The limits of political reporting

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There’s a great moment in Dan Senor’s interview on Morning Joe from Wednesday, where Senor attempts to explain why the Romney team, to which he was a top adviser, thought it was going to win. Specifically, Senor is claiming that the delusion on Election Day that the race was a “toss-up” was not merely the product of the Right’s fever dream:

Reporters across the political spectrum, pundits across the political divide, believed this race was too close to call.

This is pretty much right. But what Senor neglects to mention is the reporters and pundits who he’s highlighting spend most of their time talking to people like Senor, whose very job was to convince reporters that the race was indeed “too close to call.”
This is the problem with “Republicans say this, but Democrats say this” reporting which proceeds as though there can be no discernible truth. Watch the whole episode. Senor notes (and I don’t doubt it) that some of the same GOP governors who are blasting Romney were jockeying backstage, five days before, for appointment in a Romney cabinet.
Via The Atlantic.

Peter Schorsch is the President of Extensive Enterprises and is the publisher of some of Florida’s most influential new media websites, including SaintPetersBlog.com, FloridaPolitics.com, ContextFlorida.com, and Sunburn, the morning read of what’s hot in Florida politics. SaintPetersBlog has for three years running been ranked by the Washington Post as the best state-based blog in Florida. In addition to his publishing efforts, Peter is a political consultant to several of the state’s largest governmental affairs and public relations firms. Peter lives in St. Petersburg with his wife, Michelle, and their daughter, Ella.