Rick Kriseman Archives - Page 6 of 44 - SaintPetersBlog

USF St. Pete announces climate action plan

Sophia Wisniewska, the regional chancellor at USF St. Petersburg, announced Friday that the campus has created a climate action plan to help the university reach its goal of carbon neutrality by 2050.

Wisniewska made her announcement as part of a press conference at St. Petersburg City Hall with Mayor Rick Kriseman. Kriseman set out the city’s next steps for converting the city to 100 percent renewable energy.

USFSP’s action plan, or CAP, will serve as a guide to help the university reach its sustainability goal of 50 percent carbon neutrality by 2035 and 100 percent carbon neutrality by 2050. The plan, a set of goals and strategies that were developed by USFSP staff and students to reduce carbon emissions, reflects an extensive analysis of the campus’s 2014 greenhouse gas inventory and daily use forecast.

On Earth Day 2013, USFSP became a signatory of the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment in recognition of the challenges that will be faced by waterfront communities as a result of global climate change. Meeting ACUPCC expectations and ranking in the Princeton Review Green Colleges guide are among the key performance indicators outlined in the university’s Vision 20/20 Strategic Plan, which the CAP aims to help satisfy.

“The creation and implementation of this plan is a huge step—not only for USFSP, but for the entire St. Petersburg community,” said Brian Pullen, sustainability coordinator at USFSP. “What is so special about the CAP is that it has taken a lot of hard work over the course of two years from several students, staff, researchers, and specialists within their respected fields.

“Together, we developed a feasible, yet aggressive, plan for guidance on how the university will foster innovative solutions to mitigate and adapt to 21st century global and environmental issues.”

The St. Petersburg City Council recently approved the city’s own Integrated Sustainability Action Plan (ISAP), which will serve as a road map to help the city transition to 100 percent clean, renewable energy. St. Petersburg will become the first city in Florida and 20th in the nation to commit to this goal.

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St. Pete takes first steps to comprehensive plan to handle climate change, rising seas

About a year ago, St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman signed an executive order establishing an office of sustainability.

Now, a group of experts from New Orleans, Miami, Boston and Tampa Bay have come together in partnership with St. Petersburg officials to set strategies that can be used in developing a comprehensive plan to answer the problems presented by climate change and rising seas.

The two-day conference, spearheaded by the Urban Land Institute of Tampa Bay, did not limit itself to the effect of storms, droughts and other emergencies on real property. Members of the group also considered the impact of climate emergencies on people and businesses. They also considered the disparate impact on some members of society who are older, poorer or who, for other reasons, are less able to cope with problems caused by the climate.

The real challenge, they said, is to raise climate change to an issue that’s in the front of peoples’ minds.

Among the strategies they recommend St. Pete consider in coming up with a plan:

Communicate with and educate residents about the need for such a plan. This should include people from all areas of the city.

Communicate with and educate businesses about the need for a plan and the wisdom of preparing to survive climate emergencies and to recover afterwards.

Think regionally and create partnerships with all stakeholders. This could include other governments, businesses, schools, homeowners’ associations, among other groups.

Demonstrate what’s possible with city projects: Consider, for example, including resiliency as a part of the redesign of Tropicana Field.

Be sure to budget for resiliency.

“There have been some really good takeaways,” St. Petersburg Council member Darden Rice said.

She added that resiliency in the face of sea rise and climate change is “not just an esoteric greenie subject about how to build neat buildings.”

Rice said she was especially struck by the need to include resiliency as a part of the city budget. And, she said, the issue of resiliency for all St. Petersburg residents is extremely important.

“It’s hard to be resilient when you’re broke,” Rice said.

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Rick Kriseman: St. Petersburg’s economy is ‘vibrant’

No matter where you look in St. Petersburg, you see signs of a thriving, growing economy, Mayor Rick Kriseman said Monday.

That’s true, he said, whether you look at south St. Petersburg, the Tyrone area, the Skyway district or the Gateway area. Every section of the city is showing signs of economic growth.

