Tom Lee Archives - SaintPetersBlog

Hillsborough County Legislative Delegation meeting set for December 16

With Tallahassee a four-hour drive away, the annual meeting of the Hillsborough County Legislative Delegation to be held in two weeks in Tampa could very possibly be the only time local residents can address their state representative(s).

That meeting will take place on Friday, December 16 at the Tampa Bay History Center, 801 Old Water Street, from 9 a.m. to 3.p.m.

The Delegation consists of 13 members of the Florida Senate and Florida House of Representatives that represent all or parts of Hillsborough County. Senators Dana Young, Bill Galvano, Darryl Rouson will join Brandon area state Senator Tom Lee , who serves this year as the current Chair of the Delegation.

House members include Jake Raburn, Dan Raulerson, Sean Shaw, Shawn Harrison, Ross Spano, Jackie Toledo, Janet Cruz, Jamie Grant and Wengay Newton.

The annual meeting is an opportunity for the general public to interact with and voice any concerns or opinions to their elected officials prior to the start of the 2017 Legislative Session. It’s also when lawmakers will propose so-called “local bills”

Public testimony will be limited to three minutes per speaker. The deadline to submit a request to speak is 5 p.m. on Friday, December 9, which you can access from this page. Additional speaker request forms will be available at the meeting.

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Dana Young named to chair Health Care policy committee in Florida Senate

Dana Young has been named as chair of Health Care policy in the Florida state Senate. The South Tampa Republican, who was elected to the Legislature’s upper chamber earlier this month in SD 18, will also serve as Vice Chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Higher Education

Senate President Joe Negron handed out such assignments to his charges in the Senate on Tuesday for the 2017 and 2018 sessions.

Other Hillsborough County area senators who learned that they would chair committees include Bill Galvano, who will chair the Appropriations Subcommittee on Higher Education

Senator Galvano previously served as Majority Leader to the Florida Senate during the 2014-2016 legislative term, and has also served as the Chair of Education Appropriations in the past. He represents District 21, which encompasses all of Manatee County, as well as a portion of Hillsborough County.

“I appreciate the confidence President Negron has placed in me by appointing me Chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Higher Education,” said Galvano.  “I look forward to delivering a higher education budget that truly meets the needs of the people of Florida; a budget that will elevate our university system to the highest level of excellence.”

Darryl Rouson, who narrowly defeated fellow Democrat Ed Narain in the Tampa/St. Pete District SD 19 race, will serve as Vice Chair of the Transportation Committee.

And Brandon’s Tom Lee heads Community Affairs.

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Tom Lee files constitutional amendment on property taxes

State Sen. Tom Lee has filed a proposed constitutional amendment to keep “dramatic increases in annual property tax assessments” in check on vacation homes and other properties.

Lee, a Brandon Republican, filed SJR 76 on Monday.

“Failure to pass this joint resolution will result in one of the largest tax increases in the history of our state,” Lee said in a statement. “Florida voters will have the ultimate say on the 2018 ballot, but it is the legislature’s responsibility to act in a timely manner so these important provisions don’t expire.”

The amendment, which would apply to Section 27 of Article XII of the State Constitution, would protect limits now in place on annual tax hikes.

Florida voters amended the constitution in 2008 to give property owners some protection, according to a statement from Lee’s office.

“The amendment, set to expire in 2019, currently prohibits the assessment of certain non-homestead property, including second homes, rental properties, vacation homes, vacant land or commercial property, from increasing by more than 10 percent per year,” it said.

“Sen. Lee’s resolution would extend this provision indefinitely.” Property owners affected by this provision in 2016 will save a total of $776 million, he said.

“This amendment has done its job in keeping annual tax increases modest for Floridians, and anything less than that is unacceptable,” Lee added.

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Final round-up of the money chase in Tampa Bay’s legislative races

On Friday, candidates released their final campaign finance reports before Election Day, and reports out of Senate District 18 show Tampa Republican Rep. Dana Young pressing her fundraising advantage in the race with $1.2 million in spending.

Young spent more than $500,000 of campaign’s war chest in between Oct. 22 and Nov. 3, most of it heading to a media buy with Mentzer Media Services.

The exiting House Majority Leader also raised $67,000 for her SD 18 campaign, leaving her with about $113,000 on hand in her campaign account heading into the final few days of the election cycle.

