Americans favor Halloween costumes, candy in school

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Some schools continue to prohibit Halloween costumes and candy, and most Americans still disagree with these policies.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 71% of American Adults believe children should be allowed to wear Halloween costumes in class. This is up from 63% last year. Twenty-one percent disagree.

Sixty-four percent believe public schools also should allow children to bring candy to school for Halloween, basically unchanged from a year ago. Twenty-seven percent disagree. There’s little difference of opinion on both questions between Americans with children living with them and those who don’t have kids in their home.

Just 30% of Americans rate the performance of elementary and secondary schools in America today as good or excellent.

Generally speaking, the older the adult, the less likely they are to support Halloween costumes and candy in schools. Americans tend to favor both costumes and candy in schools or oppose them both. Most adults think school nutrition standards should be set on a local, not a federal level.

Most Americans say a ban on the sale of large sugary drinks would have no impact on public health.

Voters support parents having the choice of sending their kids to schools depending on a school’s policy on uniforms, prayer and if the school operates on a traditional school year.

Fifty-two percent of Americans believe there is not enough religion in the public schools.

Peter Schorsch is the President of Extensive Enterprises and is the publisher of some of Florida’s most influential new media websites, including SaintPetersBlog.com, FloridaPolitics.com, ContextFlorida.com, and Sunburn, the morning read of what’s hot in Florida politics. SaintPetersBlog has for three years running been ranked by the Washington Post as the best state-based blog in Florida. In addition to his publishing efforts, Peter is a political consultant to several of the state’s largest governmental affairs and public relations firms. Peter lives in St. Petersburg with his wife, Michelle, and their daughter, Ella.