“It isn’t just in downtown,” Kriseman said. “A vibrant city has economic development happening all over.”

Deputy Mayor Kanika Tomalin agreed, saying, “St. Petersburg’s economic landscape is on fire. … We’re only on the cusp of what’s possible.”

Kriseman and Tomalin were talking Monday to a room full of business and political leaders at the mayor’s second annual state of the economy presentation. The presentation looked at the city’s economic growth from the standpoint of data as well as projects in the city.

A snapshot of St. Pete’s population shows a 5 percent increase in growth – or about 28,000 more residents – since 2010. Those residents, and the population as a whole, tend to be well educated and younger than in the past. St. Petersburg has pockets of poverty throughout its municipal area, but overall, it has the second lowest poverty rate among Florida’s major cities.

That population growth has spurred a residential building boom – of the $654 million in permitted new construction during the past year, almost half – 42 percent – was residential.

Kriseman said some have questioned the amount of residential development in light of the city’s sewer issues. The city has been fined for dumping thousands of gallons of raw and partially treated sewage into the bay during two tropical storms this year. And the city is facing a multi-year, multi-million dollar program to remedy the problems.

The mayor said the residential development has no impact on the city’s sewer issues.

“We don’t have a sewer problem,” Kriseman said. “What we have … is a rainwater and groundwater problem.”

Had there been no new development, he said, the city’s sewers still would have overflowed this past year because of the infiltration of rainwater and groundwater into cracked and broken pipes.

He added that the residential construction is needed because it will bring in more tax money to pay for repairs and upgrades to the system.

Kriseman again touched on the sewer issue when he spoke about redeveloping the Pier. The city has already sold bonds to finance the new pier and has put about $62 million in escrow. Laws prohibit the city borrowing for one item and spending the money on another. And, he said, it would cost St. Petersburg about $35 million to buy back the bonds prematurely. That, he said, makes no sense.

“We will have a pier,” Kriseman said. “We are going to build a pier.”

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Mitch Perry Report for 12.2.16 – The Rock in 2024?

Rick Kriseman’s appointment of former WTFS weatherman Bill Logan to serve in the newly created position of communications director for the public works department is getting (predictably) negative reviews in the Pinellas County GOP world, who think it is more “big government” from the Democratic-leaning administration. It naturally fuels speculation about who will the Pinellas County Republican prop up to challenge the mayor next year, if Rick Baker opts not to not to get into the race. As is usually the case with the former St. Pete Mayor, no one on the outside is clear where he is on such a big decision, and he’s likely to play the Hamlet card with those of us in the media before making that decision. If not Baker, is there anyone else viable?

While the world waits to figure out how far Donald Trump will go on some of the (few) specific policies that he enunciated during his successful campaign, immigration always rises to the top. Trump has promised to deport the two-million plus undocumented immigrants who have criminal records, but that’s going to be a problem. According to the NY Times, there is a backlog of more than 520,000 in the 56 nationwide immigration courts around the nation. The paper reports that at least hundreds of thousands of those deportations would have to be approved by immigration judges, which means the most efficient way to clear the backlog would be to hire more immigration judges. Except that there was another promise made on the trail – that he intends to freeze federal hiring new resources.

“Now in Denver, the court with the longest wait times in the country, most cases drag on more than five years, the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, a research group studying federal data, has found,” the Times reports.

The Democratic National Committee won’t choose their chairman for two more months, but the early front-runner, Minnesota Representative Keith Ellison, says he’s getting smeared about some of his comments going back to the early 1990’s.  The Anti-Defamation League says that his 2010 comments about about whether Israel controls U.S. foreign policy are “deeply disturbing and disqualifying.”

You’re hearing from a lot of blowhard baseball purists today, hailing the decision by Major League Baseball to award home field advantage in the World Series to the pennant winner with the best regular-season record, and not the representative from the League that won the All-Star game. Sure, it makes sense, but do you know what the rule was before 2002, when Bud Selig made the change? It alternated between the leagues, with zero consideration about who had the best record in the game. So there.