Her political committee, “Friends of Dana Young,” spent even more money, with $700,000 heading to the Florida Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee chaired by incoming Senate President Joe Negron. Young’s PAC had about $200,000 on hand Nov. 3.

Young is running against Democratic attorney Bob Buesing and a pair of NPA candidates for the Tampa-based seat, but none of her opponents have come close to competing in the money race.

Despite raising another $76,000 in contributions and putting another $35,000 of his own money into the race during the two-week reporting period, Buesing’s total fundraising is less than a quarter of what Young has been able to pull in through her campaign and committee accounts.

Buesing’s $111,000 performance was coupled with $119,000 in spending, mainly on media buys through Chicago-based AL Media. His campaign had about $53,000 in the bank heading into the final five days.

Joe Redner, the better funded of SD 18’s two NPA candidates, didn’t post any contributions during the period, though he did spend $35,000 on media. Fellow NPA candidate Sheldon Upthegrove also laid an egg in his report and showed a $100 account balance Nov. 3.

The other five Senate seats covering Hillsborough or Pinellas counties are pretty much decided, with Sens. Tom Lee, Bill Galvano and Jeff Brandes all winning re-election unopposed, and Clearwater Republican Sen. Jack Latvala only facing a write-in candidate.

The SD 19 race between Democratic Rep. Darryl Rouson and Republican John “Mr. Manners” Houman is also looking like a runaway.

Rouson raised another $41,000 during the reporting period and spent $23,000, leaving him with about $85,000 in the bank for the final stretch. Houman, best known for his nontraditional campaign website, added $0 during the period and has about $60 in the bank.

In the House, Republican Reps. Jake Raburn, Janet Cruz, and Jamie Grant have secured victory, and Sean Shaw is already on the list for the freshman class. Also expect to see Chris Latvala, Chris Sprowls, and Larry Ahern hang on to their seats with little fanfare.

In HD 63, Republican Rep. Shawn Harrison brought in about $46,000 and was outraised by Democrat Lisa Monelione, who added $55,500 to her campaign coffers.

Harrison still has the cash on hand lead with about $38,000 in the bank compared to about $10,000 for Montelione, though a money lead may not be enough to keep him in the swing seat come Tuesday.

South Pasadena Republican Rep. Kathleen Peters is also facing a decently funded Democrat, Jennifer Webb, though she out-raised her 3-to-1 in her new report.

Peters added about $61,500 and spent about $100,500, mainly on a TV buy, leaving her with about $113,000 in the bank. Webb took in another $21,000 and spent about $19,000, leaving her with about $13,000 on hand.

Republican HD 59 Rep. Ross Spano also outraised his opponent, Democratic attorney Rena Frazier, with $26,600 in contributions compared to her $13,500 haul. Both candidates spent nearly $60,000 during the reporting period, and Nov. 3 Spano had about $66,000 in the bank compared to $31,000 for Frazier.

 In HD 60, Republican Jackie Toledo crossed the $300,000 mark in total fundraising after bringing in another $38,000. Toledo, who is running to replace Young, spent $55,600 and had about $73,000 in the bank Nov. 3.

Her opponent, Democrat David Singer, raised about $8,800 and spent $8,300 leaving him with just $5,000 in the bank for the final stretch. At $161,00, his total fundraising is about half of Toledo’s.

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Here’s where the money chase stands in Tampa Bay’s legislative races

Tampa Bay legislative candidates have filed their second-to-last campaign finance reports before Election Day, and Republicans still look like they’ll hold onto five of the six Senate seats covering Hillsborough or Pinellas counties.

Sens. Tom Lee, Bill Galvano, and Jeff Brandes have already been re-elected without opposition, while Clearwater Republican Sen. Jack Latvala only faces a write-in candidate.

Democratic Rep. Darryl Rouson faces Republican John “Mr. Manners” Houman in the SD 19 race, though he has been piling on to his campaign finance lead in the left-leaning district.

Rouson added $48,400 between Oct. 15 and Oct. 21, and has about $65,000 in the bank compared to Houman, who had less than $100 on hand after raising $0 in his new report.

SD 18 is a little more competitive, though Republican Rep. Dana Young still has a firm lead over Democratic attorney Bob Buesing.

