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Associated Press

Twitter leader says he’s ‘sorry’ for social media role in Donald Trump’s election

A co-founder of Twitter says he’s sorry if the popular social media platform helped put Donald Trump in the White House, as the president has suggested.

In an interview with The New York Times, Evan Williams says Twitter’s role in Trump’s populist rise is “a very bad thing.”

The president has credited Twitter with his election to the highest office in the land.

When confronted with that notion, Williams said: “If it’s true that he wouldn’t be president if it weren’t for Twitter, then yeah, I’m sorry.”

The 45-year-old Silicon Valley entrepreneur also said the internet is obviously broken because it rewards extremes.

Williams also says he was wrong thinking that the world would be a better place if there was a platform for everyone to freely speak and exchange ideas.

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

Justices rejects Florida appeal over death penalty

The Supreme Court has left in place a lower court ruling that said imposing a death sentence in Florida requires a unanimous jury.

The justices on Monday turned away an appeal from Florida officials seeking to overturn the ruling last year from the state’s highest court.

The Florida Supreme Court had struck down a newly enacted law allowing a defendant to be sentenced to death as long as 10 out of 12 jurors recommend it. That ruling concluded that Timothy Lee Hurst — convicted of a 1998 murder at a Pensacola Popeye’s restaurant— deserves a new sentencing hearing.

Last year, the U.S. Supreme Court declared Florida’s death penalty sentencing law unconstitutional. State legislators responded by overhauling the law.

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

Yanks avoid sweep with 3-2 win over Rays

Yankees manager Joe Girardi couldn’t help but smile when talking about 5-foot-11 Brett Gardner going deep again and 6-foot-7 Aaron Judge making an unbelievable diving catch.

Gardner hit his eighth home run, one more than this 2016 total, and CC Sabathia won consecutive starts for the first time in nearly a year to help New York beat the Tampa Bay Rays 3-2 Sunday and avoid a three-game sweep.

Didi Gregorius had an RBI single in the second for the second of his four hits and Gardner followed with his drive to right. All of Gardner’s home runs have come in a 20-game span starting April 19.

“It sounds a little crazy, but last year I was really inconsistent and just not at my best,” Gardner said. “The first three or four weeks this season I wasn’t any good, either. Here recently I’ve been swinging the bat better.”

Judge made a full extension diving backhand catch on the right field warning track in the sixth to rob Evan Longoria of a tying extra-base hit, starting a double play that doubled up Corey Dickerson at first.

“Obviously, one of the biggest plays for us this year,” Sabathia said.

Judge said he had a good read on the ball off the bat.

“Saw I might have a chance, and just dove for it,” he added.

Sabathia (4-2), coming off a win at Kansas City, allowed two runs and four hits in five-plus innings. He had not won back-to-back starts since June 10 against Detroit and six days later at Minnesota.

Tyler Clippard stranded Kevin Kiermaier at third in the seventh when he relieved Chad Green and retired Logan Morrison on a flyout on the 11th pitch of an at-bat. Dellin Betances got four outs — three on strikeouts — for his second save.

Chris Archer (3-3) struck out a season-high 12, including Judge and Matt Holliday three times each. He gave up three runs and six hits in 6 1/3 innings.

“The play that Judge made was really the difference-maker,” Archer said.

Judge struck out four times overall and the Yankees fanned 17 times, which tied the team record for a nine-inning game. Still, New York won for just the fourth time in 11 games.

Dickerson scored from second in the first inning when catcher Gary Sanchez was charged with an error for an errant throw attempting to pick off Longoria at first base.

Derek Norris hit a solo homer in the fifth.

There was no carry over from Saturday’s game that had three hit batters and three ejections.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Yankees: 1B Greg Bird (bruised right ankle) could hit off a tee and take soft toss Monday. … Girardi said closer Aroldis Chapman (left shoulder rotator cuff inflammation) feels good and will be re-evaluated Monday to determine when the lefty can start a throwing program. … Girardi had an ice pack on his right knee after the game. He had meniscus surgery on it Monday.

STRANGE POSTPONEMENT

Charlotte, the Rays’ Florida State League affiliate, had its game Saturday against Jupiter postponed in the fourth inning when the protective netting behind the plate fell. The teams played a doubleheader on a back field Sunday at the complex in Port Charlotte, where the host Stone Crabs had a photo on their Twitter site showing complimentary hot dogs and burgers on a portable grill.