And forget about Kanye West in 2020, what about The Rock? The man just declared the Sexiest Man Alive by People and the highest paid actor by Forbes tells Sports Illustrated that he’s thinking of running for office. “I’m something I’m very serious about in the future,” says the 44-year-old registered Republican.

In other news..

Davison’s loose talk about using secession of New Tampa from the rest of the city has prompted Bob Buckhorn to come off the sidelines and endorse Viera, a fellow Democrat.

The state of Florida was behind the majority of states when it finally passed a texting while driving law thee years ago, so a South Florida House Democrat would like to make it tougher, changing from a secondary to a primary offense.

For those who want to petition their state government, your best shot at speaking before a state lawmaker may take place in two weeks, when the Hillsborough County Legislative Delegation meets up in Tampa.

And the White House has named the Tampa Bay area and three other Florida regions as “tech-hire” communities. 

 

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Jack Latvala, Jeff Brandes will help control the purse strings in Tallahassee next year

When the dust cleared in Tallahassee on Tuesday, one thing was clear: Pinellas was on top when it comes to the state’s funds.

Republican Sens. Jack Latvala and Jeff Brandes, who represent parts of Pinellas, landed some plum appointments. Latvala will be the chair of the powerful Senate Appropriations Committee and alt. chair of the Joint Legislative Budget Commission. Brandes will have a seat on the Appropriations Committee and be the chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Tourism and Economic Development.

The news was welcomed by local elected officials who expect to ask Tallahassee for money in 2017.

St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman’s office issued a statement, saying, “Their appointments are great news for the city of St. Petersburg, and the Tampa Bay Region.”

Pinellas County Commissioner Janet Long, who will chair the commission in 2017, agreed, saying, “I’d like to think it would be very good for Pinellas County.”

Long said the county has just begun work on its legislative package for the coming year.

The Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority has also begun work on its legislative package. St. Petersburg council member Darden Rice, the PSTA chair, said two projects high on the agenda are rapid transit from the Tampa airport to Clearwater and Clearwater Beach and a bus lane on the Clearwater causeway.

Both Latvala and Brandes are aware of the need for the projects, she said. And Brandes, in particular, has already been supportive of innovative PSTA programs that involve partnerships with companies like Uber and Lyft.

The PSTA, Rice said, “is very fortunate to have two such strong senators. I think this will be very helpful.”

That help, she said, can extend to other issues. One such is the sewer and infrastructure problems facing Pinellas. Although St. Petersburg has taken the brunt of criticism after dumping thousands of gallons of raw and partially treated sewage in the bay during two storms this year, the problem with infrastructure is countywide. Latvala has called two delegation meetings for fact finding.

“I think they had a very clear picture of St. Petersburg’s struggles,” Rice said. “We need help from the state to fix our fragile infrastructure.”

Rice said she’s not talking only about St. Petersburg’s infrastructure. It’s the entire county, she said. That’s another place that the senator’s appreciation for regional solutions will be helpful.

Rice noted that Latvala is known for fighting for what he believes in. That’s good for the county.

“He’s a bruiser,” Rice said. “He’s not afraid to go in and fight for what’s right.”

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Mitch Perry Report for 11.23.16 – Real reform in Tallahassee

Florida’s new legislative class of 2017 is presumably back home for the holidays today after spending the first part of this week in Tallahassee.

House Speaker Richard Corcoran and Senate President Joe Negron welcomed their troops by discussing their respective goals for the 2017 session. In the case of Corcoran, his proposals for lobbying reform have been well publicized in the past week. He also said repeated his pledge yesterday not to accept any spending projects that are not filed as House bills on the very first day of the session. Negron said he won’t be following suit.

“We have tens of thousands of our constituents who come to Tallahassee during session to bring us all kinds of ideas, some which relate to the budget,” Negron said. “And I think it’s perfectly appropriate for the Senate during the legislative session to make decisions on items that will be included in the budget and, by the way, things that will be stricken from the budget.”