The Tampa Republican added another $23,200 in campaign contributions and has more than $570,000 in the bank. Her committee, “Friends of Dana Young,” didn’t add anything during the week-long reporting period, but it is sitting comfortably with about $860,000 on hand.

Buesing was able to tack on another $27,855, but his war chest was sitting at about $63,000 on Oct. 21.

No-party candidate Joe Redner put $60,000 of his own money into his campaign on Oct. 18, making him the top SD 18 fundraiser during the reporting period, though his campaign is in the negative. Fellow no-party candidate Sheldon Upthegrove posted $0 in his report, and sits with about $500 in his campaign account.

In the House, Republican Reps. Jake Raburn, Janet Cruz, and Jamie Grant were re-elected, and Democrat Sean Shaw is already on the list for the freshman class. Republican Reps. Chris Latvala, Chris Sprowls, and Larry Ahern also should hang on to their seats with minimal opposition.

Republican Rep. Shawn Harrison, who is in his second “first term” as the HD 63 representative, is still in a tough battle with Democrat Lisa Montelione.

He both out-raised and outspent Montelione in the new report, with about $18,000 coming in and $60,000 heading out.

Montelione, who was able to raise $24,000 in her previous report, raised just $6,739 and spent just $127 between Oct. 15 and Oct. 21.

Republican Rep. Kathleen Peters also is facing a decently funded challenger in the HD 69 race, though she managed to pull in $24,000 to Democrat Jennifer Webb’s $7,265 in their new reports.

Peters’ total fundraising hit $370,000 on Oct. 21 and she still had about $152,000 of that money on hand. Webb has raised about $138,000 so far and has just over $10,000 in the bank.

Republican Rep. Ross Spano was also able to put a little more space between himself and Democratic challenger Rena Frazier in the HD 59 race.

The incumbent Republican pulled in $27,580 compared to Frazier’s $12,031. His total fundraising is now just shy of $350,000 and he has about $95,000 in the bank, while Frazier has raised a total of about $185,000 and has about $77,000 on hand.

Democrat Ben Diamond once again out-raised and outspent Republican Joseph Bensmihen in the race to take over for exiting Rep. Dwight Dudley in HD 68.

Diamond added another $14,000 and spent $10,000, leaving him with less than $15,000 on hand after raising more than $366,000 this cycle. Bensmihen raised just $250 and spent $7,361, for an on-hand total of less than $1,000 on Oct. 21.

Republican Jackie Toledo also came out on top against Democrat David Singer in the race to replace Young in HD 60.

Toledo raised $24,200 and had more than $90,000 on hand on Oct. 21, while Singer brought in just $5,360 and had about $4,000 in the bank.

The seat leans toward Republicans, and with the financial advantage Toledo has built up, she is likely to hold Young’s seat for the GOP.

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Here’s where sh*t stands in Tampa Bay’s legislative races

With two weeks to go until Election Day, the Tampa Bay area’s Senate seats are pretty much decided. Welcome back Sens. Jack Latvala and Tom Lee and say hello to Darryl Rouson, who should cruise past John “Mr. Manners” Houman to win the SD 19 seat.

Tampa Republican Rep. Dana Young still has a race ahead of her for the SD 18 seat, however.

Young is running against Democrat Bob Buesing and a pair of high-polling, no-party candidates for the Hillsborough County seat, and has maintained a major fundraising advantage throughout the contest.

As of Oct. 14, the veteran lawmaker had more than $585,000 on hand in her campaign account and another $1 million in her political committee, “Friends of Dana Young.”

Buesing picked up $20,000 from Oct. 8 through Oct. 14, though he only has about $40,000 in the bank, while NPA candidates Joe Redner and Sheldon Upthegrove hovered near the $0 mark.

Young’s only threat in this race is the district’s leanings — it voted narrowly for President Barack Obama four years ago.

In the House, Republican Reps. Jake Raburn, Janet Cruz, and Jamie Grant have secured victory, and Sean Shaw is already on the list for the freshman class. Also expect to see Chris Latvala, Chris Sprowls, and Larry Ahern hang on to their seats with little fanfare.

Many incumbents are still in election mode, though.

Republican Rep. Shawn Harrison is facing Democrat Lisa Montelione in the HD 63 race, which could be tough for Harrison despite his solid fundraising advantage, given the district’s history of flipping parties every two years.

