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Pam Bondi touts $165 million recovered by state’s Medicaid fraud unit

Florida has proved to be one of the most effective states in the nation last year for recovering Medicaid fraud money.

A report issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services revealed Florida recovered more than $165 million in otherwise lost funds through fraudulent Medicaid cases during fiscal year 2015-2016, the state’s attorney general said in a statement Thursday.

The report shows Attorney General Pam Bondi’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) is working, according to the Office of Inspector General for Health and Human Services.

“My Medicaid Fraud Control Unit investigators work tirelessly to stop Medicaid fraud and recover stolen funds for taxpayers,” Bondi said in the statement. “This report sends the strong message that we will continue to aggressively pursue anyone trying to defraud Florida’s Medicaid program.”

According to the report, Florida ranked only second in the nation in total funds recovered for the 2015-2016 fiscal year, with New York raking in the most at nearly $229,000,000.

Since taking office in 2011, Bondi’s MFCU has obtained more than half a billion dollars in settlements and judgments in total.

The unit investigates and prosecutes providers that intentionally defraud the state’s Medicaid program through fraudulent billing practices. In addition, the MFCU investigates allegations of patient abuse, neglect and exploitation in facilities receiving payments under the Medicaid program.

Each year OIG of the HHS publishes a report of the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit statistical data from the preceding federal fiscal year.

California and Texas ranked third and fourth, respectively, with California saving more than $136,000,000 and Texas saving more than $128,000,000.

To view HHS OIG’s report, click here.

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Engineers give Florida a “C” grade for infrastructure

Florida’s infrastructure is getting a grade of “C” by civil engineers, but that’s still better than the grade of “D+” given to the nation overall.

An American Society of Civil Engineers report card released Thursday says investing in infrastructure must be a top priority in Florida given its growing population.

The report card looked at all the state’s infrastructure, from transportation to water to energy.

Florida’s best score was on bridges, for which it received a “B.” The report card says only 1.7 percent of Florida’s bridges are structurally deficient.

Florida’s worst scores were for coastal areas because of beach erosion and schools. The report card faulted Florida schools for not keeping pace with a growing student population, as well as its aging school buildings.

Republished with permission of The Associated Press.

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Florence Snyder: You know you talk like a toddler, right?

A recent and deeply disturbing addition to the Word Salad Hall of Shame is the painfully frequent use of the word “right” pronounced in the earnest tone of a toddler in need of constant reassurance.

“I pooped in the big girl potty, right? so I can play with my Legos, right? and then we can go to Granny’s, right? and we can have hot dogs for dinner, right?” is an adorable, if exhausting, indication that a little one is learning how to win friends and influence those closest to her. Soon, she’ll leave the need for constant reassurance behind and make her way in the bigger world of classrooms and playgrounds.

Even a small dose of “right?” is anything but adorable in the mouths of politicians, pundits, and other professionals who get paid to persuade us that they know what they’re talking about.

It was bad enough when adults in positions of authority took to ending simple declarative sentences with a “right?” Now, they’re tacking it on to the end of each clause.

Many of the hackneyed expressions that make up the iceberg lettuce-base of Word Salad are used primarily by Valley Girls and Someone’s Ne’er Do Well Nephew that we aren’t listening to, anyway. By contrast, “right?” has metastasized to some really smart people at every point along the political spectrum.

We’d listen to them more if they weren’t in constant need of soothing, like the brilliant baby-man that Beck Bennett plays so brilliantly.

It’s a good time to buy teddy bears, right? and baby blankies, right? because we seem to be having an adult onset insecurity epidemic. Right?

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Lawyers for DCF contend agency didn’t lie to South Florida court; made ‘mistake’

Attorneys representing the Department of Children and Families (DCF) told a Miami foster care judge on Wednesday they did not lie, but made a “simple mistake” when they gave faulty information about a girl who may have witnessed the suicide of another child in their foster home, according to a newspaper.

The Miami Herald reported on the tense hearing in which lawyers appeared in front of Judge Maria Sampedro-Iglesia, by her order and under threat of potential jail time, to prove they did not intentionally lie to, or mislead, the judge as a way to divert attention away from a child in the same foster home as Naika Venant, 14, who hung herself in January while streaming it on video via Facebook Live.

In the case, the chief lawyer for DCF in Miami, Clarissa Cabreja, appeared in court on Wednesday to tell the judge her error was a mix-up, the Herald said. A girl identified as J.W., who might have witnessed Naika’s death, was confused with another child also under DCF care with the initials J.W. – the wrong J.W., Cabreja admitted to the judge, according to the Herald.