Rays: RHP Jake Odorizzi (3-2) and Los Angeles Angels RHP J.C. Ramirez (3-3) are Monday night’s starters. Angels OF Mike Trout is a .362 hitter in 13 games at Tropicana Field.

Republished with permission from the Associated Press.

Homers, hit batters, ejections define Rays’ win over Yanks

Corey Dickerson homered twice and the Tampa Bay Rays won their season-high fourth in a row, beating the New York Yankees 9-5 Saturday in a game that included three hit batters, three ejections and one animated argument.

Yankees rookie Aaron Judge hit his 15th home run, most in the majors. He also doubled and has a career-best eight-game hitting streak.

New York manager Joe Girardi used his hands to cover the plate with dirt after being tossed by umpire Scott Barry in the fifth inning. That came right after pitching coach Larry Rothschild was ejected by Barry during a mound visit.

Rays starter Matt Andriese hit Matt Holliday after giving up a home run to Gary Sanchez in the fifth. In the bottom half, Yankees reliever Tommy Layne plunked Dickerson, who had hit two home runs off Masahiro Tanaka.

Andriese (4-1) hit Judge with a pitch leading off the sixth and was thrown out. The 6-foot-7 Judge dropped his bat and calmly went to first base after being struck.

Tanaka (5-3) struggled for the second consecutive start, allowing six runs and nine hits, including three homers, in three-plus innings. The Yankees ace gave up a career-high eight runs and career high-tying four homers over 1 2/3 innings in a 10-7 loss last Sunday to Houston.

Dickerson hit a leadoff homer in the first and a three-run drive in the fourth. Evan Longoria also homered for the Rays and Logan Morrison had a two-run single during a three-run fifth that made it 9-4.

After Morrison’s single, Rothschild went to the mound and was tossed.

Chase Headley drove in three runs for the Yankees, who lost for the seventh time in 10 games. They had been 12-0 when Judge homered.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Yankees: Sanchez was back in the lineup after sitting out Friday with a stiff neck. He stayed in Saturday’s game after being struck on the mask by Daniel Robertson‘s foul ball in the sixth.

Rays: SS Matt Duffy (Achilles’ tendon surgery), who had his rehab assignment at Class A Charlotte shut down last Sunday after three games because of foot soreness, took batting practice against RHP Tommy Hunter and could resume running Monday. … Hunter (right calf strain) threw 27 pitches but has not started fielding drills.

UP NEXT

Yankees LHP CC Sabathia (3-2), coming off 6 2/3 scoreless innings in a 7-1 win over Kansas City Tuesday, faces Rays RHP Chris Archer (3-2) Sunday. Archer struggled his last time out, giving up seven runs and career-high six walks in an 8-7 loss Monday at Cleveland.

Republished with permission from the Associated Press.

Rested and ready: 13-1 shot Cloud Computing wins Preakness

Sometimes it pays to have a fresh horse.

Cloud Computing skipped the Kentucky Derby, while eventual winner Always Dreaming and Classic Empire mixed it up in the mud at Churchill Downs.

Two weeks later, Cloud Computing pounced on those two horses in the Preakness, pulling off an upset victory at 13-1 odds Saturday. He became the first horse to skip the Derby and win the second leg of the Triple Crown since filly Rachel Alexandra in 2009.

“Some of the reason that we won today was because we were patient and didn’t throw an inexperienced horse against a 20-horse field in the Derby on a very difficult track,” winning co-owner Seth Klarman said. “We made a great call.”

Always Dreaming and Classic Empire dueled for most of the race before Classic Empire stuck his nose in front midway on the far turn. It looked as if Classic Empire would go on to win, but Cloud Computing ran him down on the outside.

Always Dreaming faded to eighth in the 10-horse field on a cool and cloudy day at Pimlico. The crowd of 140,327 and wagering total of $94,127,434 were records, bettering the marks set last year.

Ridden by Javier Castellano, Cloud Computing ran 1 3/16 miles in 1:55.98 and paid $28.80, $8.60 and $6. It was just the dark brown colt’s fourth career start, the fewest of any horse in the race, and only his second win. He didn’t run as a 2-year-old because of injury.

Classic Empire returned $4.40 and $4, and 31-1 shot Senior Investment was another 4 3/4 lengths back in third and paid $10.20.