After adding $22,500 in contributions during the last reporting period, Harrison had about $60,000 in the bank compared to $23,000 for Montelione, who added $24,000 between Oct. 8 and Oct. 14.

In HD 69, incumbent Republican Rep. Kathleen Peters is facing a moderate challenge from Democrat Jennifer Webb, who has raised a total of $131,000 so far.

Peters is still far in the lead in fundraising with nearly $350,000 raised and about $135,000 on hand compared to about $6,000 for Webb. The vote could be tight in the Pinellas County district, though.

Back in 2012, Peters won the seat by four points against Democrat Josh Shulman, while that margin exploded to 16 points in the midterm contest against Scott Orsini.

Republican Rep. Ross Spano is also faces a well-funded opponent for the HD 59 seat, but like most other bay area Republicans, he’s managed to keep the lead in the money race.

Spano added $22,500 in contributions during the reporting period for a total of $318,000 raised, with $126,000 of that money on hand. Democratic attorney Rena Frasier added just $5,565 for the week and spent more than $50,000 on campaign communications, leaving her with about $65,000 in the bank.

Republicans hold a slight edge in HD 59, which came through for Spano four years ago when he won a nail-biter against Democrat Gail Gottlieb by about one point.

In HD 68, Democrat Ben Diamond has a slight cash-on-hand lead over Republican Joseph Bensmihen in the race to take over for exiting Democrat Dwight Dudley. Diamond’s total fundraising of $350,000 is nearly 10-fold higher than the competition and this seat is likely his for the taking.

The HD 60 race is playing out similarly, with Republican Jackie Toledo bringing in $29,250 during the reporting period for an on-hand total of about $69,000. Her competition, Democrat David Singer, added $11,360 for the week and has about $33,000 in the bank.

HD 60 has the potential to be somewhat competitive, though the district tends to break towards Republicans as evidenced by current HD 60 Rep. Dana Young’s easy elections to the coastal Tampa seat.

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Lawmakers get grim budget news for next year

Florida is likely to basically break even next year in terms of its state budget, lawmakers heard Monday.

The Joint Legislative Budget Commission met in the Capitol to hear the latest financial outlook for 2017-18: Present income and outgo estimates leave Florida with a relatively scanty $7.5 million left over out of about $32.2 billion in available revenue.

The current year’s budget is roughly $82 billion, for example, after Gov. Rick Scott vetoed a total of $256 million in spending. Roughly two-thirds of the yearly budget goes toward health care and education.

After the meeting, Republican lawmakers stressed that the state didn’t have a revenue shortage, it had a spending problem, painting a picture of government profligacy.

But, since the GOP has controlled the Legislature for nearly two decades, it’s a picture they’re prominently featured in.

House Speaker-designate Richard Corcoran said education and health care spending isn’t to immune to cuts next year.

“If you’re asking me, do I think we are misspending or wasting money, or not getting an efficient return from money that spend on 70 percent of our budget, the answer is yes,” he said. “Every single government person comes up here and spends money like a teenager in the mall for the first time with a credit card. We’ve got to start cutting up the credit card.”

But first on the chopping block, Corcoran suggested, was Enterprise Florida (EFI), the state’s public-private economic development organization. It got $23.5 million for operations, marketing and other initiatives in the 2016-17 state budget.

“Spending money on economic development is a bad idea,” the Land O’ Lakes Republican said. Lawmakers this year did reject Scott’s request for a $250 million incentives fund to be administered by Enterprise Florida.

When asked whether the organization needed to be dissolved, he said: “I think that’s definitely a discussion that’s going to take place this coming session.

“But you have to understand, over the last umpteen (years), EFI has been in the acquisition of power,” he quickly added. “There’s lots that has been put into EFI that doesn’t belong in EFI that probably still has a function that the state would want to keep.”

“Enterprise Florida is committed to ensuring every Floridian has access to a quality job,” spokesman Mike Grissom said in an email. “We will continue to work until we have accomplished that goal.”

Corcoran, who was House Appropriations chair the last two sessions, said “unequivocally, there are tons of things in the budget that need to be cut, should be cut and will be cut.” He didn’t offer specific proposals.

State Sen. Tom Lee, the Brandon Republican who chaired the Senate Appropriations committee, cautioned that the numbers were preliminary and could change.

Chief legislative economist Amy Baker, however, earlier told the panel the current forecast “could be the good news” and later outlooks “may not be this good.”