The so-called mistake was preventing the judge in the relevant J.W.’s case not to be able to follow up on her care.

At point is whether the actual J.W., who could have witnessed Naika’s death, was receiving trauma services or the appropriate counseling she needed. Then the “mistake” happened, DCF lawyers claimed.

On Feb. 28 Sampedro-Iglesia threatened the attorneys with contempt of court and possible jail time.

Wednesday’s hearing was meant to clarify the situation, but as the Herald reported, and as video from the hearing shows, it was edgy from the start.

The attorneys were accused of not demonstrating a sense of urgency on the matter, especially in clarifying the situation with J.W., which the judge pointed out was an error not initiated by DCF itself.

In the Feb. 28 order, Sampredro-Iglesia accused Cabreja, who leads Children’s Legal Services in Miami, of not being truthful when the attorney wrote in a court pleading “that the judge in J.W.’s case had been informed that she was in the Miami Gardens foster home with Naika,” the Herald reported.

“No one thought it was important that this child had been in the home where another child had taken her own life?” Sampedro-Iglesia said to Cabreja, according to the Herald.

Then Sampedro-Iglesia took Cabreja to task, asking her a series of questions, like what was the “golden rule” of child welfare law. Sheridan Weissenborn, Cabreja attorney, objected, but Sampedro-Iglesia carried forward.

At one point, Weissenborn got up and admonished the judge, saying she was moving away from the original task at hand.

“While mistakes happened with regard to a case number,” Weissenborn said in the video excerpt seen in the Herald’s website, “the real issue here is the court’s concerns about these children, and they are getting the services they needed. That’s been taken care of by those judges.”

“There is no contempt,” Weissenborn added.

The judge said she would wait to make her ruling.

DCF, beleaguered by a series of high-profile children’s deaths in recent years and month while in under the agency’s custody, along with a host of investigator arrests, has been hobbled by its ability to control personnel and foster homes; hiring unqualified – or at the very least, unethical, investigators and placing children in dangerous homes. They have been accused by the federal government of removing children from homes too quickly, too.

In counties where sheriff’s lead child welfare investigations, funded by grants, similar instances of neglect and problems exist as well, according to annual performance review evaluations, although the sheriff’s child investigation teams tend to have a good record of initial responses to abuse calls.

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State lawmakers applaud Florida TaxWatch during annual State of Taxpayer dinner

State lawmakers applauded Florida TaxWatch this week, hailing the organization for its role in the legislative process.

“The folks that formed Florida TaxWatch had a good focus in mind,” said Sen. Jack Latvala. “And as a result of Florida TaxWatch’s efforts, we’ve turned things around.”

The taxpayer advocacy group hosted its State of the Taxpayer dinner Wednesday. The annual event is meant to highlight issues affecting the average taxpayer, and features speeches from Latvala, Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera, Attorney General Pam Bondi, Rep. Jim Boyd and Rep. Manny Diaz. House Speaker Richard Corcoran was scheduled to attend, but was unable to make it, according to a spokesman for the organization.

While speakers used the event as a chance to promote the work they’re doing, some took a few moments to show their support for Enterprise Florida, one of Gov. Rick Scott’s top priorities.

Latvala, who serves as chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, said at some point the state needs to start thinking about how it can balance its desire to keep taxes low, while still meeting the needs of the state.

“I believe the way we do that, just like the governor believes, is by growing the economy organically,” said Latvala. “We need to bring in high paid employees and get them in to the Florida economy, get them buying homes. And that’s been a function that’s been performed admirably by Enterprise Florida.”

While the program has come under fire in recent years, Latvala told attendees the program was the “creation of Republican leaders.” And before Enterprise Florida, there was a “zero match” when it came to companies putting in dollars to recruit businesses.

“We’ve come a long way,” he said. “If we get rid of our (economic incentive) programs, we’re going into the world in a competition situation naked as a jaybird. And I don’t want to do that.”

Florida TaxWatch has opposed legislation by the Florida House that would eliminate Enterprise Florida and a slew of other economic incentive programs. The bill cleared the House Appropriations Committee last week, and is scheduled to get its first hearing in the full House on Thursday.

“The session has gotten off to a slow start, with not much happening in the next couple of days,” joked Lopez-Cantera.

Boyd, the chairman of the House Ways & Means Committee, discussed what his committee was doing, and said the House wants what is best for Florida.

“I do believe with all of my heart, and I know leadership of the House does as well, that we’re all out for the same thing. At the end of the day we want a vibrant economy, we want jobs, we want good education,” he said. “I know that as we move through this process … we share the same goal. This is a marathon, not a sprint. We’re getting closer every day.”