The Democratic Senate Leader, Miami Gardens’ Oscar Braynon, had some very interesting things to say about Corcoran’s lobbying proposals.

“To me, that’s not a real change. Most of that is illegal or is not allowed anyway and if it is it’s disclosed,” Braynon told the Miami Herald’s Mary Ellen Klas. “Real change is changing the dynamic where bills are not heard, where ideas are stifled, where people are forced to vote against their conscience. If they change that, then he’s doing a real change. the rest of this is — since Trump got elected I guess I can say this — it’s bulls*it.”

Braynon also referred to an underlying issue that can only be changed by the public – the fact that the s0-called “part-time” Legislature with a part-time salary is the single biggest reason why only the wealthy and/or privileged can actually serve in our “citizens legislature.”

“What do we really want our Legislature to look like?,” Braynon asked. “Do we want it to be wealthy, older guys who are so far along in their professions that they can take six months out of a year to come to Tallahassee for $29,000. What is wrong with a teacher being able to come here? What is wrong with somebody who spent most of his career as a bus drivers coming up here?

Several years ago while he was serving in the House,  Rick Kriseman told me that he was in the middle of switching to work at another law firm. Why? Because the firm he had been working at simply couldn’t abide by his unpredictable schedule.

The News Service of Florida reported in the summer that nearly a third of the Legislature were millionaires. Think about that for a moment. While Republicans like to decry Democrats nationally as being full of coastal elites out of touch with the working class, what about Tallahassee?

So many House Republicans in particular like to comment on how terrible Medicaid is, and that’s why they would never support expanding it to allow hundreds of thousands of Floridians to get health care coverage. Pretty easy to dictate such a philosophy when you’re already covered at reduced prices, isn’t it?

So to summarize: Corcoran’s proposals do present some serious reform, but longterm, there’s a lot more that needs to be done here to make it fairer and more representative for all.

In other news…

While Corcoran’s new rules may be getting mixed reviews in some quarters, Americans for Prosperity’s Florida Chapter is enthusiastic about them.

Since the election, the Hillsborough County Democratic Party has received a surge of requests to join their party.

Stacy White is the new chairman of the Hillsborough County Commission.

Pat Kemp is now officially a BOCC member.

Jim Davison leads Luis Viera 42%-35% in the Tampa City Council District 7 race.

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St. Pete is first Florida city to commit to 100 percent clean energy, Sierra Club says

The St. Petersburg council has agreed to transition the city to 100 percent clean, renewable energy.

The vote makes St. Pete the first Florida municipality and the 20th in the U.S. to make the commitment and sign on to the Sierra Club’s Ready for 100 national campaign, according to the club’s local branch.

The local branch, the Suncoast Sierra Club, sponsors the Ready for 100 Percent St. Pete local campaign that the city also supports. Ready for 100 percent St. Pete develops residential and commercial pilot programs with partner organizations and raises public awareness of clean energy and climate planning.

“This is a historic moment for St. Pete,” said Emily Gorman, manager for the local campaign. “We envision a city where families can raise their kids in communities free from toxic pollution, where everyone has the opportunity for a good job and access to healthy, affordable energy. The transition to 100 percent clean, renewable energy will ensure a more resilient, sustainable and equitable future for all our residents.”

Gorman’s comments came after St. Pete’s city council committee of the whole unanimously voted to allocate $250,000 of BP Oil Spill settlement funds to an “Integrated Sustainability Action Plan” that will chart a road map to 100 percent clean, renewable energy in St. Petersburg.

The 100 percent clean energy roadmap builds on Mayor Rick Kriseman’s executive order establishing a net-zero energy goal for the city.

“This is the most robust, comprehensive climate planning initiative St. Petersburg has ever undertaken,” Kriseman said. “Working toward 100 percent clean energy and zero waste is just one way we continue to build our city of opportunity where the sun shines on all who come to live, work and play. We still have a lot of work to do, but I want to thank city council for their partnership and leadership in unanimously voting to pass this plan.”