New York-based trainer Chad Brown earned his first victory in a Triple Crown race. Castellano won for the second time. He rode Bernardini to victory in the 2006 Preakness.

Castellano comes from a racing family, with a father, uncle and brother who have been jockeys.

“We’ve been working for a long time for this moment,” he said. “It’s great for the family.”

The 142nd Preakness had been billed as a match race between Always Dreaming and Classic Empire, and it was from the start.

They broke out of the starting gate next to each other and the fight was on. Always Dreaming took a slight lead with Classic Empire on his flank.

Meanwhile, Cloud Computing was back in third as Castellano watched the duel unfold in front of him.

Always Dreaming was the first to throw in the towel, surrendering the lead to Classic Empire midway around the final turn.

“We didn’t have an excuse,” said Todd Pletcher, who trains Always Dreaming. “We were in a position we expected to be, and I think the turnaround was a little too quick. He ran so hard in the Derby and today just wasn’t his day.”

Always Dreaming lost for the first time in five races this year. He’d won his first four by a combined 23 1/4 lengths.

Classic Empire and Julien Leparoux went into the stretch with three-length lead, seemingly on his way to the winner’s circle.

At that point, trainer Mark Casse thought he was headed there, too.

“Of course,” he said. “But I thought I was going to win a lot of times before, so it doesn’t shock me.”

But Classic Empire also paid a price for putting away Always Dreaming. Classic Empire fought on to the finish line, but couldn’t hold off a fresh horse in Cloud Computing.

“Certainly I’m not going to dispute the fact that I brought in a fresh horse as part of our strategy,” Brown said. “Our horse is very talented, too. Classic Empire and Always Dreaming are two outstanding horses, and our strategy was, if we are ever going to beat them let’s take them on two weeks’ rest when we have six (weeks), and it worked.”

After Cloud Computing ran third in the Wood Memorial, Brown and the owners decided the colt would benefit from skipping the Derby. He came into the Preakness after a six-week break.

“It just didn’t work out in the Wood. We just ran out of time,” Brown said. “We just really zeroed in on this race, and thankfully it worked out.”

The victory was especially sweet for Klarman, who grew up a few blocks from Pimlico. He turns 60 on Sunday. He and William Lawrence have been buying and racing horses together since 2006.

“This is the culmination of 25 years of hard work and learning and trying to figure this game out,” said Klarman, president of the Baupost Group, a hedge fund valued at $31 billion.

“In my regular life, I’m a long-term value investor. This is gambling. It’s really been a thrill and this is the highlight of our career so far as thoroughbred owners.”

Klarman, who races as Klaravich Stables, is a minority owner of the Boston Red Sox.

Lookin At Lee, the Derby runner-up, was fourth. Gunnevera was fifth, followed by Multiplier and Conquest Mo Money. Hence was ninth and Term of Art last.

Republished with permission from the Associated Press.

Fans thankful to see ‘Greatest Show on Earth’ one final time

Lions, tigers and clowns, no more. Oh my. It’s curtains for the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus.

This weekend is the final chance for fans to see death-defying acrobats, exotic animals and flashy costumes as the circus ends its 146-year reign as one of the world’s biggest big tops.

Ringling’s parent company, Feld Entertainment, announced in January that it would take its final bow this year. On Saturday afternoon, under cloudy skies, fans streamed into the Nassau Coliseum in suburban New York to pay their last respects to the iconic show.

“I’m becoming an adult today,” said 46-year-old Heather Greenberg, of New York City. “I can’t go to the circus with my daddy anymore.”

Greenberg and her parents, and her three children, along with her sister and extended family — 12 in all — clowned around, laughing and joking, as they walked into the show.

Her sister, Dawn Mirowitz, 42, of Dix Hills, New York, sobered as she pondered a future without the Ringling Brothers circus.

“We’ll never get a chance to take our grandchildren to the circus,” she said.

Feld executives say declining attendance combined with high operating costs are among reasons for closing.

Ringling had two touring circuses this season, one ending its run earlier this month in Providence, Rhode Island.

The final shows of what was long promoted as “The Greatest Show on Earth” are being staged at the Nassau Coliseum in suburban New York. There are three scheduled shows Saturday and three on Sunday. For those who can’t make it, the final circus show on Sunday night will be streamed live on Facebook Live and on the circus’ website.

Clarissa Williams, a 38-year-old stay-at-home mom from West Hempstead, New York, was taking her 8-year-old daughter, Nylah, to the show.

