Helpful chart details how much is being spent on behalf of each presidential candidate

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ABC News reports that the stream of media buys from super PACs in South Carolina is more than double what the Republican primary candidates have spent so far.

“The super PACs, which are allowed to raise unlimited sums but cannot coordinate with candidates, have spent over $7 million so far in the Palmetto State compared to all of the presidential contenders, who have spent a combined total of $3.2 million.”

Alex Altman zooms in on the robust activities of Romney’s SuperPac:

Once it started buying ads, Restore Our Future never stopped. The $153,017 it spent that first week increased to $1.04 million the next, where it stayed relatively level until the week of Jan. 2, when the race shifted to New Hampshire. Romney’s support in the Granite State required less reinforcement, so Restore Our Future’s spending plummeted to $583,299 the week before the New Hampshire primary, before ratcheting back up to $2.1 million the following week. Even more ads — at least $2.58 million worth — will run next week, the last before the Jan. 21 South Carolina primary, where Romney hopes to all but sew up the nomination.

Stephen Colbert’s super PAC, Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow, now under the leadership of Jon Stewart, has started buying airtime in the South Carolina media market, according to ABC News.

The super PAC has made already purchased nearly $10,000 worth of time on a broadcast station in the Charleston, S.C. area between Jan. 15 and Jan. 19 and is reportedly in negotiations for a “substantial media buy” in the Columbia market.

Peter Schorsch is the President of Extensive Enterprises and is the publisher of some of Florida’s most influential new media websites, including SaintPetersBlog.com, FloridaPolitics.com, ContextFlorida.com, and Sunburn, the morning read of what’s hot in Florida politics. SaintPetersBlog has for three years running been ranked by the Washington Post as the best state-based blog in Florida. In addition to his publishing efforts, Peter is a political consultant to several of the state’s largest governmental affairs and public relations firms. Peter lives in St. Petersburg with his wife, Michelle, and their daughter, Ella.