In addition to the $250,000 allocated for the Integrated Sustainability Action Plan, two other projects have been funded from the reserved $1 million from the BP Oil Spill settlement funds.

Another $250,000 has been earmarked for an energy efficiency audit and energy retrofits for city facilities and $300,000 has been allocated for collaboration with Pinellas County in developing a vulnerability assessment and modeling program that will assess the impacts and risks from potential future scenarios, such as sea level rise and direct hurricane hits.

“St. Pete’s commitment to sustainability and resiliency shows we lead the way in strategic economic development, smarter infrastructure investments, long-term planning, and measurable quality of life improvements for everyone,” Council member Darden Rice said. “It enhances the identity of our city and tells the world we are serious about clean energy solutions.”

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Tall Ship Lynx to dock in St. Pete — permanently

The Tall Ship Lynx, a modern interpretation of an 1812 American privateer, is scheduled to sail into St. Pete on Wednesday morning where it has found a permanent winter home.

The 110-foot ship is expected to come under the Sunshine Skyway Bridge with full sails sometime around 10 a.m. It will then head into the Vinoy Basin/North Yacht Basin, do a four-gun salute and make her way to Harborage Marina where she will berth until the seasonal dock is finalized right next to the ferry. They plan is to begin opening the boat up to the public for tours, sailing trips, and corporate events this weekend.

The idea of offering the Lynx a permanent berth first came up during then-Mayor Bill Foster’s administration. But the idea never seemed to gel until recently, said Greg Holden, chair of the St. Petersburg Area Chamber of Commerce. More recently, with the support of Council member Ed Montanari, Mayor Rick Kriseman, local businesses and others, the dream looks as if it might become reality.

“This is one of those five-year, overnight successes,” Holden said.

It’s an “amazing” opportunity for the city, he said. Having a tall ship in port is a draw for businesses and tourists. It’s also an attraction to help more people get out onto the water and to learn a bit of history.

The Lynx, he said, would harken back to the days of the Bounty, which was a reconstruction of the 1787 Royal Navy sailing ship HMS Bounty. The Bounty summered in New England and wintered in St. Pete, operating out of the Pier.

“There’s been an overwhelming amount of support” for having the Lynx use St. Petersburg as a permanent winter home, said Don Peacock, executive director of the Lynx Education Foundation. “We’re looking at this as a long-term program.”

The Lynx was built as a hands-on educational tool to teach American history. When she was in St. Petersburg last winter, Peacock said the crew worked with recreational centers in south St. Petersburg and with Admiral Farragut Academy. Kids from both sailed on the ship for a day while they learned how to sail her the way she was sailed in 1812 when the original Lynx went to sea.

“It’s all done by hand,” Peacock said.

Peacock said the Lynx would like to expand its outreach to more schools and recreational centers this year.

The Lynx and its educational programs are run by a non-partisan, nonprofit organization. The funding comes from donations and from the fees that corporations and members of the public pay to go on sails or to rent the Lynx for events.

The Lynx is an interpretation of an 1812 vessel of the same name that was one of the first privateers to take to the seas after the start of the War of 1812. A privateer was used to prey on British merchant vessels. Although the Lynx was designed like a privateer, she was outfitted for trade so she could help keep supply lines open for the Americans during the war. She was captured about a year into the war and saw service as a Royal Navy vessel called the Mosquidobit. In the late 1990s, the modern Lynx was built to the plans of the original.

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Duke Energy to begin multi-million dollar St. Pete power infrastructure upgrade

Downtown St. Petersburg’s power infrastructure is getting a multi-million-dollar safety and reliability upgrade.

Over the next two weeks, crews from Duke Energy will be adding advanced safety features to electrical manholes throughout downtown St. Pete. The project aims to improve the city’s infrastructure as part of a $140 million Duke Energy reliability program.