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Lyft now offering rides in Tallahassee

Ridesharing company Lyft earned praise from Tallahassee officials Wednesday after announcing that it was open for business in the capital city.

“Tallahassee was proud to be one of the first cities in the state to approve favorable ridesharing laws, and we are excited that Lyft is now expanding into the Capital City,” said Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum. “So many areas of Florida have benefitted from the opportunities that ridesharing represents, for both passengers and drivers.

Gillum’s sentiment was echoed by Leon County Commissioner John Dailey and Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Sue Dick, who said Lyft’s arrival “shows that Tallahassee remains at the cutting edge.”

Jaime Raczka, Lyft’s head of early stage markets and expansion, said the company is “excited to bring Lyft’s affordable, reliable rides to Tallahassee. Whether you use Lyft while enjoying a night out in Midtown, coming home from a Seminole game, or rushing to a meeting downtown, we look forward to being a part of the Capital City community for years to come.”

Lyft, like competitor Uber, allows customers to book rides that are less expensive than traditional taxis through a mobile app.

One of the few major differences between the two transportation networks companies is Lyft has an in-app option to tip your driver. The company said drivers have brought in more than $150 million in tips since Lyft started up.

As part of the expansion into Tallahassee, the company is offering riders $5 off their first ride if they use the code LYFTLOVE17. Lyft is also encouraging those interested in driving to view the “Drive with Lyft” page on its website.

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Family complains about noisy, alleged drug-dealing neighbors; gets DCF-style investigation by Sheriff’s office

A mother and father have had enough of their neighbors’ drug-dealing, late-night romps that devolve from friendly partying into “screaming matches,” court records in a lawsuit filed in early March indicate.

Jose and Lisa Alecia, with their two children, are homeowners in the Gibsonton neighborhood, located in Hillsborough County outside of Tampa, are seeking $75,000 for damages caused by three neighbors renting a townhome next door in violation of community background screenings.

Around two years ago, Yaritza Heredia, Victor Vincente and Bastin Joseph moved in next door, lessees in a house typically required background screenings and more. However, the homeowner did not carry out the standard searches required before letting the trio rent the place.

Over time, a rift widened, as the complaint describes, with the younger three next door to the Alicea’s staying up late and partying, smoking marijuana in plain view for people to see, being loud, riding four-wheel ATVs and tearing up the grounds with those vehicles, etc.

The Alicea’s called the various applicable homeowners’ associations and the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office.

After that, the documents allege, Heredia, Vincente, and Joseph were party to making threats against the Alicea’s, at one point saying “watch out.”

In retaliation for the Alicea’s complaints, the renters allegedly filed a false report to DCF, citing a host of activities on the part of the Alicea’s, including drug dealing. The neighbors had gone tit for tat.

The phone call warranted a visit to the Alisea’s home by an investigator, most likely an investigator from the Child Protection Team with the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office. (Hillsborough is one of six counties where sheriff’s offices lead all child welfare investigations, not the Florida Department of Children and Families [DCF] – four of those six are in the Tampa Bay area.)

A call placed to the Hillsborough Sheriff’s child protection team by FloridaPolitics.com was not immediately returned as to whether a case was still open against the Alicea’s.

The suit alleges malice, negligence, gross negligence, slander, and the demand for an injunction on the dogs, and on Heredia, Vincente and Joseph when they recently filed a false report against the Plaintiffs.

“Specifically, on or about Jan. 30, 2017, the (the three) filed, or caused to be filed, a report indicating that Plaintiffs were involved with and/or selling drugs, which caused the (DCF) to go to the school of Plaintiff’s children on Feb. 2, 2017, with Plaintiffs’ children pulled out of class, and questioned (without their parents present), including questions about any drug use in the home, if there are drugs or weapons in the home, and if there are persons coming in or out of the home regularly,” according to the court filing. “Plaintiffs’ children were upset over the DCF experience and did not understand why law enforcement was pulling them out of class. In addition, law enforcement came to Plaintiffs’ home on Feb. 2, 2017, and did a search of Plaintiffs’ home (no drugs were found) and required Plaintiffs to submit to drug testing, which Plaintiffs both passed.”

Calls were placed to the Alicea’s were not immediately returned Wednesday.

The renters don’t appear to have voter registration IDs in Hillsborough County.

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LEGOLAND to celebrate The LEGO Batman Movie with special event this weekend

LEGOLAND Florida Resort will celebrate the Caped Crusader with activities centering around The LEGO Batman Movie Saturday and Sunday at the place #BuiltForKids.