“I’m thankful we get to see it before it leaves,” she said. “I pray that when they end, they take the animals and put them in a safe, sacred place.”

A spokesman for the circus says homes have been found for the animals that were owned by Ringling, including the tigers, horses and camels.

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

 

Buccaneers sign Ryan Fitzpatrick as Jameis Winston’s backup

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers agreed to terms Friday on a one-year contract with quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick as a veteran backup to Jameis Winston.

Fitzpatrick spent the last two seasons with the New York Jets, who allowed the quarterback’s contract to expire in February, making him a free agent.

The Buccaneers also announced that they waived quarterback Sean Renfree to make room for Fitzpatrick.

Financial terms were not immediately available. ESPN and NFL Network reported that the one-year deal is worth $3 million.

The 34-year-old Fitzpatrick set a Jets franchise record in 2015 with 31 touchdown passes and was re-signed by New York to a one-year, $12 million deal. But he slumped badly as the Jets got off to a 1-5 start. He was benched twice and finished with just 12 TD passes and 17 interceptions.

Because his $10 million bonus was actually prorated over two years to help with the salary cap last year, Fitzpatrick will cost the Jets $5 million in “dead money” on the cap this year.

Fitzpatrick will be entering his 13th NFL season, but has never made the playoffs. He was within a win of reaching the postseason with the Jets in 2015, but threw interceptions in New York’s final three drives in a season-ending loss to Buffalo.

He might have a chance at fulfilling that goal this season, albeit as a backup, with the Buccaneers, who went 9-7 and just missed out on the playoffs last year.

Winston, the first overall pick in the 2015 draft, has started all 32 games in his NFL career and is one of the league’s rising stars with 8,132 yards passing and 50 touchdowns in his first two seasons. But the Buccaneers were in the market for an experienced backup after Mike Glennon signed with Chicago in March.

Fitzpatrick has thrown for 25,888 career yards with 166 touchdowns and 133 INTs and a 79.7 passer rating in stints with the Rams, who drafted him in the seventh round out of Harvard in 2005, Bengals, Bills, Titans, Texans and Jets.

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

In Saudi Arabia, Donald Trump seeks to move past domestic troubles

President Donald Trump arrived in the Middle East on Saturday, touching down in Saudi Arabia to begin his first trip abroad, a visit aimed at forging stronger alliances to combat terrorism while seeking to push past the series of controversies threatening to engulf his young administration.

Trump flew to Riyadh overnight on Air Force One and was welcomed during an elaborate ceremony at the airport, punctuated by a military flyover and a handshake from Saudi King Salman. Trump is the only American president to make Saudi Arabia, or any majority Muslim country, his first stop overseas as president — a scheduling choice designed in part to show respect to the region after more than a year of harsh anti-Muslim campaign rhetoric.

The president’s stop in Saudi Arabia kicks off an ambitious international debut. After two days of meetings in Riyadh, Trump will travel to Israel, have an audience with Pope Francis at the Vatican, and meet with allies at a NATO summit in Brussels and the Group of 7 wealthy nations in Sicily.

As he arrived, the president waved from the doorway of Air Force One and then descended the steps, joined by first lady Melania Trump. The 81-year-old King Salman, who used a cane for support, was brought to the steps of the plane on a golf cart. The two leaders exchanged pleasantries and Trump said it was “a great honor” to be there.

Several jets then flew overhead leaving a red, white and blue trail.

A few hours later, Trump tweeted for the first time on international soil as president, writing “Great to be in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Looking forward to the afternoon and evening ahead.”

White House officials hope the trip gives Trump the opportunity to recalibrate after one of the most difficult stretches of his young presidency. The White House badly bungled the president’s stunning firing of FBI Director James Comey, who was overseeing the federal investigation into possible ties between Trump’s campaign and Russia. On Wednesday, the Justice Department relented to calls from Democrats to name a special counsel, tapping former FBI chief Robert Mueller to lead the probe.

Moments after Trump lifted off for Saudi Arabia, fresh reports stemming from the Russia investigation surfaced and threatened to overshadow the trip. The New York Times reported that Trump called Comey “a real nut job” while discussing the ongoing investigation with two Russian officials visiting the Oval Office earlier this month. He also told them that firing Comey had “taken off” the “great pressure” he was feeling from the investigation, the Times reported.