“It’s very clear … that spending levels in this legislature are just not sustainable,” said Lee, who will be succeeded as Senate budget chief by Jack Latvala, a Clearwater Republican.

“We are, by every economic metric, growing and growing very well … unemployment is down, there’s wage growth, sales tax is up … we’re just struggling to balance our spending with those revenue streams,” Lee said.

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War of words heats up between Ed Narain and Augie Ribeiro in SD 19 race

Ever since Augie Ribeiro entered the state Senate District 19 race in late June, Ed Narain has seemed to be personally offended by his campaign theme that he’s a Democrat “for all of us.”

“Is he implying that the people that have held the seat before didn’t represent everybody in the district?” Narain asked on Monday night while attending the Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce’s “Hob Nob” at the Hyatt Hotel in Tampa. “He’s the one who’s playing divisive politics, and I’m going to take a stand against that in this race.”

Narain has the backing of much of the party’s establishment in the contest, which also features former state Representative Betty Reed and outgoing House District 70 Representative Darryl Rouson. He had been the most prolific fundraiser in the race but has subsequently watched as Ribeiro has poured hundreds of thousands of his own cash into his campaign — money that Narain derides as not being homegrown.

“Ninety-five percent of the money that Augie Ribeiro has raised in this race is from Connecticut, New York City and the Northeast,” he says. “This is a guy who’s pretending to be on the side of the people, that is basically is trying to buy his way into the Florida Senate. He is not an attorney. He is nothing more than a fraud.”

Ribeiro says he is a practicing attorney, but doesn’t solicit business or practice in Florida.

“I have spent my entire career as a civil justice lawyer standing up and fighting for hardworking middle-class families, minorities and those injured by the careless acts of others,” he says. “I currently work on mostly federal consumer protection cases, including claims against Big Pharma, BP and General Motors. I am committed to bringing my skills to Tallahassee to take on the kinds of entities that have taken advantage of the people in this district.”

Ribeiro, like Narain, was born in New York City, but most of the similarities end there. Narain moved to Florida when he was 16, and chastises Ribeiro for being a Johnny-come-lately on issues that pertain to Senate District 19, which includes some of the poorest parts of St. Petersburg and Tampa.

Ribeiro has spent much of his adult life living in Danbury, Connecticut, where he made millions of dollars by successfully taking corporations like BP PLC (in the Deepwater Horizon disaster) and General Motors (in the ignition switch defect case). He began visiting St. Petersburg a decade ago when he met his wife, Dr. Sarah Lind, who served as deputy mayor in the Rick Baker administration, but he didn’t move to St. Petersburg full-time until three years ago.

“I believe that the consumers in this district, the people who need it most, need someone who ‘s going to stand up, not take contributions from the insurance companies, the utility companies and the payday loan companies, because those are the companies that the leaders of this district need to regulate the most to protect,” Ribeiro says, adding that “it seems almost unfathomable to me that the leaders would subsidize or be funded by those industries that they have to regulate.”

Ribeiro says he’s outraged that Narain (and Rouson) have relied on so much corporate support for their candidacies, and he says that’s why he’s a better representative for the people of SD 19. His campaign says that Narain has raised more than $21,000 of contributions from utilities, insurance, and payday lenders.

Narain was similarly accused of being too corporate/GOP-friendly two years ago when he ran against Sean Shaw for the House District 59 seat, which he currently occupies. Shaw sent out a flier just a few weeks before 2014 primary that accused Narain of being a “Rick Scott Republican.”

“Yeah, I’m supported by business groups, but I’m also supported by the AFL-CIO, the West Central Florida Labor Council, the Police Benevolent Association — on both the Tampa side and the Pinellas side — we can go down the list: firefighters, FEA, labor and business together,” countered Narain. “I do not believe in divisive politics. It’s the reason why I was successful the last two years in Tallahassee.”

Narain has had some successes while working with the majority GOP House and Senate in his one and only term in office. Working with Brandon Senator Tom Lee, he procured a $1.2 million appropriation to move a Tampa Heights community center that was slated to be razed due to the upcoming construction of the Tampa Bay Express project. He also sponsored legislation to replace and remove the statue of Confederate Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith from the National Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C.

And Narain sponsored legislation that would provide up to $7,500 for funeral and burial expenses for the exhumed bodies at the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna. The school was closed down in 2011 amid accusations by former students of physical and sexual abuse.