Fans can meet Gotham City’s iconic superhero –  in LEGO form – at the Winter Haven theme park. LEGO Batman Movie Days will include a photo op with LEGO Batman, a Batman-themed scavenger hunt throughout MINILAND USA and a variety of hands-on LEGO building activities inspired by the movie. Guests can also watch master builders create a 7-foot tall LEGO Joker.

The Big Shop and LEGO Studio Store will have LEGO building sets, limited-edition LEGO mini figures, costumes, accessories and more from the Batman movie.

Regular admission and annual passes will apply for the LEGO Batman Movie Days. No extra ticket is required.

 

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Blake Dowling: The road, fast food and Session — all aboard!

Session is here in the Capital City, beginning with a Monday bash at Associated Industries to welcome those from all over the state.

The Legislative Session kickoff has been on my calendar for a decade now; it is a great event and a nice chance to reflect on the past year and the one coming just ahead.

Mayor Andrew Gillum wants to run for governor, legal pot is everywhere, POTUS can give a good speech. What else? Charlie Christ switched back to the GOP, got a divorce or something like that. It’s hard to keep tabs on Chuckles.

For those traveling from out of town make sure to stay away from fast food. It is hard on the system, makes you fat and decreases your life span.

Wendy’s is making it hard to avoid fast food, as they are leading the pack with devious innovative ways to get a double cheeseburger in your hand (where are they square, by the way).

What are they doing? Self-service kiosks for one thing. I wrote in an earlier column that the model Amazon’s new cashier less smart self-serve store would be appealing to big business looking to save money from a higher minimum wage. The head burger honchos came to the same conclusion. How do they stay highly profitable? Get rid of employees.

So, those are elected officials that always want to raise taxes and the minimum wage.

Stop. I was talking to John Londot from Greenberg Traurig about a minute ago about AI (we are collaborating on something for Leon County next week), and it’s not just minimum wage workers that should be on alert.

We must all be mindful of what sort of impact AI could have on the world. We could have an autonomous utopia on our hands or a scorched wasteland.

I prefer to think positive on the subject and I know John does too. We must not fear innovation but that is not to say we should not walk carefully.

“Technology can play a great role in creating a better customer experience, unlocking productivity, driving throughput and ultimately saving some labor to help us to continue to have a strong economic model,” said Todd Penegor, Wendy’s CEO.

Wendy’s has created a lab — called 90 Degrees — with a team of developers and engineers to work on self-serving kiosks, its website and mobile app.

They want you using smart pay, and who do you think they are targeting? Youth. Millennials. They want to make the Clown and the King as irrelevant as the compact disc.

They are well on their way, plus they are rolling out a standardized POS (point of sale, not the other acronym you were thinking of) to all stores. They are making a massive investment in innovation and expect them to crush the competition, except Chick-fil-A. Can’t touch the master.

Wendy’s want you ordering from the app, from kiosks and have an agile and nimble digital experience with their brand. And they are half way there.

Da da da da da … I’m McLoving it.

___

Blake Dowling is CEO of Aegis Business Technologies and writes for several organizations. He can be reached here: dowlingb@aegisbiztech.com.

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DCF roundup: ‘Beating, burning … electrical shocking’ of children; another infant’s death is Dept’s third visit

Brace yourself, because this is the Lord’s Day and we here at Florida Politics don’t like being the bearer of bad news on Sunday, but it is what it is. Save a few prayers for the souls in today’s roundup, especially the first two entries, which are ugly and uglier.

— We begin in Fort Myers, where municipal police were notified by Dept. of Children and Families (DCF) investigators in late February there was a certain amount of disturbing information being gathered on one Jhonson Benel and his family, according to Fort Myers Police Department Lt. Jay Rodriguez, who confirmed Benel’s arrest to FloridaPolitics.com early Sunday morning.

Benel, 37, was charged with one count of aggravated child abuse and two counts of child neglect (without bodily harm) and quickly posted a $40,000 bond in just four and a half hours after being arrested. However, some of the details coming out of the case are, indeed, disturbing.

According to Rodriguez, there was no sexual abuse, but rather “physical abuse – to the extent of bruising, beating, burning and possibly even electrical shocking,” he said.

It’s assumed Benel is the father of the two minor children, whose names and ages are being protected due to privacy laws.

Rodriguez wasn’t aware of whether or not Benel’s prior history included child abuse. Most aspects of the case are confidential at this time, as the investigation is ongoing – standard protocol in DCF cases. But the basic facts are there were two children being abused – one potentially more than the other.

A regional DCF spokesperson told The News-Press that both children had been placed in the care of relatives.