Meanwhile, The Washington Post reported that an unidentified senior Trump adviser was being considered a “person of interest” in the law enforcement investigation. In addition, Comey agreed to testify at an open hearing of the Senate intelligence committee in the near future, the panel said.

Despite his domestic troubles, Trump was expected to get a warm reception in Saudi Arabia. The kingdom’s ruling family grew deeply frustrated with former President Barack Obama’s detente with Iran and his restrained approach to the conflict in Syria. The king did not greet Obama at the airport during his final visit to the nation last year.

Saudi Arabia offered Trump an elaborate welcome ahead of his two-day stay. Billboards featuring images of Trump and the king dotted the highways of Riyadh, emblazoned with the motto “Together we prevail.” Trump’s luxury hotel was bathed in red, white and blue lights and, at times, an image of the president’s face.

Trump and the king met briefly in the airport terminal for a coffee ceremony before the president headed to his hotel before the day’s other meetings. White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus told reporters on Air Force One that Trump spent the flight meeting with staff, working on his upcoming speech to the Muslim world and getting a little sleep.

Melania Trump wore a black pantsuit with a golden belt and did not cover her head for the arrival, consistent with custom for foreign dignitaries visiting Saudi Arabia. In 2015, her husband had, in a tweet, criticized former first lady Michelle Obama for not wearing a headscarf during a visit to the kingdom.

For a president who campaigned on an “America First” platform, the trip is a crucial moment for U.S. allies to size up his commitment to decades-long partnerships while trying to move behind his previous controversial statements.

“President Trump understands that America First does not mean America alone,” said H.R. McMaster, Trump’s national security adviser. “Prioritizing American interests means strengthening alliances and partnerships that help us extend our influence and improve the security of the American people.”

In a sweetener for Saudi Arabia, U.S. officials said the Trump administration plans to announce $110 billion in advanced military equipment sales and training to the kingdom during the trip. The package includes tanks, combat ships, missile defense systems, radar and communications and cybersecurity technology.

After spending much of Saturday meeting with King Salman and other members of the royal family, Trump was to end the day at a banquet dinner at the Murabba Palace. On Sunday, he’ll hold meetings with more than 50 Arab and Muslim leaders converging on Riyadh for a regional summit focused largely on combating the Islamic State and other extremist groups.

Trump dodged one potential land mine when Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, who has been indicted on war crime and genocide charges, announced that he would not attend the summit for personal reasons.

The centerpiece of Trump’s visit to Saudi Arabia will be a speech Sunday at the Arab-Islamic-American summit. White House aides view the address as a counter to Obama’s 2009 speech to the Muslim world, which Trump criticized as too apologetic for U.S. actions in the region.

Trump will call for unity in the fight against radicalism in the Muslim world, casting the challenge as a “battle between good and evil” and urging Arab leaders to “drive out the terrorists from your places of worship,” according to a draft of the speech obtained by The Associated Press. The draft notably refrains from mentioning democracy and human rights — topics Arab leaders often view as U.S. moralizing — in favor of the more limited goals of peace and stability.

It also abandons some of the harsh anti-Muslim rhetoric that defined Trump’s presidential campaign and does not contain the words “radical Islamic terror,” a phrase Trump repeatedly criticized Hillary Clinton for not using during last year’s campaign.

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

Rays edge Yankees behind Evan Longoria’s 4 hits

Evan Longoria got four hits, including a tiebreaking single in the eighth inning that sent the Tampa Bay Rays over the New York Yankees 5-4 on Friday night.

Longoria began the game in an 0-for-12 rut, but has often done well against the Yankees, totaling 102 RBI in 156 games. His go-ahead hit came with two outs after Tyler Clippard (0-2) walked two and struck out a pair.

Danny Farquhar (2-1) induced an inning-ending double play from Aaron Judge in the eighth before Alex Colome got three outs to pick up his 11th save.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi missed the game to attend the high school graduation of his daughter in south Florida. He will rejoin the team Saturday.

Bench coach Rob Thomson filled in for Girardi for the fourth time. Thomson lost two games against the Rays in April 2008 when Girardi had an upper respiratory infection, and beat Baltimore a month later while the manager served a one-game suspension.

The Rays trailed 2-1 in the seventh when they loaded the bases with no outs off Adam Warren, who then allowed Logan Morrison‘s sacrifice fly.

Chasen Shreve entered with two outs and gave up Rickie Weeks‘ two-run double that third baseman Ronald Torreyes couldn’t grab on a short hop as Tampa Bay went up 4-2.