Starting Nov. 21-23 and Nov. 28-30, weather permitting, Duke will be installing upgrades to manholes between 1st Avenue North and Central and 4th Street North and 5th Street North and on 8th Street North between Central Avenue and 1st Street North.

During the process, drivers may experience temporary lane closures and traffic delays.

The project is part of Duke’s long-term strategy to provide effective power utility customers in the St. Petersburg area.

Duke asks for any customers with questions regarding the project to call 800-700-8744.

In a statement, the company said the planned manhole upgrades are not related to St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman‘s Wastewater Improvement Plan, and are not expected to have any impact on operations, including sanitary sewers, potable, or reclaimed water.

Earlier this month, Kriseman unveiled a $304-million, five-year plan to help alleviate recent problems with the city’s wastewater. Short-term projects will take approximately two years, and the plan should be completed in five years.

Duke Energy Florida serves nearly 1.7 million customers in a 13,000-square mile service area that spans from central Florida to the Panhandle. Headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina, Duke is one of the nation’s largest electric power holding companies, with 7.4 million customers throughout the Southeast and Midwest United States.

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Jack Latvala open to state aid for homeowners needing sewer fixes

State lawmakers had harsh words for St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman during a meeting Wednesday to discuss sewage overflows.

“I caution you on anymore overflows,” state Rep. Kathleen Peters, a Republican who represents House District 69 in the Florida Legislature. “Please be Superman and make sure there is not another overflow.”

Kriseman had just given members of the Pinellas County Legislative Delegation an update on the progress St. Petersburg has made to solving sewage woes. During two tropical storms this past summer, the city dumped thousands of gallons of raw and partially treated sewage into Tampa Bay because the system did not have enough capacity to handle the massive amount of rain.

Kriseman outlined a five-year, $304 million plan to increase capacity and totally revamp the city’s system. Kriseman told the delegation that he has set a target date of August 2017 to have the first improvements in place.

But delegation members were skeptical that Kriseman could make that deadline. Republican state Sen. Jack Latvala asked if the city is offering a bonus to contractors who could bring the projects in on time.

“I’d probably bet against” the city’s being able to complete the short-term improvements by next August, said Latvala.

Claude Tankersley, St. Petersburg’s public works administrator, said the city is planning to offer early completion bonuses.

Both he and Peters wanted to know how Kriseman planned to handle storm and rain events if the city doesn’t make the August completion date. Both asked about the possibility of renting “bladders,” or tanks, or a barge to hold overflow until the system could handle it.

Kriseman and Tankersley said they had considered those, and other solutions, but believed they were not the best use of money. Tankersley added that type of storage is limited because, once the bladders or tanks are filled, they stay filled until they can be emptied after the system recovers. It’s more efficient, Tankersley said, to go ahead with improvements that will enable the system to continue treating wastewater during the entire storm.

Latvala was not convinced.

“I don’t want to explain to the people of Tampa Bay,” he said, why there’s another overflow. “I don’t think that you have adequately explored other options.”

Kriseman said there is no way to guarantee that there would never be an overflow, but “the last thing we want is to have another discharge.”

All agreed that, although St. Petersburg has become the poster child for sewage infrastructure issues, the problem is widespread throughout Pinellas County, Florida and the U.S. One part of the problem is the poor condition of many of the pipes on private property that are carrying wastewater from homes and businesses into municipal systems. The cost for fixing those will fall on homeowners.

Kriseman said the Legislature should put some sort of grant or other program in place to help homeowners afford to have their systems inspected and replaced if necessary. The estimated price for doing so runs between $2,000 to $6,000.

“That’s something we want to put on the table,” Latvala said.

Latvala seemed open to the idea. One possibility, he said, is to tie relief for property owners’ costs to a proposal by Gov. Rick Scott for a matching grant program to encourage the owners of septic tanks to move to a sewer system.

The Pinellas delegation took no action at Wednesday’s meeting. The delegation is scheduled to meet again Dec. 2. Members could take action then.

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