Moving on …

— We switch to the east coast of Florida, to Loxahatchee in Palm Beach County, where an 11-month-old toddler boy was discovered by his “caregiver” in the crib “whimpering” with a blanket wrapped around his neck, according to The Palm Beach Post. A week later, on Wednesday, after being on life support, he was dead, the story says.

This wasn’t the first time something unusual had happened to the boy, who lived in both Palm Beach and Broward counties during his short stint on this planet.

His death marks the third investigation into the boy by DCF investigators, the Post reported.

“DCF fielded at least two reports of abuse in the baby’s 11 months of life, the first being not long after he was born. Department records do not indicate the nature of the incident, beyond stating that the boy was eventually placed into his mother’s care,” the Post said. “At least one of those investigations yielded verified proof either of abuse or neglect.”

It was unclear on Sunday whether the “caregiver” under whose care the boy was in was a family member or not, but one thing is clear, his care was in constant question.

“We are devastated to learn of the loss of this child and we grieve with all those who cared for him,” DCF Sec. Mike Carroll said in a statement Friday, according to the Post. “The family is known to the child welfare system, and because of the history and ongoing involvement, a Critical Incident Rapid Response Team will be deployed to review all interaction with this child.”

The Post noted 23 children died in Palm Beach County in 2016, with at least two of them having been determined to be homicides.

“The family’s of those two children both had been investigated multiple times by the department,” the Post concluded.

— Next up, we move to the Panhandle and Walton County, where a 23-month-old toddler was left alone for an undetermined amount of time and was found “unresponsive” while in the care of his drugged out father, according to Panama City’s digital newspaper, MyPanhandle.com, last week.

Sheriff’s deputies pulled over Joshua Daniel Huckaba on State Highway 83 and discovered the child unconscious and took him to the hospital, where he was treated and released.

Huckaba admitted to law enforcers he had been using pot in the car, presumably with the toddler still inside – helpless to the wafting smoke. Huckaba was arrested for possession of methamphetamine, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, and possession of drug paraphernalia, the news outlet said.

DCF is said to be investigating.

— And on to Orange City, where we bring you a bizarre story that might seem humorous if only for the sheer lack of training or overwhelming ignorance on the part of the staff of an assisted-living facility for seniors.

On Friday the Daytona Beach News Journal reported the strange situation of a resident patient who had a thing for pulling his pants down and exposing himself. Apparently there were “numerous incidents of sexual contact between one male patient and multiple female patients,” the News Journal noted in its lede sentence.

The report cites the investigation as being carried out by regulators with the state Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA), which did not note whether the encounters were consensual. (We asked you to pray for these souls, didn’t we? It gets worse … )

As the News-Journal continued, citing AHCA documentation: “In all, the agency documented six incidents, according to AHCA officials: the man was twice found engaging in sexual intercourse with another patient; he touched staff members inappropriately; he was found once locked in the bathroom with another patient with his pants down; and he exposed himself, forcing female patients to touch his genitals.”

Wow. We’re at a loss for words it’s so disturbing.

And the reference to humor? There’s nothing really humorous here – it was a hook to keep you reading through to this story. The reference is actually disturbing.

Staff reported the incidents to senior managers, but the facility’s top executives did not change anything.

“What’s more, regulators said, employees were unaware that they were also required to report the incidents to Florida’s Department of Children and Families,” the News-Journal said. “AHCA officials concluded: ‘The facility lacks a cogent understanding of a resident’s right to personal dignity, individuality, and privacy.’”

Harsh.

The investigation is still ongoing.

And finally

— DCF officials issued the two recalls this morning regarding Evanger’s dog and cat food, and Meijer ham and cheese sandwiches for those of us who like pre-made food. Please take note for the safety of your loved ones, which include your pets:

Evanger’s Pet Food and Against the Grain Voluntarily Recalls Additional Products Out of Abundance of Caution due to Potential Adulteration with Pentobarbital

Out of an abundance of caution, Evanger’s Dog & Cat Food is voluntarily expanding its recall of Hunk of Beef and is also recalling Evanger’s Braised Beef and Against the Grain’s Pulled Beef Products due to potential adulteration with pentobarbital. Oral exposure to pentobarbital can cause drowsiness, dizziness, excitement, loss of balance, nausea, nystagmus (eyes moving back and forth in a jerky manner), inability to stand, coma and death. Consumers who notice these symptoms in their pets should consult their veterinarian.

Meijer Expands Recall To Include Meijer Artisan Made Natural Muenster Cheese And Pre-Made Ham Sub Sandwich Due To Possible Health Risk

Meijer expanded its list of recalled items to now include its Meijer brand Artisan Made Natural Muenster Cheese and its pre-wrapped Ham Sub on Artisan White Baguette due to a potential cross contamination with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, a Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

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