Matt Holliday tied it at 4 on a two-run homer in the eighth off Ryne Stanek.

The Yankees got a scare in the eighth when second baseman Starlin Castro and Judge collided while chasing Daniel Robertson‘s foul ball near the right field bullpen. Both stayed in the game.

The Yankees got Castro’s run-scoring grounder in the first and a third-inning RBI double from Jacoby Ellsbury.

Morrison drove in run with a double in the first.

The Rays tied the AL record, set by Texas earlier this season, for consecutive games striking out 10 or more times with seven. Tampa Bay struck out 13 times Friday night and lead the majors with 464 this season.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Yankees: INF-OF Tyler Austin (broken left ankle) had his first rehab game with Class A Tampa postponed by rain.

Rays: C Wilson Ramos (right knee surgery) took on-field batting practice for the first time. … RHP Shawn Tolleson had Tommy John surgery. Wednesday. … HP Tommy Hunter (right calf strain) will throw batting practice Saturday.

UP NEXT

Yankees: RHP Masahiro Tanaka (5-2) and RHP Matt Andriese (3-1) are Saturday’s scheduled starters. Tanaka is coming off a start Sunday against Houston where he allowed eight runs and four homers in 1 2/3 innings of a 10-7 loss.

Republished by permission from the Associated Press.

Donald Trump attorney didn’t want him to sign financial disclosure

President Donald Trump’s attorneys initially wanted him to submit an updated financial disclosure without certifying the information as true, according to correspondence with the Office of Government Ethics.

Attorney Sheri Dillon said she saw no need for Trump to sign his 2016 personal financial disclosure because he is filing voluntarily this year. But OGE director Walter Shaub said his office would only work with Dillon if she agreed to follow the typical process of having Trump make the certification.

The Associated Press obtained the letters under a Freedom of Information Act request.

Trump led his family’s private company until becoming president, and even now maintains financial ties to it. He has avoided full transparency about his finances by breaking the long tradition of major party political candidates making their tax returns public.

His attorney’s effort to sidestep certification of his personal financial disclosure marks another departure from the norm. Each year, the OGE processes thousands of those forms, all of which are certified.

“This is not at all typical; in fact I’ve never heard of anyone trying this,” said Marilyn Glynn, an OGE employee for 17 years before retiring in 2008. Her positions included acting director and general counsel. “It would be as unusual as not signing your taxes.”

The certification means that if a person knowingly included incorrect financial information, the OGE can seek a civil penalty such as a fine, or even make a referral to the Justice Department for criminal prosecution.

Glynn said OGE has indeed used those tools to enforce the integrity of certification.

The letters indicate Shaub and Dillon talked through the importance of Trump presenting true information and signing off on it as such. OGE typically works with federal employees and their representatives and also certifies the financial disclosures.

“As we discussed, OGE will provide this assistance on the condition that the President is committed to certifying that the contents of his report are true, complete and correct,” Shaub wrote in a May 10 letter. “When we met on April 27, 2017, you requested that he be excused from providing this certification.”

In her letter to Shaub, Dillon says the president will “sign and file” documents regarding his 2016 financials by mid-June — an indication that she agreed to the requirement.

Dillon also stressed in her letter, dated May 9, that Trump is under no obligation to file a financial disclosure this year and is doing so voluntarily. “President Trump welcomes the opportunity to provide this optional disclosure to the public, and hopes to file it shortly,” she wrote.

Personal financial disclosures include an accounting of a person’s personal income, assets and liabilities. Trump’s 2016 form will span his general election candidacy, election and transition to power — potentially shedding light on the immediate impact his Republican nomination and election had on his Trump Organization.

Last May, then-candidate Trump’s disclosure form showed his business empire had grown in value while he was running for office. However, the information is no substitute for tax returns, which Trump has chosen not to release. Tax documents would show his effective rate of income tax and detail the extent of his charitable giving.

Trump’s decision to file a personal financial disclosure puts him in the company of past Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush and others. The law gives presidents a reprieve from filing financial disclosures in their first year, but citing transparency, they typically file anyway on or before May 15.

Shaub references that history in the first line of his letter to Dillon: “Thank you for your letter dated May 9, 2017, regarding the President’s decision to adhere to the longstanding tradition of voluntarily filing a public financial disclosure report in the first year after taking office.”

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

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