On Monday night, the question was posed to Ribeiro — despite his financial largesse, could he break through to the voters in the area by Aug. 30, most of whom didn’t know he existed two months ago?

“After speaking with many local leaders in both Hillsborough and Pinellas, there seemed to be a real undercurrent for a Democrat with true progressive values, and I believe I’m filling that need,” insists Ribeiro. “I believe I was that candidate beforehand, and then in speaking to people and assessing the other candidates, I think that’s where we’re going. The next generation of this community deserves a progressive Democrat, and I believe that by far I surpass the other candidates in my commitment to progressive values.”

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Instant winners aplenty in Florida Senate races

You might want to call them instant winners.

As of 5 p.m. Friday, a dozen Florida Senate candidates appeared to win their elections when the qualifying period ended without them drawing opposition.

Newcomers Lauren Book and George Gainer were among those candidates who did not draw an opponent.

Gainer, a Bay County Republican, ran unopposed in Senate District 2. That race was expected to be hotly contested and deemed one to watch by political observers. But in March, Rep. Matt Gaetz dropped his state Senate bid to run for Congress instead. Gaetz is one of the several Republicans who qualified to run in Florida’s 1st Congressional District.

Book is a well-known South Florida Democrat, having spent years trying to bring awareness to childhood sexual abuse. She is the daughter of lobbyist Ron Book. She is expected to win her bid to represent South Florida in Senate District 32.

Gainer and Lauren Book are the only newcomers who won their races after running unopposed. The remaining candidates all will return to the Senate after they failed to draw an opponent.

Audrey Gibson won re-election in Senate District 6; Perry Thurston won re-election in Senate District 33, and Oscar Braynon won re-election in Senate District 35. Braynon is set to become the Minority Leader in 2016.

On the Republican side, Aaron Bean won re-election in Senate District 4; Rob Bradley won re-election in Senate District 5; David Simmons won re-election in Senate District 9; Wilton Simpson won re-election in Senate District 10; Tom Lee won re-election in Senate District 20; Bill Galvano won re-election in Senate District 21; and Denise Grimsley won re-election in Senate District 26.

Galvano and Simpson are both believed to be in line for the Senate presidency.

Candidates had until noon Friday to qualify to be on the ballot. State elections officials said they expect all of the candidate qualifying information to be finalized by Friday evening.

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Tom Lee, Bill Galvano to remain powerful GOP voices in Senate

Two key Republicans will be returning to the Florida Senate in new districts and without opposition.

Bill Galvano of Bradenton and Tom Lee of Brandon were the only candidates to meet Friday’s noon filing deadline and thus have been assured of returning to Tallahassee.

Lee’s political future had seemed uncertain after court-ordered redistricting could have placed both him and Galvano in the newly drawn District 21, which covers parts of Hillsborough and Manatee counties.

Lee declined to run against Galvano, and after considering a run for the Hillsborough County Commission opted instead to move within the boundaries of the new District 20.

The move keeps two powerful GOP voices in Tallahassee.

Galvano is in line to become Senate President in 2019, provided Republicans keep their majority in that body. Lee served as the chair of the appropriations committee in the last session.

Galvano picked up high-profile help recently when Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam campaigned for him in Wimauma in southern Hillsborough. Galvano has worked closely with Putnam to attack citrus greening, which threatens the livelihood of the state’s citrus farmers.

He was first elected to the state House of Representatives in 2002, and then to the Senate in 2012. He served as Republican majority leader in 2014.

Lee initially was elected to the Senate in 1996 and was re-elected without opposition in 2000. Redistricting forced him to run again two years later, but he was again elected without opposition. In 2004, he served as the Senate president.

After losing a statewide election in 2006 to Alex Sink for chief financial officer, Lee left politics before returning in 2012.

“I just humbly look forward the privilege of serving West Central Florida in the Senate,” Lee said in a statement Friday. “When a public servant does a job between elections, the re-elections tend to take care of themselves.

“I represent everyone in our district, not just those in our party. Without a Facebook or Twitter account, I tend to rely on the old-fashioned way of doing things.”

Lee hopes to close on a piece of property within the boundaries of his new district by early next month.

In campaign filings with the state, Galvano listed his net worth at $2.064 million. Lee listed his net worth at $2.9 million.

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