council.

It’s also likely that the committee will bring in an outside consultant to evaluate the management of the city’s water resources department. The item will be on an upcoming agenda of a council committee. It’s likely the consultant will also be asked to widen the evaluation to include both the sanitation and information technology departments.

The decision came after a couple of weeks of battering for a 151 million gallon sewage spill into Tampa Bay and surrounding waters. Between 35 and 40 residents had sewage back up into their homes.

The wastewater discharge was caused by a sewer system overburdened by rains from a tropical storm that passed offshore. The storm, which later became Hurricane Hermine, dumped heavy rain on Pinellas County.

Mayor Rick Kriseman has blamed the system overflow in part on a worn infrastructure that allowed rainwater to infiltrate pipes and overwhelm the system.

Another component to the problem was the April 2015 closure of the Albert Whitted sewer plant. Wastewater from the plant was diverted to the nearby Southwest plant, which is slated for expansion. Kriseman has said officials’ belief that the Southwest plant could handle the overflow was based on conclusions in consultants’ studies.

A 2014 report, however, said the city would risk an overflow if Albert Whitted were closed before Southwest was expanded. Kriseman and council members said they never received that report. It’s that report that the council wants traced to find out what happened and why members weren’t told of its conclusions.

Kriseman on Wednesday put two midlevel directors on unpaid leave, saying the water resources department “had weak leadership” who had “a degree of disregard for decision makers.”

Kriseman told council members he also intends to hire a public information officer whose sole job would be to keep people informed of happenings in the water resources department. That would include the progress of repairs and improvements to the system and communications about problems in the system whether those arise from storms or other causes.

The council agreed with Kriseman that, once work begins on the expansion of the Southwest plant and other improvements, workers would be on site seven days a week and be able to work double shifts. The goal is to have the system ready for the 2018 storm season to help avoid a future overflow.

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