New app lets you put your money where your politics is

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Many readers of this blog live and breathe politics. And now, thanks to a new app, you can eat and purchase and decorate your home that way, too. Or, if you were already disgruntled with how polarized society has become and want to complain about yet another example of politics-infecting-what-is-otherwise-neutral-ground… this app will enable you to do that too.

It’s called “BuyPartisan” and offers consumers data on the political orientations and contributions of corporations. The app developer, Matthew Colbert, figured that partisans would want to know that some portion of their Campbell’s soup or Kellogg’s cereal budget may be going to support political foes.

Diehard Democrats and Republicans can now shop the aisles scanning barcodes of products to see whether the parent company is aligned with their views. For many companies, the app shows you what percent of contributions went to each party, where its employees fall on the political spectrum, and where its board of directors do, too.

And if you choose to use this political tool yourself, be prepared for some surprises. For example, Eden Foods — the purveyor of organic, macrobiotic and GMO-free foods that began as a co-op — is a staple for progressives, and markets itself as such. But the company also supported Hobby Lobby in the call to end Obamacare’s contraception mandate.

BuyPartisan uses data from the Center for Responsive Politics, the Sunlight Foundation and the Institute for State Money in Politics, and is intended to “make every day Election Day” through “conscious” spending.

Peter Schorsch is the President of Extensive Enterprises and is the publisher of some of Florida’s most influential new media websites, including SaintPetersBlog.com, FloridaPolitics.com, ContextFlorida.com, and Sunburn, the morning read of what’s hot in Florida politics. SaintPetersBlog has for three years running been ranked by the Washington Post as the best state-based blog in Florida. In addition to his publishing efforts, Peter is a political consultant to several of the state’s largest governmental affairs and public relations firms. Peter lives in St. Petersburg with his wife, Michelle, and their daughter, Ella.